FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Slovakia" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Slovakia
Slovenská republika
Slovak Republic
Flag of Slovakia Coat of arms of Slovakia
Flag Coat of arms
AnthemNad Tatrou sa blýska
"Lightning over the Tatras"

Location of  Slovakia  (orange)

– on the European continent  (camel & white)
– in the European Union  (camel)                 [ Legend] Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_Arms_of_Slovakia. ... Flag ratio: 2:3 When flown vertically the coat of arms is rotated. ... Coat of arms of Slovakia The coat of arms of Slovakia is composed of a silver (argent) double cross, elevated on the middle peak of a dark blue mountain consisting of three peaks. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Nad Tatrou sa blýska is the national anthem of Slovakia. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 710 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Slovakia Portal:Slovakia Portal:Slovakia/Intro ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Capital
(and largest city)
Bratislava
48°09′N, 17°07′E
Official languages Slovak
Demonym Slovak
Government Parliamentary republic
 -  President Ivan Gašparovič
 -  Prime Minister Robert Fico
Independence due to dissolution of Czechoslovakia 
 -  Date January 1, 19931 
EU accession May 1, 2004
Area
 -  Total 49,035 km² (130th)
18,932 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) negligible
Population
 -  2007 estimate 5,447,502 (110th)
 -  2001 census 5,379,455 
 -  Density 111/km² (88th)
287/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2007 estimate
 -  Total $108.237 billion (61st)
 -  Per capita $20,800 (44th)
GDP (nominal) 2007 IMF estimate
 -  Total $55.103 billion (60th)
 -  Per capita $13,227 (44th)
HDI (2004) 0.863 (high) (42nd)
Currency Slovak koruna (1 koruna = 100 haliers) (SKK)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 -  Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Internet TLD .sk²
Calling code +421³
1 Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia; see Velvet Divorce.
² Also .eu, shared with other European Union member states.
³ Shared code 42 with Czech Republic until 1997.

Slovakia (long form: Slovak Republic; Slovak: Slovensko , long form Slovenská republika ) is a landlocked country in Central Europe with a population of over five million and an area of about 49,000 square kilometres (almost 19,000 square miles). The Slovak Republic borders the Czech Republic and Austria to the west, Poland to the north, Ukraine to the east and Hungary to the south. The largest city is its capital, Bratislava. Slovakia is a member state of the European Union, NATO, OECD, WTO, and other international organizations. Not to be confused with capitol. ... The majority of the 5. ... , Nickname: Beauty on the Danube, City of peace Country  Slovakia Region Districts 5  - Bratislava I  - Bratislava II  - Bratislava III  - Bratislava IV  - Bratislava V Rivers Elevation 134 m (440 ft) Coordinates , Highest point Devínska Kobyla  - elevation 514 m (1,686 ft) Lowest point Danube River  - elevation 126 m (413 ft... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Parliamentary republics around the world, shown in Orange (Parliamentary republics with a non-executive President) and Green (Parliamentary republics with an executive President linked to Parliament). ... This is a list of the Presidents of Slovakia. ... Ivan GaÅ¡parovič (born March 27, 1941), Slovak politician and law professor, became President of Slovakia on June 15, 2004. ... Chairman/President of the Provisional Government for Slovakia (1918; within Czechoslovakia) Vavro Šrobár (4 November 1918 – 14 November 1918) – ceased with the adoption of the Czechoslovak constitution Chairman of the Revolutionary Governing Council of the Slovak Soviet Republic (1919; in rebellion in eastern Slovakia) Antonín Janoušek (20 June 1919 – 7... Robert Fico (15 September 1964 in Topoľčany) is the current Prime Minister of Slovakia (since July 4, 2006). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Austria Poland Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech   Rep. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... IMF redirects here. ... Countries by nominal GDP. Source: IMF (2005) This article includes a list of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP), the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... Map of countries by GDP (nominal) per capita for the year 2006. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... ISO 4217 Code SKK User(s) Slovakia Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .sk is the Internet country code top-level domain ( ccTLD) for Slovakia. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... The NDCs are valid since July 1, 2001 Source: Numbering plan published by the Telecommunication Office of the Slovak Republic Categories: | ... The Velvet Divorce is a journalistic term for the dissolution of the former country of Czechoslovakia into the nations of Slovakia and the Czech Republic, effective January 1, 1993. ... Landlocked countries of the world according to The World Factbook. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... , Nickname: Beauty on the Danube, City of peace Country  Slovakia Region Districts 5  - Bratislava I  - Bratislava II  - Bratislava III  - Bratislava IV  - Bratislava V Rivers Elevation 134 m (440 ft) Coordinates , Highest point Devínska Kobyla  - elevation 514 m (1,686 ft) Lowest point Danube River  - elevation 126 m (413 ft... This article is about the military alliance. ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ... For other uses of the initials WTO, see WTO (disambiguation). ...


The Slavic people arrived in the territory of present day Slovakia between the 5th and 6th century AD during the Migration Period (Migration of Nations). Various parts of Slovakia belonged to Samo's Empire, the first known political unit of Slavs, Great Moravia, the Kingdom of Hungary, Habsburg (Austrian) monarchy, Austria-Hungary, Czechoslovakia throughout history. Slovakia became independent on 1 January 1993, with the peaceful division of Czechoslovakia in the Velvet Divorce. Look up AD, ad-, and ad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ... This biography does not cite any references or sources. ... Great Moravia was an empire existing in Central Europe between 833 and the early 10th century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Habsburg Monarchy included the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1745 and 1867/1918. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Velvet Divorce is a journalistic term for the dissolution of the former country of Czechoslovakia into the nations of Slovakia and the Czech Republic, effective January 1, 1993. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Slovakia

This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Before the 5th century
A Roman inscription at the castle hill of Trenčín (178-179 AD).
A Roman inscription at the castle hill of Trenčín (178-179 AD).

From around 450 BC, the territory of modern-day Slovakia was settled by Celts, who built powerful oppida on the sites of modern-day Bratislava and Havránok. Biatecs, silver coins with the names of Celtic kings, represent the first known use of writing in Slovakia. From 2 AD, the expanding Roman Empire established and maintained a chain of outposts around and just north of the Danube, the largest of which were known as Vindobona, Carnuntum and Brigetio. Near the northernmost line of the Roman hinterlands, Limes Romanus there existed the winter camp of Laugaricio (modern-day Trenčín) where the Auxiliary of Legion II fought and prevailed in a decisive battle over the Germanic Quadi tribe in 179 AD during the Marcomannic Wars. The Kingdom of Vannius, a barbarian kingdom founded by the Germanic Suebian tribes of Quadi and Marcomani, as well as several small Germanic and Celtic tribes, including the Osi and Cotini, existed in Western and Central Slovakia from 8-6 BC to 179 AD. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 652 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roman writing on a rock near Trenčín castle Latin: VICTORIAE AVGVSTORV(m) EXERCITVS, QUI LAVGARICIONE SEDIT MIL (ites) L (egionis) I I DCCCLV . ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 652 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roman writing on a rock near Trenčín castle Latin: VICTORIAE AVGVSTORV(m) EXERCITVS, QUI LAVGARICIONE SEDIT MIL (ites) L (egionis) I I DCCCLV . ... Trenčín (Hungarian: Trencsén, German: Trentschin, Latin: Laugaricio) is a town in western Slovakia (close to the Czech border) at the Váh river. ... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ... An enclosed oppidum was a type of large, late Iron Age settlement, or oppidum surrounded by an encircling bank and ditch. ... , Nickname: Beauty on the Danube, City of peace Country  Slovakia Region Districts 5  - Bratislava I  - Bratislava II  - Bratislava III  - Bratislava IV  - Bratislava V Rivers Elevation 134 m (440 ft) Coordinates , Highest point Devínska Kobyla  - elevation 514 m (1,686 ft) Lowest point Danube River  - elevation 126 m (413 ft... Havránok is an important archaeological site in northern Slovakia. ... An original Biatec and its replica on a modern 5-koruna coin. ... AD redirects here. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Danube River. ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]; Slovenian: Dunaj, Croatian and Serbian: Beč Romanian: Viena, Hungarian: Bécs, Czech: Vídeň, Slovak: Viedeň, Romany Vidnya, Russian: Вена) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... Carnuntum (Καρνοιις in Ptolemy) was an important Roman army camp in what is now Austria. ... A limes (or the Limes Romanus) is a border defence system of the Ancient Rome. ... Trenčín (Hungarian: Trencsén, German: Trentschin, Latin: Laugaricio) is a town in western Slovakia (close to the Czech border) at the Váh river. ... The Quadi were a smaller Germanic tribe, about which little definitive information is known. ... Combatants Roman Empire Marcomanni, Quadi, other Germanic peoples along the Danube Commanders Marcus Aurelius The Marcomannic Wars were a series of wars lasting over thirty years during the reign of Marcus Aurelius from about AD 166 until 180, which pitted the Roman Empire against the Marcomanni, Quadi and other Germanic... Vannius was the king of the germanic tribe Quadi. ... For other uses, see Barbarian (disambiguation). ... The Quadi were a smaller Germanic tribe, about which little definitive information is known. ... OSI is primarily used as an abbreviation and has many meanings: OSI Pharmaceuticals, an American pharmaceutical company OSI Restaurant Partners, the restaurant and entertainment group that includes Outback Steakhouse OSI Systems a company that manufactures security scanners and medical equipment based in California Olomouc Summer Institute, an educational program for... Cotini was a Celtic tribe most probably living in todays Slovakia, or (according to occasional opinions) in Moravia and southern Poland. ...


Slavic states

The Slavic tribes settled in the territory of Slovakia in the 5th century. Western Slovakia was the centre of Samo's Empire in the 7th century. A Slavic state, known as the Principality of Nitra, arose in the 8th century and its ruler Pribina had the first known Christian church in Slovakia consecrated by 828. Together with neighboring Moravia, the principality formed the core of the Great Moravian Empire from 833. The high point of this Slavonic empire came with the arrival of Saints Cyril and Methodius in 863, during the reign of Prince Rastislav, and the territorial expansion under King Svatopluk I. Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... This biography does not cite any references or sources. ... The Principality of Nitra or Nitrian Principality (Slovak: Nitrianske kniežatstvo, Nitriansko, Nitrava) was a principality in what is today Slovakia and some adjacent territories in present-day Hungary in the Middle Ages. ... Pribina, also called Priwina or Privina by Frankish chronicles, was the first known prince of the Principality of Nitra (?-833) and of the Balaton Principality (?840-861). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... For other uses, see Moravia (disambiguation). ... Great Moravia was an empire existing in Central Europe between 833 and the early 10th century. ... For details about each of the saints, see Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius. ... Rastislav (?-870) was the second prince of Great Moravia. ... Svatopluk (-modern Czech name; modern Slovak name: Svätopluk; Old Slavic Свѧтопълкъ; reconstructed name: Sventopluk; some names in Latin texts: Suentopolcus, Zventopluk, Suatopluk, Zwentibald) (around 830 - 894) from the Mojmírs dynasty was the prince of the Nitrian principality (850s - 871) and then the king of Great Moravia (871 - 894). ...


Kingdom of Hungary
Emperor Henry III losing his fleet below Bratislava Castle, the oldest known image of the castle (14th century)
Emperor Henry III losing his fleet below Bratislava Castle, the oldest known image of the castle (14th century)

After the disintegration of the Great Moravian Empire in the early 10th century, the Hungarians gradually annexed the territory of the present-day Slovakia. In the late 10th century, south-western Slovakia became part of the arising Hungarian principality, which transformed to the Kingdom of Hungary after 1000. Most of Slovakia was integrated into the Kingdom of Hungary by c. 1100, north-eastern parts by c. 1300. For almost two centuries, it was ruled autonomously as the Principality of Nitra within the Kingdom of Hungary. Slovak settlements extended to northern and south-eastern present-day Hungary. The ethnic composition became more diverse with the arrival of the Carpathian Germans in the 13th century, Vlachs in the 14th century and Jews. Henry III, from a miniature of 1040. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Principality of Nitra or Nitrian Principality (Slovak: Nitrianske kniežatstvo, Nitriansko, Nitrava) was a principality in what is today Slovakia and some adjacent territories in present-day Hungary in the Middle Ages. ... Carpathian Germans (German: , Slovak: Karpatskí Nemci), sometimes simply called Slovak Germans (German: Slowakeideutsche), is the name for a group of German language speakers on the territory of present-day Slovakia. ... Vlachs (also called Vallachians, Wallachians, Wlachs, Wallachs, Olahs or Ulahs, Macedonian: Власи Vlasi, Greek: , Albanian: Vllehë, Turkish: , Ukrainian: , Polish: ) is a blanket term covering several modern Latin peoples (linguistic) descending from the Latinised population in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. ...

Trojičné námestie in Banská Štiavnica, World Heritage Site.
Trojičné námestie in Banská Štiavnica, World Heritage Site.

A huge population loss resulted from the invasion of the Mongols in 1241 and the subsequent famine. However medieval Slovakia was characterized rather by burgeoning towns, construction of numerous stone castles, and the development of art.[citation needed] In 1465, King Matthias Corvinus founded the first university in Bratislava, but it was closed in 1490 after his death.[1] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 358 × 550 pixelsFull resolution (358 × 550 pixel, file size: 371 KB, MIME type: image/png) Country: Slovensko / Slovakia City: Banská Å tiavnica Place: Námestie svätej Trojice / Holy Trinity Square Original Credits: en:User:Rhargas File links The following pages on... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 358 × 550 pixelsFull resolution (358 × 550 pixel, file size: 371 KB, MIME type: image/png) Country: Slovensko / Slovakia City: Banská Å tiavnica Place: Námestie svätej Trojice / Holy Trinity Square Original Credits: en:User:Rhargas File links The following pages on... Banská Å tiavnica (German: , Hungarian: ) is a town in central Slovakia, in the middle of an immense caldera created by the collapse of an ancient volcano. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... The Mongol invasions of Europe were centered in their destruction of the Ruthenian states, especially Kiev, under the leadership of Subutai. ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ... Matthias Corvinus (Mátyás in Hungarian), (February 23, 1443 (?) - April 6, 1490) was one of the greatest Kings of Hungary, ruling between 1458 and 1490. ...


After the Ottoman Empire started its expansion into Hungary and the occupation of Buda in the early 16th century, the centre of the Kingdom of Hungary (under the name of Royal Hungary) shifted towards Pressburg (now Bratislava) became the capital city of the Royal Hungary in 1536. But the Ottoman wars and frequent insurrections against the Habsburg Monarchy also inflicted a great deal of destruction, especially in rural areas. As the Turks retreated from Hungary in the 18th century, Slovakia's importance within the kingdom decreased, although Bratislava retained its position of the capital city of Hungary until 1848, when the capital moved to Budapest. Ottoman redirects here. ... Buda (German: Ofen, Croatian: Budim, Slovak: Budín, Serbian: Будим or Budim, Turkish: Budin) is the western part of the Hungarian capital Budapest on the right bank of the Danube. ... Consequences of the Battle of Mohács, and the conquest of Buda in 1541 by the Ottomans: the Kingdom is partitioned. ... Consequences of the Battle of Mohács, and the conquest of Buda in 1541 by the Ottomans: the Kingdom is partitioned. ... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ...


During the revolution in 1848-49 the Slovaks supported the Austrian Emperor with the ambition to secede from the Hungarian part of the Austrian monarchy, but they failed to achieve this aim. During the period of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, from 1867 to 1918, the Slovaks experienced severe oppression in the form of Magyarization, promoted by the Hungarian government. From March 1848 through July 1849, the Habsburgs Austrian Empire was threatened by revolutionary movements. ... The title of Emperor of Austria was proclaimed in 1804 by the Habsburg Holy Roman Emperor, Francis II, who feared for the future of the old Reich in the face of Napoleons aggressions, and wished to maintain his imperial title in the event that the Holy Roman Empire should... Official languages Latin, German, Hungarian Established church Roman Catholic Capital & Largest City Vienna pop. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

St. Elizabeth's (Elisabeth of Hungary) Cathedral, Košice. Since 1906 the resting place of the remains of Francis II Rákóczi.
St. Elizabeth's (Elisabeth of Hungary) Cathedral, Košice. Since 1906 the resting place of the remains of Francis II Rákóczi.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1204 KB) (Description: Kosice - St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1204 KB) (Description: Kosice - St. ... St. ... St. ... Location of KoÅ¡ice in Slovakia Coordinates: , Country Slovakia Region KoÅ¡ice Region Districts KoÅ¡ice I-IV City parts First mentioned 1230 Government  - Type City Council  - Mayor FrantiÅ¡ek Knapík Area  - City 243. ... Francis II Rákóczi (painted by Ádám Mányoki) Ferenc (Francis) II Rákóczi (Borsi, March 27, 1676 - Rodosto, Ottoman Empire, April 8, 1735) was the leader of the Hungarian uprising against the Habsburgs in 1703-11 as the prince (fejedelem) of the Estates Confederated for Liberty...

Twentieth century

In 1918, Slovakia and the regions of Bohemia and Moravia formed a common state, Czechoslovakia, with the borders confirmed by the Treaty of Saint Germain and Treaty of Trianon. In 1919, during the chaos following the breakup of Austria-Hungary, Slovakia was attacked by the provisional Hungarian Soviet Republic and one-third of Slovakia temporarily became the Slovak Soviet Republic. Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... For other uses, see Moravia (disambiguation). ... The Treaty of Saint-Germain, was signed on 10 September 1919 by the victorious Allies of World War I on the one hand and by the new republic of Austria on the other. ... The negotiations on June 4, 1920. ... Flag Capital Budapest Language(s) Hungarian Government Socialist republic History  - Established March 21, 1919  - Downfall August 6, 1919 The Hungarian Soviet Republic (Hungarian: Magyarországi Tanácsköztársaság) was a Communist regime established in Hungary from March 21 until August 6, 1919, under the leadership of Béla... The Slovak Soviet Republic The Slovak Soviet Republic (in Slovak: Slovenská republika rád = literally: Slovak Republic of Councils - it was before the Russian word soviet (council) became widespread in Slovak and other languages) was a short lived communist state in south and eastern Slovakia from 16 June to 7...


During the inter-war period, democratic and prosperous Czechoslovakia was under continuous pressure from the revisionist governments of Germany and Hungary, until it was finally broken up in 1939, as a result of the Munich Agreement concluded a year before. Southern Slovakia was lost to Hungary due to the First Vienna Award. Revanchism (from French revanche, revenge) is a term used since the 1870s to describe political campaigns to reverse territorial losses incurred by a country during previous wars and strifes, sometimes quite distant in time. ... For the annual global security meeting held in Munich, see Munich Conference on Security Policy The Munich Agreement (Czech: ; Slovak: ; German: ) was an agreement regarding the Sudetenland Crisis among the major powers of Europe after a conference held in Munich, Germany in 1938 and signed in the early hours of... The First Vienna Award was the result of the First Vienna Arbitration (November 2, 1938), which took place at Viennas Belvedere Palace on the eve of World War II. By the award, arbiters from Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy sought a non-violent way to enforce the revanchist territorial...


Under pressure from Nazi Germany, the First Slovak Republic, led by the clerical fascist leader Jozef Tiso, declared its independence from Czechoslovakia in 1939. However, the government was strongly influenced by Germany and gradually became a puppet regime. An anti-Nazi resistance movement launched a fierce armed insurrection, known as the Slovak National Uprising, in 1944. A bloody German occupation and a guerilla war followed. Most Jews were deported from the country and taken to German concentration camps during the Holocaust. Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... ... Clerical fascism is an ideological construct that combines the political and economic doctrines of fascism with theology or religious tradition. ... Josef Tiso in photo Monsignor Jozef Tiso (October 13, 1887–April 18, 1947) was a Roman Catholic priest who became a deputy of the Czechoslovak parliament, a member of the Czechoslovak government, and finally the President of Independent Slovak Republic from 1939-1945, allied with Nazi Germany. ... A puppet state is a state whose government, though notionally of the same culture as the governed people - owes its existence (or other major debt) to being installed, supported or controlled by a more powerful entity, typically a foreign power. ... Combatants Nazi Germany Slovakia Commanders Heinrich Himmler Ferdinand ÄŒatloÅ¡ Ján Golian† Rudolf Viest† Strength 40,000, later increased to 83,000 18,000 initially, later increased to 78,000 Casualties ≈10,000 ≈10,000 + 5,304 captured and executed Memorial of the Slovak National Uprising in Banska Bystrica The... “Shoah” redirects here. ...


After World War II, Czechoslovakia was reconstituted and Jozef Tiso was hanged in 1947 for collaboration with Nazism. More than 76,000 Hungarians[2] and 32,000 Germans[3] were forced to leave Slovakia, in a series of population transfers initiated by the Allies at the Potsdam Conference. [4] This expulsion is still a source of tension between Slovakia and Hungary.[5] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Germans expelled from the Sudetenland // The expulsion of Germans after World War II refers to the forced migration of people considered Germans (Reichsdeutsche and some Volksdeutsche) from various European states and territories during 1945 and in the first three years after World War II 1946-48. ... Harry S. Truman and Joseph Stalin meeting at the Potsdam Conference on July 18, 1945. ...


Czechoslovakia came under the influence of the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact after a coup in 1948. The country was occupied by the Warsaw Pact forces in 1968, ending a period of liberalization under the leadership of Alexander Dubček. In 1969, Czechoslovakia became a federation of the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic. Not to be confused with the Warsaw Convention, which is an agreement about airlines financial liability and the Treaty of Warsaw (1970) between West Germany and the Peoples Republic of Poland. ... People in a café watch Soviet tanks roll past The Prague Spring (Czech: Pražské jaro, Slovak: Pražská jar, Russian: пражская весна) was a period of political liberalization in Czechoslovakia starting January 5, 1968 when Alexander Dubček came to power, and running until August 20 of that year when the... Alexander Dubček (November 27, 1921 – November 7, 1992) was a Slovak politician and briefly leader of Czechoslovakia (1968-1969), famous for his attempt to reform the Communist regime (Prague Spring). ... A map displaying todays federations. ... From 1969 to 1990, the Slovak Socialist Republic (Slovenská socialistická republika in Slovak; abbreviated SSR) was the official name of that part of Czechoslovakia that is Slovakia today. ...


The end of Communist rule in Czechoslovakia in 1989, during the peaceful Velvet Revolution, was followed once again by the country's dissolution, this time into two successor states. In July 1992 Slovakia, led by Prime Minister Vladimír Mečiar, declared itself a sovereign state, meaning that its laws took precedence over those of the federal government. Throughout the Autumn of 1992, Mečiar and Czech Prime Minister Václav Klaus negotiated the details for disbanding the federation. In November the federal parliament voted to dissolve the country officially on December 31, 1992. Slovakia and the Czech Republic went their separate ways after January 1, 1993, an event sometimes called the Velvet Divorce. Slovakia has remained a close partner with the Czech Republic and other countries within the Visegrad Group. Slovakia became a member of the European Union in May 2004. Non-violent protesters face armed policemen The Velvet Revolution (Czech: , Slovak: ) (November 16 – December 29, 1989) refers to a non-violent revolution in Czechoslovakia that saw the overthrow of the Communist government there;[1] it is seen as one of the most important of the Revolutions of 1989. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Succession of states. ... Vladimír Mečiar Vladimír Mečiar (born July 26, 1942) is the leader of the Peoples Party — Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (ĽS-HZDS) and a former Prime Minister of Slovakia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The dissolution of Czechoslovakia refers to the dissolution of the former country of Czechoslovakia into the nations of the Czech Republic and Slovakia, which took effect on January 1, 1993. ... Political map in 2004 The Visegrád group (also called the Visegrád 4 or V4) is an alliance of four Central European states: Poland Czech Republic Slovakia Hungary Historically, the Visegrád group originated in 1335, when the Czech, the Polish and the Hungarian king held a meeting in...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Slovakia
See also: Geomorphological division of Slovakia
A topographical map of Slovakia.
A topographical map of Slovakia.
The main ridge of the Kriváň Lesser Fatra.
The main ridge of the Kriváň Lesser Fatra.

The Slovak landscape is noted primarily for its mountainous nature, with the Carpathian Mountains extending across most of the northern half of the country. Amongst these mountain ranges are the high peaks of the Tatra mountains.[6] To the north, close to the Polish border, are the High Tatras which are a popular skiing destination and home to many scenic lakes and valleys as well as the highest point in Slovakia, the Gerlachovský štít at 2,655 metres (8,711 ft), and the country's highly symbolic mountain Kriváň. Location: Central Europe, south of Poland Geographic coordinates: 48 40 N, 19 30 E Map references: Europe Area: total: 48,845 km² land: 48,800 km² water: 45 km² Area - comparative: about twice the size of New Hampshire Land boundaries: total: 1,355 km border countries: Austria 91 km, Czech... This page gives an overview of the geomorphological division of Slovakia. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1400x962, 581 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Slovakia ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1400x962, 581 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Slovakia ... Topography, a term in geography, has come to refer to the lay of the land, or the physiogeographic characteristics of land in terms of elevation, slope, and orientation. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixels, file size: 909 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) sk: Hlavný hrebeň Krivánskej časti Malej Fatry, Slovensko. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixels, file size: 909 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) sk: Hlavný hrebeň Krivánskej časti Malej Fatry, Slovensko. ... Vrátna Valley (Vrátna dolina) near the village of Biely potok The Veľký Rozsutec Peak Lesser Fatra, Tiesňavy - Dolné diery Lesser Fatra or (other translations:) Little Fatra, Small Fatra (Slovak: Malá Fatra) is a mountain range in the Western Carpathians in northwestern central Slovakia. ... Satellite image of the Carpathians. ... Tatras Panorama of Tatras The Tatra Mountains, Tatras or Tatra (Tatry in both Slovak and Polish), constitute a mountain range which forms a natural border between Slovakia and Poland. ... Mountain huts such as this one half way up Lomnický Å¡tít are a common sight in the High Tatras. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Gerlachov Peak or Gerlachovský Peak (Slovak: Gerlachovský Å¡tít meaning peak of [the village] Gerlachov) or - based on the colloquial or old name- Gerlach Peak (Slovak:Gerlach) is the highest peak of the Tatra mountains, of Slovakia and of the whole Carpathians. ... Kriváň (2494 m) is a peak at the western border of the High Tatras in Slovakia. ...


Major Slovak rivers are the Danube, the Váh and the Hron. This article is about the Danube River. ... The Váh near PieÅ¡Å¥any. ... Hron (Hungarian: Garam, German: Gran) is a 298 km long left tributary of the Danube and the second longest river in Slovakia. ...


The Slovak climate lies between the temperate and continental climate zones with relatively warm summers and cold, cloudy and humid winters. The area of Slovakia can be divided into three kinds of climatic zones and the first zone can be divided into two sub-zones.


Climate of lowlands

Dominance of oceanic influences

The average annual temperature is about 9-10°C. The average temperature of the hottest month is about 20°C and the average temperature of the coldest month is greater than −3°C. This kind of climate occurs at Záhorská nížina and Podunajská nížina. It is the typical climate of the capital city Bratislava.[7] The Danubian Lowland (Slovak: Podunajská nížina) is the name of the part of Little Alföld (Slovak: Malá dunajská kotlina) situated between the Danube, the Little Carpathians and all the other Western Carpathians, i. ...


Climate of lowlands with dominance of continental influences

The average annual temperature is about 8–9°C. The average temperature of the hottest month is about 19°C and the average temperature of the coldest month is less than −3°C. This kind of climate can be found at Košická kotlina and Východoslovenská nížina. It is the typical climate of the city of Košice.[8]


Climate of basins

The average annual temperature is between 5°C and 8.5°C. The average temperature of the hottest month is between 15°C and 18.5°C and the average temperature of the coldest month is between −3°C and −6°C. This climate can be found in almost all basins in Slovakia. For example Podtatranská kotlina, Žilinská kotlina, Turčianska kotlina, Zvolenská kotlina. It is the typical climate for the towns of Poprad[9] and Sliač.[10] Poprad (Hungarian: , German: ) is a city in northern Slovakia at the foot of the High Tatra Mountains. ... Sliač (Hungarian: Szliács) is a small town located in the hearth of Slovakia (between Banská Bystrica and Zvolen). ...


Mountain climate

The average annual temperature is less than 5°C. The average temperature of the hottest month is less than 15°C and the average temperature of the coldest month is less than −5°C. This kind of climate occurs in mountains and in some villages in the valleys of Orava and Spiš. Orava is the name of: A historic administrative county (comitatus) of the Kingdom of Hungary (see Orava (county)) A river in Slovakia (see Orava (river) A castle in Slovakia (see Orava (castle)) A reservoir in Slovakia (see Orava (reservoir)) A village in Estonia (see Orava (village)) This is a disambiguation... SpiÅ¡ in Slovakia SpiÅ¡ (-Slovak; Latin: Scepusium, Polish: Spisz, German: , Hungarian: Szepesség) is a region in north-eastern Slovakia, with a very small area in south-eastern Poland. ...


Demographics

The majority of the inhabitants of Slovakia are ethnically Slovak (85.8%). Hungarians are the largest ethnic minority (9.7%). Other ethnic groups, as of the 2001 census, include Roma with 1.7%, Ruthenians or Ukrainians with 1%, and other or unspecified, 1.8%.[6] The majority of the 5. ... The Roma people (pronounced rahma, singular Rom, sometimes Rroma, and Rrom) along with the closely related Sinti people are commonly known as Gypsies in English, and as Tsigany in most of Europe. ... Rusyns, also called Ruthenians, Ruthenes, Rusins, Carpatho-Rusins, and Russniaks, are a modern group of ethnic groups that speak the Rusyn language and are descended from the minority of Ruthenians who did not adopt a Ukrainian national identity and become Ukrainians in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ...


The official state language is Slovak, a member of the Slavic Language Family, but Hungarian is also widely spoken in the south of the country and enjoys a co-official status in some municipalities, and many people also speak Czech.  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup...


The Slovak constitution guarantees freedom of religion. The majority of Slovak citizens (68.9 %) identify themselves with Roman Catholicism (although church attendance is lower); the second-largest group are people without confession (13%). About 6.93% belong to Lutheranism, 4.1% are Greek Catholic, affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church, Calvinism has 2.0%, other and non-registered churches 1.1% and some (0.9%) are Eastern Orthodox. About 2,300 Jews remain of the large estimated pre-WWII population of 90,000.[11] This article is about the current constitution of Slovakia. ... The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen guarantees freedom of religion, as long as religious activities do not infringe on public order in ways detrimental to society. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Calvinism... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ...


In 2007 Slovakia was estimated to have a fertility rate of 1.33.[12] (i.e., the average woman will have 1.33 children in her lifetime), which is one of the lowest numbers among EU countries. The (total) fertility rate of a population is the average number of child births per woman. ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Slovakia
See also: List of rulers of Slovakia, List of Prime Ministers of Slovakia, and List of Presidents of Slovakia

Slovakia is a parliamentary democratic republic with a multi-party system. The last parliamentary elections were held on June 17, 2006 and two rounds of presidential elections took place on April 3, 2004 and April 17, 2004. Politics of XX takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Prime Minister of Slovakia is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... Notes: A stands for the house of Arpád M stands for the house of Mojmír In the 10th to 12th century, only app. ... // Vavro Å robár (4 November 1918 – 14 November 1918) – ceased with the adoption of the Czechoslovak constitution Antonín JanouÅ¡ek (20 June 1919 – 7 July 1919) Ján Drobný (1 July 1928 - 1929) Jozef Országh (1929 - 1938) Julián Å imko (1938 - 1939) Jozef Tiso (7 October 1938 – 9... Flag of the President of Slovakia This is a list of the Presidents of Slovakia. ... The Grassalkovich Palace The Grassalkovich Palace (in Slovak Grasalkovičov palác) or the Presidential Palace (Prezidentský palác) is a palace in Bratislava and the seat of the President of Slovakia. ... , Nickname: Beauty on the Danube, City of peace Country  Slovakia Region Districts 5  - Bratislava I  - Bratislava II  - Bratislava III  - Bratislava IV  - Bratislava V Rivers Elevation 134 m (440 ft) Coordinates , Highest point Devínska Kobyla  - elevation 514 m (1,686 ft) Lowest point Danube River  - elevation 126 m (413 ft... The 2006 parliamentary elections in Slovakia will take place on Saturday June 17, 2006. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidential elections were held in Slovakia on April 3 (first round) and April 17 (second round) 2004. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Slovak head of state is the president (Ivan Gašparovič, 2004 - 2009), elected by direct popular vote for a five-year term. Most executive power lies with the head of government, the prime minister (Robert Fico, 2006 - 2010), who is usually the leader of the winning party, but he/she needs to form a majority coalition in the parliament. The prime minister is appointed by the president. The remainder of the cabinet is appointed by the president on the recommendation of the prime minister. For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... Ivan GaÅ¡parovič (born March 27, 1941), Slovak politician and law professor, became President of Slovakia on June 15, 2004. ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... Robert Fico (15 September 1964 in Topoľčany) is the current Prime Minister of Slovakia (since July 4, 2006). ... A coalition is an alliance among entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ...


Slovakia's highest legislative body is the 150-seat unicameral National Council of the Slovak Republic (Národná rada Slovenskej republiky). Delegates are elected for a four-year term on the basis of proportional representation. Slovakia's highest judicial body is the Constitutional Court of Slovakia (Ústavný súd), which rules on constitutional issues. The 13 members of this court are appointed by the president from a slate of candidates nominated by parliament. A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... Building of the National Council of the Slovak Republic next to the Bratislava Castle The National Council of the Slovak Republic (in Slovak: Národná rada Slovenskej republiky, often just: Národná rada, abbr. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ...


Slovakia is a member state of the European Union since May 1, 2004 and of NATO since March 29, 2004. As a member of the United Nations (since 1993), Slovakia was, on October 10, 2005, for the first time elected to a two-year term on the UN Security Council (for 2006-2007). Slovakia is also a member of WTO, OECD, OSCE, and other international organizations. is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... For other uses of the initials WTO, see WTO (disambiguation). ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ...


Regions and districts

As for administrative division, Slovakia is subdivided into 8 kraje (singular - kraj, usually translated as regions, but actually meaning rather county), each of which is named after its principal city. Regions have enjoyed a certain degree of autonomy since 2002. Their self-governing bodies are referred to as Self-governing (or autonomous) Regions (sg. samosprávny kraj, pl. samosprávne kraje) or Upper-Tier Territorial Units (sg. vyšší územný celok, pl. vyššie územné celky, abbr. VÚC). Since 1949 (except 1990-1996) , Slovakia has been divided into a number of kraje (singular kraj; usually translated as Regions with capital R). ... An okres (in English district) is an administrative unit in Slovakia. ... A kraj (plural: kraje) is the highest-level administrative unit in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and historically in Czechoslovakia. ...

  1. Bratislava Region (Bratislavský kraj) (capital Bratislava)
  2. Trnava Region (Trnavský kraj) (capital Trnava)
  3. Trenčín Region (Trenčiansky kraj) (capital Trenčín)
  4. Nitra Region (Nitriansky kraj) (capital Nitra)
  5. Žilina Region (Žilinský kraj) (capital Žilina)
  6. Banská Bystrica Region (Banskobystrický kraj) (capital Banská Bystrica)
  7. Prešov Region (Prešovský kraj) (capital Prešov)
  8. Košice Region (Košický kraj) (capital Košice)

(the word kraj can be replaced by samosprávny kraj or by VÚC in each case) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Bratislava region The Bratislava Region (Slovak: Bratislavský kraj) is one of the administrative regions of Slovakia. ... , Nickname: Beauty on the Danube, City of peace Country  Slovakia Region Districts 5  - Bratislava I  - Bratislava II  - Bratislava III  - Bratislava IV  - Bratislava V Rivers Elevation 134 m (440 ft) Coordinates , Highest point Devínska Kobyla  - elevation 514 m (1,686 ft) Lowest point Danube River  - elevation 126 m (413 ft... Trnava Region The Trnava Region (Slovak: Trnavský kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. ... Trnava (Hungarian: Nagyszombat, German: Tyrnau) is a town in western Slovakia, 45 kilometers to the north-east of Bratislava, on the Trnávka river, and at the main Bratislava-Žilina railway and Bratislava-Žilina limited-access highway. ... Trenčín Region The Trenčín Region (Slovak: Trenčiansky kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. ... Trenčín (Hungarian: Trencsén, German: Trentschin, Latin: Laugaricio) is a town in western Slovakia (close to the Czech border) at the Váh river. ... Nitra Region The Nitra Region (Slovak: Nitriansky kraj) is one of the administrative regions of Slovakia. ... Nitra - City Center Nitra (German: ( ); Hungarian: / Nyitria [archaic]) is a city in western Slovakia (and the fourth largest urban settlement in Slovakia) situated at the foot of Zobor Mountain in the Nitra River valley. ... Žilina Region The Žilina Region (Slovak: Žilinský kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. ... Žilina (German: Sillein, Hungarian: Zsolna, Polish: Å»ylina) is a city in northwestern Slovakia. ... Banská Bystrica Region The Banská Bystrica Region (Slovak:Banskobystrický kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. ... Banská Bystrica (German: Neusohl, Hungarian: Besztercebánya) is a town in central Slovakia, in the Hron river valley, surrounded by the mountains Nízke Tatry, Veľká Fatra, and Kremnické vrchy. ... 7: PreÅ¡ov Region The PreÅ¡ov Region (in Slovak: PreÅ¡ovský kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. ... PreÅ¡ov city centre Torysa riverbank in PreÅ¡ov Cathedral of PreÅ¡ov Neptune‘s fountain on the Hlavná Street in PreÅ¡ov PreÅ¡ov (Hungarian: Eperjes, German: Preschau or Eperies, Polish: Preszów, Rusyn: Пряшів /Пряшyв , Romany: Peryeshis) is a town in eastern Slovakia. ... 8: KoÅ¡ice Region The KoÅ¡ice Region (Slovak: KoÅ¡ický kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. ... Location of KoÅ¡ice in Slovakia Coordinates: , Country Slovakia Region KoÅ¡ice Region Districts KoÅ¡ice I-IV City parts First mentioned 1230 Government  - Type City Council  - Mayor FrantiÅ¡ek Knapík Area  - City 243. ...


The "kraje" are subdivided into many okresy (sg. okres, usually translated as districts). Slovakia currently has 79 districts. Okres (Czech and Slovak term meaning district in English; from Old Slavic окрьсть - around) refers to an administrative entity in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. ...


In terms of economics and unemployment rate, the western regions are richer than eastern regions; however the relative difference is no bigger than in most EU countries having regional differences. Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Unemployment rates in the United States. ...

See also: List of traditional regions of Slovakia and List of tourism regions of Slovakia

These traditional regions of Slovakia are mostly former counties of the Kingdom of Hungary, but also some other regions. ... There are the following official regions for the purposes of tourism in Slovakia: Division until 2004 The districts (okresy) completely or partly included in the regions are indicated in brackets: Bratislava and surroundings (Bratislava, Malacky, Pezinok, Senec) Záhorie (Malacky, Myjava, Senica, Skalica) Podunajsko [ Danube River region ] (Dunajská Streda, Galanta...

Economy

One of the forthcoming Slovak euro coins
Main article: Economy of Slovakia

Slovakia has pursued a difficult transition from a centrally planned economy to a modern market economy. Major privatizations are nearly complete, the banking sector is almost completely in private hands, and foreign investment has picked up. Slovak euro coins are euro coins intended to represent Slovakia when the country adopts the euro in 2009. ... Headquarters of Slovakias central bank in Bratislava Slovakia is a middle size economy of central Europe. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ...


Slovakia is characterized by the sustained high economic growth. In 2006, Slovakia reached the highest growth of GDP (8.9%) among the members of OECD. The annual GDP growth in 2007 is estimated at 10,4%, with the record level of 14,3% reached in the fourth quarter.[13] World GDP/capita changed very little for most of human history before the industrial revolution. ... GDP is an acronym which can stand for more than one thing: (in economics) an abbreviation for Gross Domestic Product. ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...


Unemployment, peaking at 19.2% at the end of 2001, decreased to 8.9% in March 2007.[14] In addition to the economic growth, migration of workers to other EU countries also contributed to this reduction. The unemployment rate still remains among the highest in the EU. CIA figures for world unemployment rates, 2006 Unemployment is the state in which a person is without work, available to work, and is currently seeking work. ...


Inflation dropped from an average annual rate of 12.0% in 2000 to just 3.3% in the election year 2002, but it rose again in 2003-2004 because of increases in taxes and regulated prices. It reached 3.7 % in 2005.


Slovakia plans to adopt the Euro currency on 1 January 2009 and has already entered the ERM II for this purpose (see Slovak euro coins). For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...  Eurozone countries  ERM II countries  other EU countries  unilaterally adopted euro The European Exchange Rate Mechanism, ERM, was a system introduced by the European Community in March 1979, as part of the European Monetary System (EMS), to reduce exchange rate variability and achieve monetary stability in Europe, in preparation for... Slovak euro coins are euro coins intended to represent Slovakia when the country adopts the euro in 2009. ...


Slovakia is an attractive country for foreign investors mainly because of its lower labour cost, low tax rates and well educated labour force. In recent years, Slovakia has been pursuing a policy of encouraging foreign investment. FDI inflow grew more than 600% from 2000 and cumulatively reached an all-time high of $17.3 billion USD in 2006, or around $18,000 per capita by the end of 2006. This article is about economics. ...


Despite a sufficient number of researchers and a solid secondary educational system, Slovakia, along with other post-communist countries, still faces many challenges in the field of modern knowledge economy. The business and public research and development expenditures are well below the EU average. The Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the OECD, currently ranks the Slovak secondary education as the 30th in the world (placing it just below the United States and just above Spain).[15] A knowledge economy is either economy of knowledge focused on the economy of the producing and management of knowledge, or a knowledge-based economy. ... The phrase research and development (also R and D or, more often, R&D), according to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, refers to creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society, and the use... The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a triennial world-wide test of 15-year-old schoolchildrens scholastic performance, the implementation of which is coordinated by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...


In March 2008, the Ministry of Finance announced that Slovakia's economy is developed enough to stop being an aid receiver from the World Bank. Slovakia will become an aid provider by the end of 2008.[16] The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ...

High Tatras.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1321x500, 186 KB) Summary Author: Ján Ťažký; Original URL: http://nemcok. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1321x500, 186 KB) Summary Author: Ján Ťažký; Original URL: http://nemcok. ... Mountain huts such as this one half way up Lomnický štít are a common sight in the High Tatras. ...

Tourism

Main article: Tourism in Slovakia

Slovakia features natural landscapes, mountains, caves, medieval castles and towns, folk architecture, spas and ski resorts. Tourism in Slovakia is tourism of the European nation of Slovakia. ... There are more than 2,400 caves in Slovakia, out of which more than 400 have been explored so far. ... This is a list of castles in Slovakia. ... Ski and winter sports in Slovakia are very prominent and popular given the mountanous topography of the region and the fact that much of the country is covered by snow for a greater part of the year. ...


International rankings

Map of Economic Freedom released by the Heritage Foundation. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ... World map of the 2006-2007 Global Competitiveness Index. ... Overview of the index of perception of corruption, 2006 Since 1995, Transparency International has published an annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI)[1] ordering the countries of the world according to the degree to which corruption is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians.[2] The organization defines corruption as... Leaning Tower of Pisa. ...

See also

Culture

Slovakia Portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... // Vlado Bahna Stanislav Barabáš Paľo Bielik Eduard Grečner Dušan Hanák Elo Havetta Juraj Herz Martin Hollý Juraj Jakubisko Ján Kadár Otakar Krivánek Viktor Kubal Leopold Lahola Andrej Lettrich Miroslav Luther Juraj Nvota Stanislav Párnický Peter Solan Martin Šulík Štefan Semjan Štefan... // Music has long occupied an important and distinguished place in Slovak cultural life. ... Slovak literature is the literature of Slovakia. ... The Slovak language (slovenčina, slovenský jazyk), sometimes referred to as Slovakian, is an Indo-European language belonging to the West Slavic languages (together with Czech, Polish, Kashubian and Sorbian). ... Slovak cuisine varies slightly from region to region. ... The valaška is a long, thin and light axe used in the past centuries by Slovaks in the rural parts of the country as a weapon or a tool. ...

Holidays

National holidays in Slovakia See also Remembrance days in Slovakia. ... Remembrance Days in Slovakia are working days. ...

Miscellaneous topics

Telephones - main lines in use: 1. ... Education in Slovakia consists of a free education system based on 9 years of compulsory school attendance. ... Slovakia is a member of NATO and the European Union since 2004. ... Canada is the country widely known for introducing the game of ice hockey to the world. ... Slovakia A comprehensive list of villages and municipalities by region in Slovakia. ... This is a list of the major rivers that flow through Slovakia and their lengths. ... Notes: A stands for the house of Arpád M stands for the house of Mojmír In the 10th to 12th century, only app. ... This is a list of Slovaks. ... There are the following official regions for the purposes of tourism in Slovakia: Division until 2004 The districts (okresy) completely or partly included in the regions are indicated in brackets: Bratislava and surroundings (Bratislava, Malacky, Pezinok, Senec) Záhorie (Malacky, Myjava, Senica, Skalica) Podunajsko [ Danube River region ] (Dunajská Streda, Galanta... This is a list of cities and towns in Slovakia. ... These traditional regions of Slovakia are mostly former counties of the Kingdom of Hungary, but also some other regions. ... The armed forces of the Slovak Republic number about 27,000 uniformed personnel and comprise: Land Forces - largely made up of two mechanized infantry brigades, one artillery brigade, and an immediate reaction battalion Air and Air Defense Forces - comprising one wing of fighters, one wing of attack and utility helicopters... Protected areas of Slovakia are areas that need protection because of their environmental, historical or cultural value to the nation. ... Railways: total: 3,660 km broad gauge: 102 km 1. ...

References

  1. ^ Academia Istropolitana. City of Bratislava (February 14, 2005). Retrieved on January 5, 2008.
  2. ^ Management of the Hungarian Issue in Slovak Politics
  3. ^ Nemecká menšina na Slovensku po roku 1918 (in Slovak)
  4. ^ Rock, David; Stefan Wolff (2002). Coming home to Germany? : the integration of ethnic Germans from central and eastern Europe in the Federal Republic. New York; Oxford: Berghahn. 
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ a b Slovakia. The World Factbook. CIA (2007). Retrieved on 12-31-2007.
  7. ^ Bratislava at euroWEATHER
  8. ^ Košice at euroWEATHER
  9. ^ Poprad at euroWEATHER
  10. ^ Sliač at euroWEATHER
  11. ^ Vogelsang, Peter; Brian B. M. Larsen (2002). Deportations. The Danish Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Retrieved on 02-13-2007.
  12. ^ Central Intelligence Agency. "World Fact Book", 13 December 2007. Retrieved on Jan. 4, 2008. 
  13. ^ "Gross domestic product in the 4th quarter of 2007", Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic, 3 March 2008. 
  14. ^ Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic
  15. ^ Range of rank on the PISA 2006 science scale at OECD
  16. ^ Slovakia Is Sufficiently Developled to Offer Aid Within World Bank at TASR

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... CIA redirects here. ...

Further reading

  • Pavel Dvorak: The Early History of Slovakia in Images ISBN 80-85501-34-1
  • Julius Bartl and Dusan Skvarna: Slovak History: Chronology & Lexicon ISBN 086-5164444
  • Olga Drobna, Eduard Drobny and Magdalena Gocnikova: Slovakia: The Heart of Europe ISBN 086-5163197
  • Karen Henderson: Slovakia: The Escape from Invisibility ISBN 0415274362
  • Stanislav Kirschbaum: A History of Slovakia : The Struggle for Survival ISBN 0312161255
  • Alfred Horn: Insight Guide: Czech & Slovak Republics ISBN 088-7296556
  • Rob Humphreys: The Rough Guide to the Czech and Slovak Republics ISBN 1858289041
  • Michael Jacobs: Blue Guide: Czech and Slovak Republics ISBN 0393319326
  • Neil Wilson, Richard Nebesky: Lonely Planet World Guide: Czech & Slovak Republics ISBN 1864502126
  • Eugen Lazistan, Fedor Mikovič, Ivan Kučma and Anna Jurečková: Slovakia: A Photographic Odyssey ISBN 086-5165173
  • Lil Junas: My Slovakia: An American's View ISBN 8070906227

External links

Find more about Slovakia on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

General

Travelling

Statistics

News

  • The Slovak Spectator, English-speaking news magazine
  • Slovakia today, English-language online newspaper
Geographic locale
International organizations


  Results from FactBites:
 
Slovakia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2117 words)
The Slavic population settled in the territory of Slovakia in the 5th century.
In 2004 Slovakia had a fertility rate of 1.25 (i.e., the average woman will have 1,25 children in her lifetime), which is one of the lowest numbers among EU countries.
Slovakia is a member state of the European Union since May 1, 2004 and of NATO since March 29, 2004.
Slovakia - definition of Slovakia in Encyclopedia (1284 words)
Slovakia was part of the center of Samo's empire in the 7th century.
In 1918, Slovakia joined with the regions of Bohemia and neighbouring Moravia to form Czechoslovakia, a country that lasted until it was broken up by the Munich Agreement of 1938.
Slovakia would like to adopt the Euro currency in January 2009, although the public sector deficit needs to be cut in the draft budget from its current 3.8 percent of GDP to below 3 percent in order for this to be possible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m