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Encyclopedia > Sloop
For the military definition of sloop see: Sloop-of-war.
The sail plan of a typical sloop, with a gaff rig on the mainsail
The sail plan of a typical sloop, with a gaff rig on the mainsail
For the open learning project see: SLOOP Project.

A sloop (from Dutch sloep) is a sailboat with a fore-and-aft rig and a single mast farther forward than the mast of a cutter. A sloop's fore-triangle is smaller than a cutter's, and a sloop usually bends only one headsail, though this distinction is not definitive. Unlike cutters, sloops usually have only one headsail, though some sloops such as the Friendship Sloop have more than one. Ultimately position of the mast is the most important factor.[attribution needed] Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... USS Constellation, a United States Navy sloop-of-war. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A sail-plan is a formal set of drawings, usually prepared by a naval architect. ... Gaff rig is a sailing rig in which the mainsail is a four-cornered fore-and-aft rigged sail controlled at its head by a spar called the gaff. ... A mainsail is the most important sail raised from the main (or only) mast of a sailing vessel. ... SLOOP is an e-Learning and OpenContent project, funded by the European Commission. ... Diagram of Sailboat, in this case a typical monohull sloop with a bermuda or marconi rig. ... A fore-and-aft rig is a sailing rig consisting mainly of sails that are set along the line of the keel rather than perpendicular to it. ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... For other uses see cutter (disambiguation) An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... A headsail is any sail set forward of the foremost mast of a sailing vessel. ... The Friendship Sloop is a style of gaff-rigged sailboat originated in Friendship, Maine around 1880. ...


On a gaff rigged, single masted boat, the clearest distinction between a sloop and a cutter is the run of the forestay. On the sloop, it runs to the outboard end of the bowsprit, which means that spar must always stay in position and cannot be retracted. On the cutter, the forestay runs to the stem head of the hull. This allows the bowsprit to be run back inboard and stowed. This can be helpful in crowded harbours or when stowing the jib in strong wind conditions.[attribution needed] For other uses see cutter (disambiguation) An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... On a sailing vessel, a forestay is a piece of standing rigging which keeps a mast from falling backwards. ... Bowsprit of the Falls of Clyde, showing the dolphin striker, the use of chain for the bobstays, and three furled jibs. ...

Contents

Rationale behind the sloop rig

Typical Bermuda rigged sloop
Typical Bermuda rigged sloop

No design is perfect for all conditions; sloops are designed to optimize upwind sailing. However, sloops also offer an excellent overall compromise acceptable, if not optimal, to all points of sail. It is clear that the most difficult direction to sail is to the windward (known as sailing close-hauled); this requires some specific design features. The sail should be as vertical as possible to optimize the energy of the wind. In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack... Points of sail is the term used to describe a sailing boats course in relation to the wind direction. ...


Two forces act on a vessel to push it from vertical (also known as heeling over): (1) the weight of the rig itself will tend to heel the boat, and (2) the sideways force of the wind on the sails. The sloop is a light rig with fewer lines and spars, and the sails on a sloop tend to be flat which minimizes sideways force when well trimmed. The heeling forces are also counterbalanced by the keel, which uses weight and hydrodynamics to offset the forces from the rigging and sails. For other uses, see Keel (disambiguation). ...


When sailing upwind, it is also important to minimize the drag of the wind on the sail and rig. A major cause of drag of the sail is a vortex of turbulent air generated by the top of the mast and sail. Secondary causes are non-optimal aerodynamic shapes of masts, stays and control lines. The sloop minimizes the drag of the tip-vortex with a high and narrow sail design (high aspect), maximizing the amount of sail for a given tip-vortex compared to a square-rigged or gaff-rigged ship. Also, the simplicity of the rig reduces the drag induced by control lines, masts and spars. Vortex created by the passage of an aircraft wing, revealed by coloured smoke A vortex (pl. ... In fluid dynamics, turbulence or turbulent flow is a flow regime characterized by chaotic, stochastic property changes. ...


Sails carried

A sloop-rigged J-24 sailboat

To maximize the amount of sail carried, the classical sloop may use a bowsprit, which is essentially a fixed spar that projects forward from the bow of the boat. For downwind sailing, the typical foresail may be replaced (or sometimes supplemented) by larger sails known as spinnakers or gennakers. The typical foresail known as the jib, which does not overlap the mast more than 10 to 20 percent, may be replaced by a genoa jib, which overlaps the mast by as much as 55 to 100 percent for racing rules and sometimes more. The mainsail and Genoa form an efficient double wing. Sailing sloop Photo Credit:US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration http://gimp-savvy. ... Sailing sloop Photo Credit:US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration http://gimp-savvy. ... Bowsprit of the Falls of Clyde, showing the dolphin striker, the use of chain for the bobstays, and three furled jibs. ... A foresail refers to one of several types of sail set on the foremost mast (foremast) of a sailing vessel: Any triangular sail set forward of the foremast, such as a jib. ... For other uses, see Spinnaker (disambiguation). ... A gennaker is a downwind sail that can be described as a cross between a genoa and a spinnaker. ... For other uses, see Jib (disambiguation). ... A genoa (pronounced like the city, or as jenny) is a type of large headsail used on bermuda rigged craft, commonly the single-masted sloop and twin-masted boats such as yawl and ketch. ...


The Bermuda Sloop

Main article: Bermuda sloop

The modern yachting sloop is known as the Bermuda sloop, due to its Bermuda rig (also known as the Marconi rig, due to its resemblance to the wireless towers of Guglielmo Marconi), which is the optimal rig for upwind sailing; consequently sloops are popular with sport sailors and yachtsmen, and for racing. The rig is simple in its basic form, yet when tuned properly it is maneuverable and fast. The main disadvantage is the relatively large size of the sails, especially on larger vessels. It is also less successful sailing downwind; the addition of a spinnaker is necessary for reasonable downwind speed in all but the strongest winds, and the spinnaker is an intrinsically unstable sail requiring continual trimming. 1831 painting of a three-masted Bermuda sloop of the Royal Navy, entering a West Indies port. ... In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack... For the inventor of radio,Marconi see the competing claims in history of radio and the invention of radio. ... For other uses, see Spinnaker (disambiguation). ...


The Bermuda sloop is a type of fore-and-aft rigged sailing vessel developed on the island of Bermuda in the 17th century. In this sense, the term applied to small ships, rather than boats. In its purest form, it is single-masted, although ships with such rigging were built with as many as three masts. Its original form had gaff rig, but evolved to use what is now known as Bermuda rig, making it the basis of nearly all modern sailing yachts. Although the Bermuda sloop is often described as a development of the narrower-beamed Jamaica sloop, which dates from the 1670s, the high, raked masts, and triangular sails of its Bermuda rig are rooted in a tradition of Bermudian boat design dating from the early 17th century. Part of that tradition included long, horizontal bowsprits, and large jibs. Three jibs were commonly used on Bermudian ships. Triangular sails appeared on Bermudian boats early in the 17th century, a development of the Dutch bezaan, or leg-of-mutton rig, itself derived from the Lateen rig. This became the Bermuda rig, and was appearing on Bermudian ships by the early 19th century. A large spinnaker was carried on a spinnaker boom when running down-wind. Gaff rig is a sailing rig in which the mainsail is a four-cornered fore-and-aft rigged sail controlled at its head by a spar called the gaff. ... In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack... A lateen (from Latin) is a triangular sail set on a long yard mounted at an angle on the mast, and running in a fore-and-aft direction. ...


Historic naval definition

A three-masted Bermuda sloop of the Royal Navy, ca. 1831. Also called Ballyhou schooners, the RN referred to these as sloops-of-war.
A three-masted Bermuda sloop of the Royal Navy, ca. 1831. Also called Ballyhou schooners, the RN referred to these as sloops-of-war.

The naval term "sloop" referred to ships with different rigs and sizes varying from navy to navy. "Sloop-of-war" was more of a reference to the purpose of the craft rather than the specific size or sailplan. The Royal Navy began buying Bermuda sloops, beginning with an order for three sloops-of-war (HMS Dasher, HMS Driver, and HMS Hunter, were each of 200 tons, armed with twelve 24 pounders) placed with Bermudian builders in 1795 [1]. They were intended to counter the then-extant menace of French privateers, which the Navy's ships-of-the-line were ill-designed to counter. Eventually, Bermuda sloops became the standard advice vessels of the navy, used for communications, reconnoitering, anti-slaving, anti-smuggling, and other roles to which they were well suited. The most notable examples of these were HMS Pickle, which raced back to England with news of the British victory and the death of Admiral Lord Nelson at the end of the Battle of Trafalgar, and HMS Whiting (79 tons and four guns), which lowered anchor in the harbor of Hampton Roads on 8 July 1812, carrying dispatches. The American privateer Dash, which happened to be leaving port, seized the vessel. The crew of the Whiting had not yet received news of the American declaration of war, and her capture was the first naval action of the American War of 1812. Generally a sloop was smaller than a frigate; however, in the later days of the U.S. Navy's sailing fleet, some of the largest vessels were called sloops because they carried fewer guns than a frigate, as few as 20. The classification of sloop was similar to a corvette. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1831 painting of a three-masted Bermuda sloop of the Royal Navy, entering a West Indies port. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... USS Constellation, a United States Navy sloop-of-war. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... 1831 painting of a three-masted Bermuda sloop of the Royal Navy, entering a West Indies port. ... HMS Dasher (D37) was a Royal Navy aircraft carrier, of the Avenger class - converted merchant vessels - and one of the shortest lived escort carriers. ... For other uses, see Privateer (disambiguation). ... HMS Victory in 1884, the only surviving example of a ship-of-the-line. ... HMS Pickle was a 10-gun cutter of the Royal Navy. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... Combatants United Kingdom First French Empire Kingdom of Spain Commanders Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson † Pierre Charles Silvestre de Villeneuve Strength 27 ships of the line and 6 others. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... USN redirects here. ... French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate and larger than a coastal patrol craft. ...


Modern Naval Definition

In modern use, a sloop refers to a warship between a corvette and a frigate in size. Such vessels were common during the age of steam, but ships of this type were becoming obsolete by the Second World War. The Royal Navy used sloops, such as those of the Flower Class [2], for numerous roles, including escort duty and anti-submarine warfare, during the Great War. The same was true during the Second World War, when the Royal Navy used the Black Swan class, but for many years, now, its smallest warships have been frigates (not including fishery patrol vessels and offshore patrol vessels, like the Peacock Class [3]). French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate and larger than a coastal patrol craft. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Black Swan class and Modified Black Swan class were two classes of sloop of the Royal Navy and Royal Indian Navy. ...


Modern civilian connotation

Sloops in their modern form were developed by the French Navy as blockade runners to circumvent Royal Navy blockades. They were later adapted to pilot boats (small ships that take a pilot out to a ship to guide it into a harbor). Later still, they were adapted to smaller revenue cutters. The French Navy, officially called the National Navy (French: Marine Nationale) is the maritime arm of the French military. ... A blockade runner is a ship designed to provide vital supplies to countries or areas blockaded by enemy forces during wartime. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... A blockade is any effort to prevent supplies, troops, information or aid from reaching an opposing force. ... For other uses, see Harbor (disambiguation). ...


The first modern sloops were fitted with the Bermuda Rig, so called as a result of its development in Bermuda during the 17th century. This rig is also called the Marconi rig because of the resemblance of its tall mast and complex standing rigging to Guglielmo Marconi's wireless (radio) transmission antennas. In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack... For the inventor of radio,Marconi see the competing claims in history of radio and the invention of radio. ... For other uses, see Wireless (disambiguation). ...


The state of the art in racing sloops today may be seen in the IACC yachts sailed in the America's Cup competition. This statement is only true in that the most money has been spent in this class, to build the fastest boats that meet the IACC rule. Much faster sloops have been built that don't fit the rule, using such forbidden technology as canting keels and movable water ballast. The current Volvo Ocean Race is using a new class, the Volvo 70 which boasts a canting keel, carbon construction throughout and very powerful sailplans. The 24-hour distance record was recently broken several times, with ABN AMRO 2 setting the record distance of 563 nautical miles (1,043 km) for a monohull (January 2006). These boats routinely sail at or above wind speeds and can sustain mid-20-knot (37 km/h) speeds hour after hour. The Americas Cup is the most famous trophy in the sport of yachting, and the oldest active trophy in sports. ... This article is about the yachting competition. ... Volvo Ocean Race 2005 - 2006 logo Volvo Ocean Race (formerly the Whitbread Round the World Race) is a yacht race around the world, held every four years. ...


The largest yachting sloop built to date is Mirabella V, with a carbon-fiber mast that is 289 feet (90 m) high. Mirabella V is a sloop-rigged super yacht launched in 2003. ... Tail of a RC helicopter, made of CFRP Carbon fiber reinforced plastic or (CFRP or CRP), is a very strong, light and expensive composite material or fiber reinforced plastic. ...


See also

  • Sailboat
  • Bermuda rig, also called a Marconi rig, the most common of the sloop rigs
  • Bermuda sloop gaff or Bermuda rigged vessels built in Bermuda from the 17th to 19th Centuries
  • Friendship Sloop, a traditional gaff-rigged sloop developed for the Maine lobster fishery
  • Sloop John B, a traditional song about an ill-fated trip on the eponymous vessel, made famous by the Beach Boys
  • Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, A traditional sloop launched in 1969 to promote environmental awareness
  • Mast aft rig, a single mast rig with a mast further back than a sloop or cutter

Diagram of Sailboat, in this case a typical monohull sloop with a bermuda or marconi rig. ... In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack... 1831 painting of a three-masted Bermuda sloop of the Royal Navy, entering a West Indies port. ... The Friendship Sloop is a style of gaff-rigged sailboat originated in Friendship, Maine around 1880. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gaff rig. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Subfamilies and Genera Neophoberinae Acanthacaris Thymopinae Nephropsis Nephropides Thymops Thymopsis Nephropinae Homarus Nephrops Homarinus Metanephrops Eunephrops Thymopides Clawed lobsters comprise a family (Nephropidae, sometimes also Homaridae) of large marine crustaceans. ... Sloop John B is the seventh track on The Beach Boys Pet Sounds album and was also a single which was released in 1966 on Capitol Records. ... It has been suggested that Sloop Clearwater, Clearwater Festival be merged into this article or section. ... A mast aft rig is a sailboat sail-plan that uses a single mast set in the aft half of the hull to support a jib or multiple staysails, with either a small or completely absent mainsail. ...

External links

For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The barca longa was a two or three-masted lugger found on the coasts of Spain and Portugal as well as more widely in the Mediterranean Sea. ... A barc is a type of sailing vessel. ... This article is about the ship. ... In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack... A Bilander, also spelled billander or belandre, was a small European merchant ship with two masts, used in the Netherlands for coast and canal traffic and occasionally seen in the North Sea but more frequently to be seen in the Mediterranean Sea. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Brigantine. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... Caravela Latina / Latin Caravel Caravela Redonda / Square-rigged Caravel A caravel is a small, highly maneuverable, two or three-masted ship used by the Portuguese and Spanish for long voyages of exploration beginning in the 15th century. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... The occupied boats are catboats, but with a mast and boom rig A catboat (alternate spelling: cat boat), or a cat-rigged sailboat, is a sailing vessel characterized by a single mast carried well forward (, near the front of the boat). ... A model of a vessel of the clipper type, the four-masted barque named Belle Étoile A clipper was a very fast multiple-masted sailing ship of the 19th century. ... While the majority of the clipper ships sailed under British and American flags, more then a hundred clippers were built in the Netherlands. ... Excavated cog from 1380 Cogs or rather cog-built vessels came into existence around 12th century AD. They were cheracterized by flush-laid flat bottom at midships but gradually shifted to overlapped strakes near the posts. ... French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate and larger than a coastal patrol craft. ... For other uses see cutter (disambiguation) An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... A Dhow near Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. ... For the fictional moon, see Felucca (Ultima). ... A postcard showing the St. ... Dutch fluyts of 17th Century A fluyt or a flute (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel originally designed as a dedicated cargo vessel. ... A fore-and-aft rig is a sailing rig consisting mainly of sails that are set along the line of the keel rather than perpendicular to it. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a square rigged sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. ... Gaff rig is a sailing rig in which the mainsail is a four-cornered fore-and-aft rigged sail controlled at its head by a spar called the gaff. ... The galeas is a small type of trade ship, which was common in the Baltic Sea and North Sea during the 17th to the early 20th centuries. ... Galiot in Willaumezs Dictionnaire de la Marine Galiots (or galliots) were types of ships from the Age of Sail. ... A Spanish galleon. ... In sailing, a gunter is a wire that leads from one end of a gaff to the other. ... A hermaphrodite brig, or brig-schooner, is a type of two-masted sailing ship which has square sails on the foremast combined with a schooner rig on the mainmast (triangular topsail over a gaff mainsail). ... A hoy was a small sloop-rigged coasting ship or a heavy barge used for freight. ... A jackass-barque, sometimes spelled jackass bark, is a sailing ship with 3 (or more masts), of which the foremast is square-rigged and the main is partially square-rigged (topsail, topgallant, etc. ... A junk is a Chinese sailing vessel. ... Square Topsl Gaff Ketch Hawaiian Chieftain on San Francisco Bay A ketch is a sailing craft with two masts: A main mast, and a mizzen mast abaft the main mast. ... The Oseberg longship (Viking Ship Museum, Norway) Oseberg longship from the front, one of the most stunning expressions of Norse art and craftsmanship A longship tacking in the wind Longships were ships primarily used by the Scandinavian Vikings and the Saxons to raid coastal and inland settlements during the European... // For the bird of prey, see Laggar Falcon. ... A mast aft rig is a sailboat sail-plan that uses a single mast set in the aft half of the hull to support a jib or multiple staysails, with either a small or completely absent mainsail. ... A Mersey flat is a two masted, doubled-ended barge with rounded bilges, carvel build and fully decked. ... A multihull is a ship or boat with more than one hull. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... The Norfolk wherry is a black-sailed trader, type of boat on the Norfolk Broads and Suffolk Broads, now part of The Broads National Park, in Norfolk, England. ... There are two classifications of Pink. ... A pocket cruiser, microcruiser or pocket yacht is a small, often lightweight sailboat with a cabin, which is intended for recreational cruising (either overnight or for extended periods) of the owners chosen waterways. ... A polacca is a type of seventeenth-century sailing vessel, similar to the xebec. ... A pram or pramm was a type of shallow-draught flat-bottomed ship used in Europe during the 18th century, particularly in the Baltic Sea during the Great Northern War and Napoleonic Wars, as the prams shallow draught allowed it to approach the shore. ... R. M. Munroes 1898 proa A Proa is a multihull vessel consisting of two (usually) unequal parallel hulls, superficially similar to an outrigger canoe. ... Punting while dressed for Cambridge graduation This article concentrates on the history and development of punts and punting in England, for other usages see the disambiguation pages at punt and punter. ... A sailing hydrofoil is a sailboat with wing-like foils mounted under the hull. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... The sixareen or Sixern (Norwegian: Seksring meaning six-oared), is a clinker built boat, evolved as a larger version of the Yoal, when the need arose for crews to fish further from shore. ... USS Constellation, a United States Navy sloop-of-war. ... The Smack was a English sailing vessel that was used to bring the fish to Market for most of the 19th Century and even in small numbers up to the Second World War. ... This article is about snow, the merchant vessel. ... Main-mast of a square-rigged ship, with all square sails set except the course. ... The USCGC Eagle. ... The distinctive sailing barges that were once a common sight on Londons River Thames, were commercial craft relying on sail power alone. ... Photograph of an Orma 60 trimaran in Sandhamn before the Round Gotland Race 2005 A trimaran is a multihull boat consisting of a main hull (vaka) and two smaller outrigger hulls (amas), attached to the main hull with lateral struts (akas). ... A traditional boat found in the southern Philippine island of Mindanao characterized by a colorful sail of assorted vertical colors. ... A wherry (meaning boat) is a boat used for carrying cargo on rivers and canals in England. ... A windjammer is a type of sailing ship with a large iron hull, usually used for cargo in the nineteenth century. ... A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing jibe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii. ... XEBEC is a subsidiary of the anime studio Production I.G. that specialises in the production of television anime. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Yawl sailing vessel. ... The Yoal, often referred to as the Ness Yoal, is a clinker built craft used traditionally in the Shetland Islands. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sloop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (980 words)
In sailing, a sloop is a vessel with a Fore-and-aft rig.
To maximize the amount of sail carried, the classical sloop may use a bowsprit, which is essentially a fixed spar that projects forward from the bow of the boat.
Sloops in their modern form were developed by the French to run British blockades.
Sloop - definition of Sloop in Encyclopedia (769 words)
In sailing, a sloop is a vessel with a single mast on which is hoisted a fore-and-aft rigged mainsail and a single jib, plus extras such as a spinnaker.
To maximize the amount of sail carried, the classical sloop may use a bowsprit, which is essentially a fixed boom that projects from the front of the boat.
The state of the art in racing sloops today may be seen in the 12-meter yachts sailed in the America's Cup competition.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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