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Encyclopedia > Sloth
Sloths [1]
Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth(Bradypus variegatus)Lake Gatun, Republic of Panama.
Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth
(Bradypus variegatus)
Lake Gatun, Republic of Panama.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Subclass: Theria
Infraclass: Eutheria
Superorder: Xenarthra
Order: Pilosa
Suborder: Folivora
Delsuc, Catzeflis, Stanhope, and Douzery, 2001
Families

Bradypodidae
Megalonychidae
and see text Sloth may refer to: Look up sloth in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 642 KB) Three-toed-sloth (Bradypus infuscatus), Lake Gatun, Republic of Panama photographed 15th October 2003 Photographer: Stefan Laube Uploaded in German WP: 02:26, 2. ... Binomial name Bradypus variegatus Schinz, 1825 Range map in green The Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth, Bradypus variegatus, is a species of sloth from Central and South America. ... Lake Gatún is an artificial lake situated in the Republic of Panama. ... Motto: Latin: Pro Mundi Beneficio (English: For the Benefit of the World) Anthem: Himno Istmeño Capital Panama City Largest city Panama City Official language(s) Spanish (official), English and indigenous languages on the Caribbean coast Government constitutional democracy  - President Martín Torrijos Independence    - from Spain November 28, 1821   - from... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Infraclasses Metatheria Eutheria This article is about the subclass of mammals. ... Orders[1] Bobolestes Eomaia Maelestes Montanalestes Murtoilestes Prokennalestes Placentalia Superorder Xenarthra: Cingulata (Armadillos) Pilosa (Sloths, True Anteaters) Superorder Afrotheria: Afrosoricida (Tenrecs, etc. ... Orders and suborders Order Pilosa Suborder Vermilingua Suborder Folivora Order Cingulata See text for more details The superorder Xenarthra is a group of placental mammals (infraclass Eutheria), extant today only in the Americas. ... Families Bradypodidae Megalonychidae Cyclopedidae Myrmecophagidae The order Pilosa is a group of placental mammals, extant today only in the Americas. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ... Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized South American mammals belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Xenarthra. ... Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized South American mammals belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Xenarthra. ...

The living sloths comprise 6 species of medium-sized mammals that live in Central and South America belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Pilosa. Most scientists call the sloth suborder Folivora, while some call it Phyllophaga. Both names mean "leaf-eaters"; the first is derived from Latin, the second from ancient Greek. For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ... Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized South American mammals belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Xenarthra. ... Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized South American mammals belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Xenarthra. ... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... Families Bradypodidae Megalonychidae Cyclopedidae Myrmecophagidae The order Pilosa is a group of placental mammals, extant today only in the Americas. ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Beginning of Homers Odyssey The Ancient Greek language is the historical stage of the Greek language[1] as it existed during the Archaic (9th–6th centuries BC) and Classical (5th–4th centuries BC) periods in Ancient Greece. ...


This article mainly deals with the living tree-dwelling sloths. Until geologically recent times, large ground sloths such as Megatherium[2] lived in South America and parts of North America, but along with many other animals they disappeared immediately after the arrival of humans on the continent.[citation needed] Much evidence suggests that human hunting contributed to the extinction of the American megafauna, like that of far northern Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and Madagascar. Simultaneous climate change that came with the end of the last Ice Age may have also played a role in some cases. However, the fact that ground sloths survived on the Antilles long after they had died out on the mainland points towards human activities as the agency of extinction. Families Megalonychidae †Megatheriidae †Mylodontidae †Orophodontidae †Scelidotheriidae and see text Ground sloths are a diverse group of extinct sloths, mammals in the edentate superorder Xenarthra. ... Megatheriinae were a subfamily of elephant-sized ground sloths that lived from 2 million to 8,000 years ago. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... North American redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Charismatic megafauna be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Species The ground sloths of the genus Megalocnus were among the largest of the Caribbean ground sloths, with individuals estimated to weigh up to 200 pounds when alive. ... The Antilles (the same in French; Antillas in Spanish; Antillen in Dutch) refers to the islands forming the greater part of the West Indies in the Caribbean Sea. ...

Contents

Ecology

The living sloths are omnivores. They may eat insects, small lizards and carrion, but their diet consists mostly of buds, tender shoots, and leaves, mainly of Cecropia trees. They have made extraordinary adaptations to an arboreal browsing lifestyle. Leaves, their main food source, provide very little energy or nutrition and do not digest easily: sloths have very large, specialized, slow-acting stomachs with multiple compartments in which symbiotic bacteria break down the tough leaves. As much as two-thirds of a well-fed sloth's body-weight consists of the contents of its stomach, and the digestive process can take a month or more to complete. Crows are omnivores. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Symphypleona - globular springtails Subclass Archaeognatha (jumping bristletails) Subclass Dicondylia Monura - extinct Thysanura (common bristletails) Subclass Pterygota Diaphanopteroidea - extinct Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Blattodea (cockroaches) Mantodea (mantids) Isoptera (termites) Zoraptera Grylloblattodea Dermaptera (earwigs) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets... For other uses, see Lizard (disambiguation). ... An American Black Vulture feeding on squirrel carrion For other uses, see Carrion (disambiguation). ... The Acropolis of Athens, seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west The Acropolis of Athens, seen from the north, with the restored Stoa of Attalus in the foreground The south wall of the Acropolis of Athens, seen from the Theatre of Dionysus The Acropolis of Athens, seen... The kinkajou is an arboreal mammal. ... In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ... Common Clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) in their Magnificent Sea Anemone (Heteractis magnifica) home. ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ...


Even so, leaves provide little energy, and sloths deal with this by a range of economy measures: they have very low metabolic rates (less than half of that expected for a creature of their size), and maintain low body temperatures when active (30 to 34 degrees Celsius or 86 to 93 degrees Fahrenheit), and still lower temperatures when resting. Structure of the coenzyme adenosine triphosphate, a central intermediate in energy metabolism. ...


Although unable to survive outside the tropical rainforests of South and Central America, within that environment sloths are outstandingly successful creatures: they can account for as much as half the total energy consumption and two-thirds of the total terrestrial mammalian biomass in some areas.[citation needed] Of the six living species, only one, the Maned Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus torquatus), has a classification of "endangered" at present. The ongoing destruction of South America's forests, however, may soon prove a threat to other sloth species. For the use of the term in ecology, see Biomass (ecology). ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Illiger, 1811 Range map in red The Maned Three-toed Sloth, also known as an Ai, Bradypus torquatus, is a species of three-toed South American sloth. ...


Physiology

Hoffman's Two-toed Sloth, Choloepus hoffmanni.
Hoffman's Two-toed Sloth, Choloepus hoffmanni.

Sloth fur exhibits specialized functions: the outer hairs grow in a direction opposite from that of other mammals. In most mammals, hairs grow toward the extremities, but because sloths spend so much time with their legs above their bodies, their hairs grow away from the extremities in order to provide protection from the elements while the sloth hangs upside down. In moist conditions, the fur hosts two species of symbiotic cyanobacteria, which may provide camouflage. The outer fur coat is usually a thick brown, but occasionally wild sloths appear to have a green tinge to their fur because of the presence of these bacteria. The bacteria provide nutrients to the sloth when licked during grooming. Sloths have short, flat heads, big eyes, a short snout, long legs, and tiny ears. They also exhibit stubby tails, usually 6-7cm long. Altogether, sloths' bodies usually are anywhere between 50 and 60 cm long. Image File history File links Choloepus_hoffmanni. ... Image File history File links Choloepus_hoffmanni. ... Binomial name Choloepus hoffmanni Peters, 1859 The Hoffmanns Two-toed Sloth, Choloepus hoffmanni, is a species of Sloth from Central and South America. ... For other uses, see Symbiosis (disambiguation). ... Orders The taxonomy is currently under revision. ...


Sloths' claws serve as their only natural defense. A cornered sloth may swipe at its attackers in an effort to scare them away or wound them. Despite sloths' apparent defenselessness, predators do not pose special problems: in the trees sloths have good camouflage and, moving only slowly, do not attract attention. Only during their infrequent visits to ground level do they become vulnerable. The main predators of sloths are the jaguar, the harpy eagle, and humans. The majority of sloth deaths in Costa Rica are from contact with electrical lines and from poachers. Despite their adaptation to living in trees, sloths make competent swimmers. Their claws also provide a further unexpected deterrent to human hunters - when hanging upside-down in a tree they are held in place by the claws themselves and often do not fall down even if shot from below. keels is bent and she has a big nose which she picks every day. ... Binomial name Harpia harpyja (Linnaeus, 1758) The name harpy eagle usually refers to the neotropical eagle, Harpia harpyja (see below for other birds called harpy eagles). ...

Pale-throated Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus tridactylus) in a Costa Rican rehabilitation center.
Pale-throated Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus tridactylus) in a Costa Rican rehabilitation center.

Sloths move only when necessary and even then very slowly: they have about half as much muscle tissue as other animals of similar weight. They can move at a marginally higher speed if they are in immediate danger from a predator (4.5 m / 15 feet per minute), but they burn large amounts of energy doing so. Their specialized hands and feet have long, curved claws to allow them to hang upside-down from branches without effort. While they sometimes sit on top of branches, they usually eat, sleep, and even give birth hanging from limbs. They sometimes remain hanging from branches after death. On the ground their maximum speed is 1.5 m (5 feet) per minute. They mostly move at 15-30 cm (0.5-1 feet) per minute.[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1343 KB)three toed sloth at a rehabilitation center in Costa Rica Photo by Connor Lee File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1343 KB)three toed sloth at a rehabilitation center in Costa Rica Photo by Connor Lee File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Binomial name Bradypus tridactylus Linnaeus, 1758 The Pale-throated Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus tridactylus) is a three-toed sloth that inhabits tropical rainforests from southern Central America to north-eastern Argentina. ...


It had been thought that sloths were among the most somnolent animals, sleeping from 15 to 18 hours each day. Recently, however, Dr. Neil Rattenborg and his colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Starnberg, Germany, published a study testing sloth sleep-patterns in the wild; this is the first study of its kind. The study indicated that sloths sleep just under 10 hours a day.[3] They are particularly partial to nesting in the crowns of palm trees where they can camouflage as coconuts. They come to the ground to urinate and defecate only about once a week.


Infant sloths normally cling to their mother's fur, but occasionally fall off. Sloths are very sturdily built and rarely die from a fall. In some cases they die from a fall indirectly because the mothers prove unwilling to leave the safety of the trees to retrieve the young. Females normally bear one baby every year, but sometimes sloths' low level of movement actually keeps females from finding males for longer than one year.


Classification

The living sloths belong to one of two families, known as the Megalonychidae ("two-toed" sloths) and the Bradypodidae (three-toed sloths). All living sloths have in fact three toes; the "two-toed" sloths, however, have only two fingers. Two-toed sloths are generally faster moving than three-toed sloths. Both types tend to occupy the same forests: in most areas, one species of three-toed sloth and one species of the larger two-toed type will jointly predominate. Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized South American mammals belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Xenarthra. ... Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized South American mammals belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Xenarthra. ... This article is about the body part. ... For other uses, see Finger (disambiguation). ...


But their adaptations belie the actual relationships of the living sloth genera, which are more distant from each other than their outward similarity suggests. The two-toed sloths of today are far more closely related to one particular group of ground sloths than to the living three-toed sloths. Whether these ground-dwelling Megalonychidae were descended from tree-climbing ancestors or whether the two-toed sloths are really miniature ground sloths converted (or reverted) to arboreal life cannot presently be determined to satisfaction. The latter possibility seems slightly more likely, given the fact that the small ground sloths Acratocnus and Synocnus which were also able to climb are among the closer relatives of the two-toed sloths, and that these together were related to the huge ground sloths Megalonyx and Megalocnus. The eye is an adaptation. ... In biology, a genus (plural genera) is a grouping in the classification of living organisms having one or more related and morphologically similar species. ... Species Acratocnus is an extinct genus of ground sloth found in Cuba, Hispanola and Puerto Rico. ... The Synocnus was a form of ground sloth which was about the size of a medium-sized dog and weighed approximately about 50 pounds. ... Families Rathymotheriidae Scelidotheriidae Mylodontidae Orophodontidae Megalonychidae Megatheriidae Ground sloths are extinct edentate (Order Xenarthra) mammals that are believed to be relatives of tree sloths and three-toed sloths. ... Species The ground sloths of the genus Megalocnus were among the largest of the Caribbean ground sloths, with individuals estimated to weigh up to 200 pounds when alive. ...


The evolutionary history of the three-toed sloths is not at all well-known. No particularly close relatives, ground-dwelling or not, have yet been identified. This article is about evolution in biology. ...


It remains to be said that the ground sloths do not constitute a monophyletic group. Rather, they make up a number of lineages, and as far as is known until the Holocene most sloths were in fact ground-dwellers. The famous Megatherium for example belonged to a lineage of ground sloths that was not very close to the living sloths and their ground-living relatives like the small Synocnus or the massive Megalonyx. Meanwhile, Mylodon, among the last ground sloths to disappear, was only most distantly related to either of these. In phylogenetics, a group is monophyletic (Greek: of one stem) if all organisms in that group are known to have developed from a common ancestral form, and all descendants of that form are included in the group. ... The Holocene epoch is a geological period, which began approximately 11,550 calendar years BP (about 9600 BC) and continues to the present. ... Megatheriinae were a subfamily of elephant-sized ground sloths that lived from 2 million to 8,000 years ago. ... The Mylodon was a smaller breed of ground sloth, approximately ox-sized, related to the Megatherium and modern three-toed sloths and two-toed sloths. ...

  • ORDER PILOSA[1]
    • Suborder Folivora
      • Family Bradypodidae
        • Genus Bradypus (Three-toed sloths)
          • Pygmy Three-toed Sloth, Bradypus pygmaeus
          • Maned Three-toed Sloth, Bradypus torquatus
          • Pale-throated Three-toed Sloth, Bradypus tridactylus
          • Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth, Bradypus variegatus
      • Family Megalonychidae
        • Genus Choloepus (Two-toed sloths)
          • Linnaeus's Two-toed Sloth, Choloepus didactylus
          • Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloth, Choloepus hoffmanni
    • Suborder Vermilingua (anteaters and tamanduas)

Families Bradypodidae Megalonychidae Cyclopedidae Myrmecophagidae The order Pilosa is a group of placental mammals, extant today only in the Americas. ... Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized South American mammals belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Xenarthra. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Binomial name Bradypus pygmaeus Anderson & Handley 2001 The Pygmy Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus pygmaeus) is a newly discovered three-toed sloth. ... Binomial name Illiger, 1811 Range map in red The Maned Three-toed Sloth, also known as an Ai, Bradypus torquatus, is a species of three-toed South American sloth. ... Binomial name Bradypus tridactylus Linnaeus, 1758 The Pale-throated Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus tridactylus) is a three-toed sloth that inhabits tropical rainforests from southern Central America to north-eastern Argentina. ... Binomial name Bradypus variegatus Schinz, 1825 Range map in green The Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth, Bradypus variegatus, is a species of sloth from Central and South America. ... Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized South American mammals belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Xenarthra. ... Species Choloepus didactylus Choloepus hoffmanni The two extant species of two-toed sloths are Linnaeuss and Hoffmanns Two-toed Sloth. ... Binomial name Choloepus didactylus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Bradypus didactylus Linnaeus, 1758 Linnaeuss Two-toed Sloth (Choloepus didactylus), also known as the Southern Two-toed Sloth, is a species of sloth from South America, found in Venezuela, the Guianas and Brazil north of the Amazon River. ... Binomial name Choloepus hoffmanni Peters, 1858 The Hoffmanns Two-toed Sloth, Choloepus hoffmanni, is a species of sloth from Central and South America. ... Families Cyclopedidae Myrmecophagidae Anteaters are the 4 mammal species of the suborder Vermilingua commonly known for eating ants and termites. ... For other uses, see Anteater (disambiguation). ... Species Tamandua tetradactyla Tamandua mexicana Tamandua is a genus of anteaters. ...

Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b Gardner, Alfred (November 16, 2005). in Wilson, D. E., and Reeder, D. M. (eds): Mammal Species of the World, 3rd edition, Johns Hopkins University Press, 100-101. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
  2. ^ Wildfacts Megatherium. BBC Science & Nature. Retrieved on 2007-01-09.
  3. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7396356.stm BBC News Article "Sloth's Lazy Image 'A Myth'"

For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Look up sloth in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
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Folivora
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Families Bradypodidae Megalonychidae Cyclopedidae Myrmecophagidae The order Pilosa is a group of placental mammals, extant today only in the Americas. ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Orders[1] Bobolestes Eomaia Maelestes Montanalestes Murtoilestes Prokennalestes Placentalia Superorder Xenarthra: Cingulata (Armadillos) Pilosa (Sloths, True Anteaters) Superorder Afrotheria: Afrosoricida (Tenrecs, etc. ... Orders and suborders Order Pilosa Suborder Vermilingua Suborder Folivora Order Cingulata See text for more details The superorder Xenarthra is a group of placental mammals (infraclass Eutheria), extant today only in the Americas. ... For other uses, see Anteater (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Cyclopes didactylus (Linnaeus, 1758) Silky Anteater or Pygmy Anteater (Cyclopes didactylus) is a species of anteater from Central and South America ranging from extreme southern Mexico south to Brazil and, possibly, Paraguay. ... Binomial name Cyclopes didactylus (Linnaeus, 1758) Silky Anteater or Pygmy Anteater (Cyclopes didactylus) is a species of anteater from Central and South America ranging from extreme southern Mexico south to Brazil and, possibly, Paraguay. ... Binomial name Cyclopes didactylus (Linnaeus, 1758) Silky Anteater or Pygmy Anteater (Cyclopes didactylus) is a species of anteater from Central and South America ranging from extreme southern Mexico south to Brazil and, possibly, Paraguay. ... Genera Myrmecophaga Tamandua Cyclopes Anteaters are mammals of the order Xenarthra and the family Myrmecophagidae, commonly known for eating ants and termites. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Giant Anteater, Myrmecophaga tridactyla, is the largest species of anteater. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Giant Anteater, Myrmecophaga tridactyla, is the largest species of anteater. ... Species Tamandua tetradactyla Tamandua mexicana Tamandua is a genus of anteaters. ... Binomial name Tamandua tetradactyla Linnaeus, 1758 Southern Tamandua or Lesser Anteater, Tamandua tetradactyla, is a species of anteater from South America. ... Binomial name Tamandua tetradactyla Linnaeus, 1758 Southern Anteater or Lesser Anteater, Tamandua tetradactyla, is a species of Anteater from South America. ... Green: , Blue: , Red: Species Bradypus pygmaeus Bradypus torquatus Bradypus tridactylus Bradypus variegatus The three-toed sloths are the only members of the Bradypus genus and the Bradypodidae family. ... Green: , Blue: , Red: Species Bradypus pygmaeus Bradypus torquatus Bradypus tridactylus Bradypus variegatus The three-toed sloths are the only members of the Bradypus genus and the Bradypodidae family. ... Binomial name Bradypus pygmaeus Anderson & Handley 2001 The Pygmy Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus pygmaeus) is a newly discovered three-toed sloth. ... Binomial name Illiger, 1811 Range map in red The Maned Three-toed Sloth, also known as an Ai, Bradypus torquatus, is a species of three-toed South American sloth. ... Binomial name Bradypus tridactylus Linnaeus, 1758 The Pale-throated Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus tridactylus) is a three-toed sloth that inhabits tropical rainforests from southern Central America to north-eastern Argentina. ... Binomial name Bradypus variegatus Schinz, 1825 Range map in green The Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth, Bradypus variegatus, is a species of sloth from Central and South America. ... Species Choloepus didactylus Choloepus hoffmanni The two extant species of two-toed sloths are Linnaeuss and Hoffmanns Two-toed Sloth. ... Species Choloepus didactylus Choloepus hoffmanni The two extant species of two-toed sloths are Linnaeuss and Hoffmanns Two-toed Sloth. ... Binomial name Choloepus didactylus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Bradypus didactylus Linnaeus, 1758 Linnaeuss Two-toed Sloth (Choloepus didactylus), also known as the Southern Two-toed Sloth, is a species of sloth from South America, found in Venezuela, the Guianas and Brazil north of the Amazon River. ... Binomial name Choloepus hoffmanni Peters, 1858 The Hoffmanns Two-toed Sloth, Choloepus hoffmanni, is a species of sloth from Central and South America. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sloth - MSN Encarta (408 words)
Sloth, common name for certain slow-moving arboreal mammals that inhabit the tropical forests of South and Central America.
Sloths are divided into two groups: the three-toed sloths, among which is the ai, and the two-toed sloths, among which is the unau.
The tail is small in three-toed sloths and absent or vestigal in two-toed sloths.
Sloth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (975 words)
Sloths are medium-sized mammals that live in South America and Central America belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Pilosa.
sloths are very funny they tell yo mamma jokes and hang out with micheal jackson and in neverland Sloth fur also exhibits specialized functions: the outer hairs grow in the opposite direction to that of other mammals, i.e.
The main predators of sloths are the jaguar, the harpy eagle, and humans.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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