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Encyclopedia > Sleeping Beauty
Sir Edward Burne-Jones painted The Sleeping Beauty.
Sir Edward Burne-Jones painted The Sleeping Beauty.

Sleeping Beauty ("La Belle au Bois dormant" (The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood)) is a fairy tale classic, the first in the set published in 1697 by Charles Perrault, Contes de ma Mère l'Oye ("Mother Goose Tales").[1] Sleeping Beauty by Sir Edward Burne-Jones, from the Briar Rose series 4 Image source: http://209. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... Sleeping Beauty may refer to one of the following. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... This article is about the French author. ...


While Perrault's version is better known, an older variant, the tale Sun, Moon, and Talia, was contained in Giambattista Basile's Pentamerone (published 1634).[2] Professor J. R. R. Tolkien noted that Perrault's cultural presence is so pervasive that, when asked to name a fairy tale, most people will cite one of the eight stories in Perrault's collection.[3] Since Tolkien's generation, however, the most familiar Sleeping Beauty in the English speaking world has become the Walt Disney animated film (1959), which draws as much from the Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky ballet (Saint Petersburg, 1890) as from Perrault. Giambattista Basile (1566 or 1575–February 23, 1632) was an Italian poet, courtier, and fairy tale collector. ... Giambattista Basile (1566 or 1575–February 23, 1632) was an Italian poet, courtier, and fairy tale collector. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... Tolkien redirects here. ... “Princess Aurora” redirects here. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... The Sleeping Beauty (Russian: , Spyashchaya Krasavitsa) is a ballet in a prologue and three acts, Opus 66, by Pyotr Tchaikovsky. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ...

Contents

The Story

Once upon a time there was a Queen who had a beautiful baby daughter. She asked all the fairies in the kingdom to the christening, but unfortunately forgot to invite one of them, who was a bit of a witch as well. She came anyway, but as she passed the baby's cradle, she said:


"When you are sixteen, you will injure yourself with a spindle and die!"


"Oh, no!" screamed the Queen in horror. A good fairy quickly chanted a magic spell to change the curse. When she hurt herself, the girl would fall into a very deep sleep instead of dying.


The years went by, the little Princess grew and became the most beautiful girl in the whole kingdom. Her mother was always very careful to keep her away from spindles, but the Princess, on her sixteenth birthday, as she wandered through the castle, came into a room where an old servant was spinning.


"What are you doing?" she asked the servant.


"I'm spinning. Haven't you seen a spindle before?"


"No. Let me see it!" The servant handed the girl the spindle ... and she pricked herself with it and. with a sigh, dropped to the floor.


The terrified old woman hurried to tell the Queen. Beside herself with anguish, the Queen did her best to awaken her daughter but in vain. The court doctors and wizards were called, but there was nothing they could do. The girl could not be wakened from her deep sleep. The good fairy who managed to avoid the worst of the curse came too, and the Queen said to her,


"When will my daughter waken?"


"I don't know," the fairy admitted sadly.


"In a year's time, ten years or twenty?" the Queen went on.


"Maybe in a hundred years' time. Who knows?" said the fairy.


"Oh! What would make her waken?" asked the Queen weeplng.


"Love," replied the fairy. "If a man of pure heart were to fall in love with her, that would bring her back to life!"


"How can a man fall in love with a sleeping girl?" sobbed the Queen, and so heart-broken was she that, a few days later, she died. The sleeping Princess was taken to her room and laid on the bed surrounded by garlands of flowers. She was so beautiful, with a sweet face, not like those of the dead, but pink like those who are sleeping peacefully. The good fairy said to herself,


"When she wakens, who is she going to see around her? Strange faces and people she doesn't know? I can never let that happen. It would be too painful for this unfortunate girl."


So the fairy cast a spell; and everyone that lived in the castle - soldiers, ministers, guards, servants, ladies, pages, cooks, maids and knights - all fell into a deep sleep, wherever they were at that very moment.


"Now," thought the fairy, "when the Princess wakes up, they too will awaken, and life will go on from there." And she left the castle, now wrapped in silence. Not a sound was to be heard, nothing moved except for the clocks, but when they too ran down, they stopped, and time stopped with them. Not even the faintest rustle was to be heard, only the wind whistling round the turrets, not a single voice, only the cry of birds.


The years sped past. In the castle grounds, the trees grew tall. The bushes became thick and straggling, the grass invaded the courtyards and the creepers spread up the walls. In a hundred years, a dense forest grew up.


Now, it so happened that a Prince arrived in these parts. He was the son of a king in a country close by. Young, handsome and melancholy, he sought in solitude everything he could not find in the company of other men: serenity, sincerity and purity. Wandering on his trusty steed he arrived, one day, at the dark forest. Being adventurous, he decided to explore it. He made his way through slowly and with a struggle, for the trees and bushes grew in a thick tangle. A few hours later, now losing heart, he was about to turn his horse and go back when he thought he could see something through the trees . . . He pushed back the branches . . . Wonder of wonders! There in front of him stood a castle with high towers. The young man stood stock still in amazement,


"I wonder who this castle belongs to?" he thought.


The young Prince rode on towards the castle. The drawbridge was down and, holding his horse by the reins, he crossed over it. Immediately he saw the inhabitants draped all over the steps, the halls and courtyards, and said to himself,


"Good heavens! They're dead!" But in a moment, he realised that they were sound asleep. "Wake up! Wake up!" he shouted, but nobody moved. Still thoroughly astonished, he went into the castle and again discovered more people, lying fast asleep on the floor. As though led by a hand in the complete silence, the Prince finally reached the room where the beautiful Princess lay fast asleep. For a long time he stood gazing at her face, so full of serenity, so peaceful, lovely and pure, and he felt spring to his heart that love he had always been searching for and never found. Overcome by emotion, he went close, lifted the girl's little white hand and gently kissed it . . .


At that kiss, the prlncess qulckly opened her eyes, and wakening from her long long sleep, seeing the Prince beside her, murmured:


"Oh, you have come at last! I was waiting for you in my dream. I've waited so long!"


Just then, the spell was broken. The Princess rose to her feet, holding out her hand to the Prince. And the whole castle woke up too. Everybody rose to their feet and they all stared round in amazement, wondering what had happened. When they finally realised, they rushed to the Princess, more beautiful and happier then ever.


A few days later, the castle that only a short time before had lain in silence, now rang with the sound of singing, music and happy laughter at the great party given in honour of the Prince and Princess, who were getting married. They lived happily ever after.


Perrault's narrative

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Tales of Mother Goose
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Sleeping Beauty

The basic elements of Perrault's narrative are in two parts. Some folklorists believe that they were originally separate tales – as they became afterward, in Grimms' version – and were joined together by Basile, and Perrault following him.[4] Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... Giambattista Basile (1566 or 1575–February 23, 1632) was an Italian poet, courtier, and fairy tale collector. ...


Part one

German stamp: The wicked fairy curses the princess
German stamp: The wicked fairy curses the princess

At the christening of a long-wished-for princess, fairies invited as godmothers offered gifts, such as beauty, wit, and musical talent. However, a wicked fairy who had been overlooked placed the princess under an enchantment as her gift, saying that, on reaching adulthood, she would prick her finger on a spindle and die. A good fairy, though unable to completely reverse the spell, said that the princess would instead sleep for a hundred years, until awakened by the kiss of a prince's son. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (840x720, 415 KB) eingescannt von: User:Nightflyer eingescannt am: April 2006 Wohlfahrtsmarke aus Deutschland (1964) Ausgabepreis: 10 + 5 Pfennig First Day of Issue / Erstausgabetag: TT. MMMM JJJJ Auflage: xxx Stück Entwurf: xxx Druckverfahren: Michel-Katalog-Nr: Ländercode-MiNr: xxx... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (840x720, 415 KB) eingescannt von: User:Nightflyer eingescannt am: April 2006 Wohlfahrtsmarke aus Deutschland (1964) Ausgabepreis: 10 + 5 Pfennig First Day of Issue / Erstausgabetag: TT. MMMM JJJJ Auflage: xxx Stück Entwurf: xxx Druckverfahren: Michel-Katalog-Nr: Ländercode-MiNr: xxx... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... by Sophie Anderson For other uses, see Fairy (disambiguation). ... A godparent, in Christianity, is someone who sponsors a childs baptism. ... Carabosse as envisaged by Leon Bakst The wicked fairy godmother, a figure rare in fairy tales, is nevertheless among best-known figures from such tales, because of her appearance in one of the most widely known tales, Sleeping Beauty, and in the ballet derived from it. ... A spindle (sometimes called a drop spindle) is a wooden spike weighted at one end with a wheel and an optional hook at the other end. ... For other uses, see Sleep (disambiguation). ...

German stamp: The princess meets the old woman, spinning
German stamp: The princess meets the old woman, spinning

The king forbade spinning on distaff or spindle, or the possession of one, upon pain of death, throughout the kingdom, but all in vain. When the princess was fifteen or sixteen she chanced to come upon an old woman in a tower of the castle, who was spinning. The Princess asked to try the unfamiliar task and the inevitable happened. The wicked fairy's curse was fulfilled. The good fairy returned and put everyone in the castle to sleep. A forest of briars sprang up around the castle, shielding it from the outside world: no one could try penetrate it without facing certain death in the thorns. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (840x720, 461 KB) eingescannt von: User:Nightflyer eingescannt am: April 2006 Wohlfahrtsmarke aus Deutschland (1964) Ausgabepreis: 15 + 5 Pfennig First Day of Issue / Erstausgabetag: TT. MMMM JJJJ Auflage: xxx Stück Entwurf: xxx Druckverfahren: Michel-Katalog-Nr: Ländercode-MiNr: xxx... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (840x720, 461 KB) eingescannt von: User:Nightflyer eingescannt am: April 2006 Wohlfahrtsmarke aus Deutschland (1964) Ausgabepreis: 15 + 5 Pfennig First Day of Issue / Erstausgabetag: TT. MMMM JJJJ Auflage: xxx Stück Entwurf: xxx Druckverfahren: Michel-Katalog-Nr: Ländercode-MiNr: xxx...

Illustration by Gustave Doré: the prince finds everyone asleep at the castle.
Illustration by Gustave Doré: the prince finds everyone asleep at the castle.

After a hundred years had passed, a prince who had heard the story of the enchantment braved the wood, which parted at his approach, and entered the castle. He trembled upon seeing the princess' beauty and fell on his knees before her. He kissed her, then she woke up, then everyone in the castle woke to continue where they had left off... and, in modern versions, starting with the Brothers Grimm version, they all lived happily ever after. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 747 × 599 pixels Full resolution (800 × 642 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 747 × 599 pixels Full resolution (800 × 642 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ...


Part two

Secretly wed by the re-awakened Royal almoner, the Prince continued to visit the Princess, who bore him two children, L'Aurore (Dawn) and Le Jour (Day), which he kept secret from the Queen, who was of an Ogre lineage. Once he had acceded to the throne, he brought the Princess and the children to his capital, which he then left in the regency of the Queen Mother, while he went to make war on his neighbor the Emperor Contalabutte, ("Count of The Mount"). This article is about the mythological creature. ...


The Ogre Queen sent the Princess Queen and the children to a house secluded in the woods, and directed her cook there to prepare the boy for her dinner, with a sauce Robert. The humane cook substituted a lamb, which satisfied the Ogre Queen, who demanded the girl, but was satisfied with a young goat prepared in the same excellent sauce. When the Ogre Queen demanded that he serve up the Princess Queen, she offered her throat to be slit, so that she might join the children she imagined were dead. There was a tearful secret reunion in the cook's little house, while the Ogre Queen was satisfied with a hind prepared with sauce Robert. Soon she discovered the trick and prepared a tub in the courtyard filled with vipers and other noxious creatures. The King returned in the nick of time and the Ogress, being discovered, threw herself into the pit she had prepared and was consumed, and everyone else lived happily ever after. Sauce Robert (Brown Mustard Sauce for the English kitchen) is based on the classic long-simmered French brown sauce that coats sliced beef roasts, or leftovers, with a It is too dark and rich for sliced turkey breast, but would suit pheasant. ... This article is about the species of deer. ...


Sources

An older image of the sleeping princess: Brünnhilde, surrounded by magical fire rather than roses (illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagner's Die Walküre
An older image of the sleeping princess: Brünnhilde, surrounded by magical fire rather than roses (illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagner's Die Walküre

Perrault transformed the tone of Basile's "Sole, Luna, e Talia". Basile's was an adult tale told by an aristocrat for aristocrats, emphasizing concerns such as marital fidelity and inheritance. Perrault's is an aristocratic tale told for a high-bourgeois audience, inculcating female patience and passivity.[citation needed] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 418 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (600 × 861 pixel, file size: 128 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brünnhilde lies asleep, surrounded by magical fire. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 418 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (600 × 861 pixel, file size: 128 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brünnhilde lies asleep, surrounded by magical fire. ... An illustration from Alices Adventures in Wonderland Arthur Rackham (September 19, 1867 – September 6, 1939) was a prolific English book illustrator. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Die Walküre (The Valkyrie) is the second of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...


Beside differences in tone, the most notable differences in the plot is that the sleep did not stem from a curse, but was prophesied; that the king did not wake Talia from the sleep with a kiss, but raped her, and when she gave birth to two children, one sucked on her finger, drawing out the piece of flax that had put her to sleep, which woke her; and that the woman who resented her and tried to eat her and her children was not the king's mother but his jealous wife. The mother-in-law's jealousy is less motivated, although common in fairy tales. A self-fulfilling prophecy is a prediction that directly or indirectly causes itself to become true. ...


There are earlier elements that contributed to the tale, in the medieval courtly romance Perceforest (published in 1528), in which a princess named Zellandine falls in love with a man named Troylus. Her father sends him to perform tasks to prove himself worthy of her, and while he is gone, Zellandine falls into an enchanted sleep. Troylus finds her and gets her pregnant in her sleep; when their child is born, he draws from her finger the flax that caused her sleep. She realizes from the ring he left her that the father was Troylus; he returns after his adventures to marry her.[5] The prose romance of Perceforest with lyrical interludes of poetry, in six books, appears to have been composed in French in the Low Countries between 1330 and 1344, forming a late addition to the cycle of narratives with loose connections both to the Arthurian cycle and to the feats of... Events June 19 - Battle of Landriano - A French army in Italy under Marshal St. ...


Earlier influences come from the story of the sleeping Brynhild in the Volsunga saga and the tribulations of saintly female martyrs in early Christian hagiography conventions. It was, in fact, the existence of Brynhild that persuaded the Brothers Grimm to include Briar Rose in latter editions of their work rather than eliminate it, as they did to other works they deemed to be purely French, stemming from Perrault's work. In Norse mythology, Brünnehilde was a shieldmaiden and a Valkyrie. ... The Ramsund carving in Sweden depicts 1) how Sigurd is sitting naked in front of the fire preparing the dragon heart, from Fafnir, for his foster-father Regin, who is Fafnirs brother. ... Hagiography is the study of saints. ...

"He stands—he stoops to gaze—he kneels—he wakes her with a kiss", woodcut by Walter Crane
"He stands—he stoops to gaze—he kneels—he wakes her with a kiss", woodcut by Walter Crane

Walter Crane (August 15, 1845 - March 14, 1915) was a significant English artist. ...

Naming the princess

The princess's name has been unstable. In Sun, Moon, and Talia, she is named Talia ("Sun" and "Moon" being her twin children). Perrault removed this, leaving her anonymous, although naming her daughter "L'Aurore". The Brothers Grimm named her "Briar Rose." Tchaikovsky shifted the name of the daughter, in translation, to the mother: Aurora. This transfer was taken up by Disney in the film.[6] John Stejean named her "Rosebud" in TeleStory Presents.


Variants

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Briar Rose
"Sleeping Beauty" by Edward Frederick Brewtnall
"Sleeping Beauty" by Edward Frederick Brewtnall

This fairy tale is classified as Aarne-Thompson type 410.[7] Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 696 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (700 × 603 pixel, file size: 95 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Painter: Edward Frederick Brewtnall Title: Sleeping Beauty File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 696 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (700 × 603 pixel, file size: 95 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Painter: Edward Frederick Brewtnall Title: Sleeping Beauty File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Antti Amatus Aarne (1867 - 1925) was a Finnish folklorist, who developed the initial version of what became the Aarne-Thompson classification system of classifying folktales, first published in 1910. ...


The Brothers Grimm included a variant, Briar Rose, in their collection (1812). [8] It truncates the story as Perrault and Basile told it to the ending now generally known: the arrival of the prince concludes the tale.[9] Some translations of the Grimm tale give the princess the name Rosamond. The brothers considered rejecting the story on the grounds that it was derived from Perrault's version, but the presence of the Brynhild tale convinced them to include it as an authentically German tale. Still, it is the only known German variant of the tale, and the influence of Perrault is almost certain.[10] For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ...


The Brothers Grimm also included, in the first edition of their tales, a fragmentary fairy tale, The Evil Mother-in-Law. This began with the heroine married and the mother of two children, as in the second part of Perrault's tale, and her mother-in-law attempted to eat first the children and then the heroine. Unlike Perrault's version, the heroine herself suggested an animal be substituted in the dish, and the fragment ends with the heroine's worry that she can not keep her children from crying, and so from coming to the attention of the mother-in-law. Like many German tales showing French influence, it appeared in no subsequent edition.[11]


Italo Calvino included a variant in Italian Folktales. The cause of her sleep is an ill-advised wish by her mother: she wouldn't care if her daughter died of pricking her finger at fifteen, if only she had a daughter. As in Pentamerone, she wakes after the prince raped her in her sleep, and her children are born and one sucks on her finger, pulling out the prick that had put her to sleep. He preserves that the woman who tries to kill the children is the king's mother, not his wife, but adds that she does not want to eat them herself but serves them to the king.[12] His version came from Calabria, but he noted that all Italian versions closely followed Basile's.[13] Italo Calvino, on the cover of Lezioni americane: Sei proposte per il prossimo millennio Italo Calvino (October 15, 1923 – September 19, 1985) (pronounced ) was an Italian writer and novelist. ... Italian Folktales (Fiabe Italiane) is a collection of 200 Italian folktales published in 1956 by Italo Calvino. ... Look up Wish in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Giambattista Basile (1566 or 1575–February 23, 1632) was an Italian poet, courtier, and fairy tale collector. ...


Besides Sun, Moon, and Talia, Basile included another variant of this Aarne-Thompson type, The Young Slave. The Grimms also included a second, more distantly related one, The Glass Coffin.[14] The Young Slave is a Italian literary fairy tale written by Giambattista Basile in The Pentamerone. ... The Glass Coffin is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm, tale number 163. ...


Joseph Jacobs noted the figure of the Sleeping Beauty was in common between this tale and the Gypsy tale The King of England and his Three Sons, in his More English Fairy Tales.[15] The King of England and his Three Sons is a Gypsy fairy tale collected by Joseph Jacobs in More English Fairy Tales. ...


The hostility of the king's mother to his new bride is repeated in the fairy tale The Six Swans,[16] and also features The Twelve Wild Ducks, where she is modified to be the king's stepmother, but these tales omit the cannibalism. The Six Swans is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm. ... The Twelve Wild Ducks is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Asbjørnsen and Moe. ...


Myth themes

The tale has been interpreted as a myth of natural phenomena, especially in light of the names given Sleeping Beauty's children: Sun and Moon, Dawn and Day, are easily interpreted as figurative characters.


Some folklorists have analyzed Sleeping Beauty as indicating the replacement of the lunar year (with its thirteen months, symbolically depicted by the full thirteen fairies) by the solar year (which has twelve, symbolically the invited fairies). This, however, founders on the issue that only in the Grimms' tale is the wicked fairy the thirteenth fairy; in Perrault's, she is the eighth.[17]


Among familiar themes and elements in Perrault's tale:

  • the Wished-for Child
Further information: Saint Anne and Rapunzel
  • the Accursed Gift
Further information: Nessus and Deianira
Further information: Moirae and Norn
  • the Heroic Quest
  • the Ogre Stepmother
  • the Substituted Victim
Further information: Isaac, Jesus, Zeus, Cronos and Iphigeneia
See also: Weaving (mythology)

This article is about the mother of the Virgin Mary. ... For other uses, see Rapunzel (disambiguation). ... Guido Reni, Abduction of Deianira, 1620-21, Louvre Museum. ... Abduction of Deianira by Guido Reni, 1620–21, Louvre Deianira as painted by Evelyn De Morgan Deïaneira or Deïanira (in Greek, Δηϊάνειρα or Δῃάνειρα — she that gets the heroes) was the third wife of Heracles, best-known for her role in the story of the Tunic of Nessus. ... For other uses, see Destiny (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Fate, a disambiguation page. ... Look up Norns in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Rhea tricking Cronus with a wrapped stone. ... 112 Iphigenia is an asteroid. ... The theme of weaving in mythology is ancient, and its lost mythic lore probably accompanied the early spread of this mysterious art. ...

Modern retellings

Sleeping Beauty has been popular for many fairytale fantasy retellings. This include Mercedes Lackey's Elemental Masters novel The Gates of Sleep; Robin McKinley's Spindle's End, Orson Scott Card's Enchantment, Jane Yolen's Briar Rose, Sophie Masson's Clementine, and Anne Rice's Sleeping Beauty Series. Fairytale fantasy is a diverse subgenre of fantasy fiction, starting perhaps with Charles Perrault and other writers who took up the folktales of their time and developed them into literary forms. ... Mercedes Lackey (born June 24, 1950) (also known as Misty Lackey) is a prolific American author of fantasy novels. ... Elemental Masters is a fantasy series written by Mercedes Lackey, about an earth where magic exists and focuses on the Elemental Masters, people who have magical control over air, water, fire, or earth. ... Robin McKinley (born November 16, 1952 as Jennifer Carolyn Robin Turrell McKinley) is a fantasy author especially known for her Newbery Medal-winning novel The Hero and the Crown. ... Spindles End is a book by Robin McKinley. ... Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951)[1] is a bestselling American author, as well as being a critic, political writer, and speaker. ... Enchantment is a 1999 novel by author Orson Scott Card. ... Jane Yolens Wizards Hall Jane Yolen (born February 11, 1939 in New York City) is an American author and editor of almost 300 books. ... Sophie Masson is a French-Australian author. ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ...


The curse of the fairy godmother, by itself, has been taken from the tale and used in many contexts. George MacDonald used it in his Sleeping Beauty parody, The Light Princess, where the evil fairy godmother curses the princess not to death but to lack gravity -- leaving her both lacking in physical weight and unable to take other people's suffering seriously.[18] In Andrew Lang's Prince Prigio, the queen, who does not believe in fairies, does not invite them; the fairies come anyway and give good gifts, except for the last one, who says that he shall be "too clever" -- and the problems with such a gift are only revealed later. In Patricia Wrede's Enchanted Forest Chronicles, a princess laments that she wasn't cursed at her christening. When another character points out that many princesses aren't (even in the Chronicles' fairy-tale setting), she complains that in her case the wicked fairy did come to the christening, "had a wonderful time," and left the princess with no way to assume her proper, fairy-tale role. George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 – September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. ... The Light Princess is a fairy tale by George MacDonald. ... For the former National Basketball Association player, see Andrew Lang (basketball). ... Prince Prigio is a literary, and comic, fairy tale written by Andrew Lang and illustrated by Gordon Browne. ... Pat Wrede Patricia Collins Wrede (pronounced REED-ee) is an American fantasy writer, born 1953 in Chicago, Illinois; she is the eldest of five children. ... The Enchanted Forest Chronicles is a series of four books by Patricia C. Wrede entitled Dealing with Dragons, Searching for Dragons, Calling on Dragons, and Talking to Dragons. ...


Angela Carter's "The Bloody Chamber" provides a postmodern retelling of Sleeping Beauty entitled "The Lady of the House of Love". Although she deviates significantly from the original subject matter she keeps intact what she terms the 'latent content', for example though not actually asleep there are repeated references to the protagonist existing as a somnambulist . The story follows the life of a Transylvanian vampire condemned by her fate until a young soldier arrives who, through his innocence, frees her from her curse.


Sleeping Beauty in music

Michele Carafa composed La belle au bois dormant in 1825. Michele Enrico Carafa di Colobrano (17 November 1787 – 26 July 1872) was an Italian opera composer. ... La belle au bois dormant is an opera composed by Michele Carafa to a French libretto. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Before Tchaikovsky's version, several ballet productions were based on the "sleeping beauty" theme, amongst which one from Eugène Scribe: in the winter of 18281829, the French playwright furnished a four-act mimed scenario as a basis for Aumer's choreography of a four-act ballet-pantomime La Belle au bois dormant. Scribe wisely omitted the violence of the second part of Perrault's tale for the ballet, which was set by Hérold and first staged at the Académie Royale, Paris, April 27, 1829. Though Hérold popularized his piece with a piano Rondo brilliant based on themes from the music, he was not successful in getting the ballet staged again. The Sleeping Beauty (Russian: , Spyashchaya Krasavitsa) is a ballet in a prologue and three acts, Opus 66, by Pyotr Tchaikovsky. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... Augustin Eugène Scribe (December 24, 1791 - February 20, 1861), was a French dramatist and librettist. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Pantomime (disambiguation). ... Lithograph of Ferdinand Herold by Louis Dupré, Paris, circa 1830 Louis Joseph Ferdinand Herold[1] better known as Ferdidnand Herold (Paris, January 28, 1791–Thernes, January 19, 1833) was a French operatic composer of Alsatian descent who also wrote many pieces for the piano, orchestra, and the ballet. ... The Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture (Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture), Paris, was founded in 1648, modelled on Italian examples, such as the Accademia di San Luca in Rome. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


When Ivan Vsevolozhsky, the Director of the Imperial Theatres in Saint Petersburg, wrote to Tchaikovsky on May 25, 1888, suggesting a ballet based on Perrault's tale, he also cut the violent second half, climaxed the action with the Awakening Kiss, and followed with a conventional festive last act, a series of bravura variations. Ivan Vsevolozhsky, circa 1880 Ivan Alexandrovich Vsevolozhsky (1835 - 1909) was the Director of the Imperial Theatres in Russia from 1881 to 1898. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the ballet Theme and Variations, see Theme and Variations (ballet). ...


Although Tchaikovsky was maybe not all that eager to compose a new ballet (remembering that the reception of his Swan Lake ballet music, staged eleven seasons earlier, had only been lukewarm), he set to work with Vsevolovsky's scenario. The ballet, with Tchaikovsky's music (his Opus 66) and choreography by Marius Petipa, was premiered in the Saint Petersburg Mariinsky Theatre on January 24, 1890. The Valse des cygnes from Act II of the Ivanov/Petipa edition of Swan Lake. ... Maestro Marius Ivanovich Petipa, Maître de Ballet of the Imperial Theatres. ... The Maryinsky (or Mariinsky) Theatre (or Theater), is the St Petersburg theatre where the Mariinsky Ballet is located. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ...


Besides being Tchaikovsky's first major success in ballet composition, it set a new standard for what is now called "Classical Ballet", and remained one of the all time favourites in the whole of the ballet repertoire. Sleeping Beauty was the first ballet that impresario Sergei Diaghilev ever saw, he later recorded in his memoirs, and also the first that ballerinas Anna Pavlova and Galina Ulanova ever saw, and the ballet that introduced the Russian dancer Rudolph Nureyev to European audiences. Diaghilev staged the ballet himself in 1921 in London with the Ballets Russes. Choreographer George Balanchine made his stage debut as a gilded Cupid sitting on a gilded cage, in the last act divertissements. The Sleeping Beauty (Russian: , Spyashchaya Krasavitsa) is a ballet in a prologue and three acts, Opus 66, by Pyotr Tchaikovsky. ... Portrait of Sergei Diaghilev by Valentin Serov (1904) Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (Russian: / Sergei Pavlovich Dyagilev), also referred to as Serge, (March 31, 1872 – August 19, 1929) was a Russian art critic, patron, ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes from which many famous dancers and choreographers would later arise. ... Photographic postcard of Anna Pavlova as Aspicia in The Pharoahs Daughter, circa 1910 Anna Pavlova as Nikiya in the Grand Pas Classique of the Shades from Act III of La Bayadere, circa 1902 Anna Pavlova is also the name of an Olympic gymnast. ... Galina Sergeyevna Ulanova (Russian: ; 8 January 1910 (O.S. 26 December 1909} - 21 March 1998) has the reputation of the greatest Soviet ballerina. ... Rudolf Nureyev Rudolf Khametovich Nureyev (Russian spelling Рудольф Хаметович Нуреев, Tatar form Rudolf Xämät ulı Nuriev) (17 March 1938 – 6 January 1993), Russian-born dancer, was regarded by many critics as the greatest male dancer of the 20th century, alongside Vaslav Nijinsky and Mikhail Baryshnikov. ... Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (Сергей Павлович Дягилев) (March 19, 1872 – August 19, 1929), often known as Serge, was a Russian ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes from which many famous dancers and choreographers would later arise. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Léon Bakst: Firebird, Ballerina, 1910 There was also the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo from 1932 to 1963 The Ballets Russes was a ballet company established in 1909 by the Russian impresario Serge Diaghilev and resident first in the Théâtre Mogador and Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris... George Balanchine (January 9 (O.S.) = January 22 (N.S.), 1904–April 30, 1983) was one of the 20th centurys foremost choreographers, and one of the founders of American ballet. ...


Mimed and danced versions of the ballet survived in the distinctly British genre of pantomime, with Carabosse, the evil fairy, a famous travesti role. Carabosse as envisaged by Leon Bakst Carabosse, sometimes known as Maleficent, is the wicked fairy in the ballet and fairy story Sleeping Beauty. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Maurice Ravel's Ma Mère l'Oye includes a movement entitled Pavane de la Belle au bois dormant (Pavane of the Sleeping Beauty in the Wood). This piece was also later developed into a ballet. Maurice Ravel. ... Ma Mère lOye (Mother Goose), is a musical work by French composer Maurice Ravel. ... The pavane is a processional dance common in Europe during the 16th century, whether named from an origin in Padua (padovano), from Sanskrit meaning wind, or from the stately sweep of a ladys train likened to a peacocks tail. ...


Walt Disney's Sleeping Beauty

Walt Disney's Sleeping Beauty
Walt Disney's Sleeping Beauty

The Walt Disney Productions animated feature Sleeping Beauty was released on January 29, 1959 by Buena Vista Distribution. Disney spent nearly a decade working on the film, which was produced in the Super Technirama 70 widescreen 70 mm film process with a stereophonic soundtrack. Its musical score and songs are adapted from Tchaikovsky's ballet. This tale includes three good fairies - Flora, Fauna, and Merryweather - and one evil fairy, Maleficent. As in most Disney films, there are considerable changes made to the plot. For example; it is Maleficent herself that appears in the upper tower of the castle and creates the spinning wheel and spindle on which the princess, Aurora, pricks her finger. Image File history File links PrincessAuroraSleeping. ... Image File history File links PrincessAuroraSleeping. ... “Princess Aurora” redirects here. ... Walt Disney Productions is the former name of The Walt Disney Company, which it held from 1929 to 1986. ... Animation refers to the technique in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... “Princess Aurora” redirects here. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buena Vista production logo, 1950s. ... Super Technirama 70 was the marketing name for films which were photographed in the 35mm 8-perf Technirama process and optically enlarged to 70mm 5-perf prints for exhibition. ... The Wikipedia main page as viewed with a widescreen monitor. ... 70 mm film (or 65 mm film) is a high-resolution film stock, of superior quality to standard 35 mm motion picture film format. ... Multichannel audio is the name for a variety of techniques for expanding and enriching the sound of audio playback by recording additional sound channels that can be reproduced on additional speakers. ... Maleficent is the wicked dark fairy and main antagonist in Walt Disneys 1959 adaptation of Sleeping Beauty. ... “Princess Aurora” redirects here. ...


The film cost six million US dollars (mainly because of the amazing dragon sequence) to produce, and only returned a revenue of three million dollars, nearly bankrupting the Disney studio. The film later gained a following, and is today considered one of the best animated features ever made, due to its unique style and authentic look along with a beautiful story and lush music. A Platinum Edition of the film is due for release October 2008, though Disney has already launched the official website for the Sleeping Beauty Special Edition DVD. The Platinum Editions are a series of DVDs put out by The Walt Disney Company. ...


Uses of Sleeping Beauty

  • One of the fairy gifts is sometimes misremembered as Intelligence. No such gift was however offered in Perrault's version: not appropriate in 1697, when a good ear for playing music appeared more essential. More modern versions of the tale might include, apart from Intelligence, Courage and Independence as fairy gifts. This can be compared with the gifts Moll Flanders apparently possessed, in the book with the same name that appeared precisely a quarter of a century after Perrault's Sleeping Beauty (1722).
  • Freudian psychologists, encouraged by Bruno Bettelheim's The Uses of Enchantment, have found rich materials to analyze in Sleeping Beauty as a case history of latent female sexuality and a prescription for the passive socialization of those young women who were not destined for work.
  • Eric Berne uses this fairy tale to illustrate "Waiting for Rigor Mortis", a one of the life scripts [19]. After pointing out that almost everything in this story can actually happen, he singles out the key illusion that script protagonist fails to recognize: that the time didn't stop while she was asleep, that in reality Rose won't be fifteen years old, but thirty, forty, or fifty. Berne uses this and other fairy tales as a convenient tool to puncture the script armor that captivates people.
  • Joan Gould's book Turning Straw into Gold reclaims the story for women's agency, arguing that Sleeping Beauty is an example of a woman's ability to "turn off" in times of crisis. She cites a version of the story where the princess awakes when the prince enters the room, because she knows it's time to wake up.
  • The Princess's sleeping attendants, waiting to accompany her when she wakes in the other world, even to the spit-boys in the kitchens and her pet dog, expresses one of the most ancient themes in ritual burial practices, though Perrault was probably unaware of the Egyptian burials, and certainly unaware of the royal tombs of Queen Puabi of the Third Dynasty of Ur, the courtiers that accompanied early emperors of China in the tomb, the horses that accompanied the noble riders in the kurgans of Scythian Pasyryk. The King and Queen are not included in this analogue of a burial, but retire, while the protective spectral thorn forest immediately grows up to protect the castle and its occupants, as effective as a tumulus.[citation needed]
Further information: Grave goods
  • Sleeping Beauty appears as a character in the Fables comic book. She is one of the three ex-wives of Prince Charming, and is one of the wealthier Fables. She is still vulnerable to pricking herself, falling back into an enchanted slumber when this happens, along with all others in whatever building she is in.
  • The second half of Sleeping Beauty appears as one of the comics in Little Lit. The comic is written and drawn by famed comics author Daniel Clowes.
  • In 2002 the Dutch-speaking author Toon Tellegen published Brieven aan Doornroosje ("Letters to Sleeping Beauty"), leading, in 2005, to a year-long daily series of such letters, imagined to be written by the prince making his quest to Sleeping Beauty's castle, being presented at the Flemish classical radio station (Klara), every morning just before 7 h opening the day program.
  • In the book Sisters Grimm she is one of the people who actually do not despise Relda Grimm. She is shown as a very kind person and she has cocoa colored skin.
  • In Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales For Every Child, Sleeping Beauty's depicted as a Hispanic priness named Rosita. She was under the spell for a century
  • Caitlín R. Kiernan's "Glass Coffin" is a retelling of "Sleeping Beauty." It appears in her collection Tales of Pain and Wonder. The story's title is a reference to P. J. Harvey's song "Hardly Wait," which is itself also a reference to "Sleeping Beauty."
  • Sheri S. Tepper adapts the Sleeping Beauty story in her novel, Beauty. This novel also includes references to Cinderella and The Frog Prince.
  • Bruce Bennett adapted Sleeping Beauty into a Children's Musical with Lynne Warren, which made its world premiere at Riverwalk Theatre
  • Catherynne M. Valente adapted the story in The Maiden-Tree, in which she likens the spindle to a syringe.
  • The computer game Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne uses Sleeping Beauty as an allegory to the game's own ending when Max kisses a dead Mona Sax on the lips- accoriding to Max, "...all this time we got the story of Sleeping Beauty all wrong." He theorizes that the prince, much like Max himself, is not kissing Sleeping Beauty to wake her up, but rather to wake himself from the hope and pain that brought him there- Max states, "No one who's slept for a hundred years is likely to wake up." Though if one manages to beat the game on the hardest difficulty, Mona will wake up after the kiss, surviving in the alternate ending.
  • In philosophy, the Sleeping Beauty paradox is a thought-experiment where Beauty is given an amnesiac and put to sleep on Sunday night. A coin is flipped and if heads occurs, she will be awoken on Monday and then put back to sleep. if tails occurs, she is awoken on Monday and Tuesday. Whenever she awakes, she will be asked what her subjective probability is for the coin having landed heads. Everybody agrees that she will answer 1/2 before the experiment, but some argue that during the experiment she will answer 1/3. If that is the case then she is said to defy the Reflection Principle, commonly thought by Bayesians to be a constraint on rationality.
  • In Cardcaptor Sakura, Sakura's class performs Sleeping Beauty in the episode "Sakura and the Blacked Out School Arts Festival", with the characters chosen at random. Sakura gets the title of the Prince and Syaoran gets the title of Aurora, with Yamazaki earning the title of the witch in the manga. However, since Meilin took the role of the witch in the anime, Yamazaki became the queen which lead to Rika, who was the queen in the manga, to be one of the fairies instead of an unnamed boy.
  • In Kaori Yuki's manga, Ludwig Revolution, the queen was infertile and had Princess Friederike after a fish relayed a prophesy. Rather than meeting a servant, the princess pricked her finger when the witch told her that there had been no prophesy; instead the queen had been raped and she was not the king's daughter. Friederike touched the spindle as a way to test if the witch was telling the truth and slept for one hundred years. When Prince Ludwig meets her in his dreams, he falls in love with her and his kiss breaks the spell. They do not, however, live happily ever after, as she dies the moment she awakens.

Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders is a 1722 novel by Daniel Defoe. ... // Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... Bruno Bettelheim (August 28, 1903 - March 13, 1990) was an Austrian-born American writer and child psychologist. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... Eric Berne (May 10, 1910 – July 15, 1970) was a Canadian-born psychiatrist best known as the creator of transactional analysis and the author of Games People Play. ... Script may mean: A writing system A manuscript, scroll A draft for a book The dialog and instructions for a play, film (see screenplay), or comic book or strip; or, without dialog, the instructions for a dance routine (such as for a musical, or the ballet) A kind of computer... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... For other senses of this word, see ritual (disambiguation). ... Pu-Abi (Akkadian Word of my Father) was an important personage in the Sumerian city of Ur who lived about 2600-2500 BCE, during the First Dynasty of Ur. ... Sarmatian Kurgan 4th c. ... Approximate extent of Scythia and Sarmatia in the 1st century BC (the orange background shows the spread of Eastern Iranian languages, among them Scytho-Sarmatian). ... A tumulus (plural tumuli, from the Latin word for mound or small hill, from the root to bulge, swell also found in ) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. ... In archaeology and anthropology grave goods are the items interred along with the body. ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Claiming of Sleeping Beauty The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty (1983), Beautys Punishment (1984), and Beautys Release (1985), are erotic novels by Anne Rice writing under the pseudonym of A. N. Roquelaure. ... Anne Rice (born Howard Allen OBrien on October 4, 1941), the second daughter of an Irish Catholic family, is an author of horror/fantasy stories, often about vampires, mummies and witches. ... Fables is a Vertigo comic book series created and written by Bill Willingham. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Prince Charming meets Cinderella in a 1912 book of fairy tales. ... Cover of the second volume of Little Lit. ... Daniel Gillespie Clowes (born April 14, 1961 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-nominated American author, screenwriter and cartoonist of alternative comic books, most notably Eightball (1989-present), an anthology of self-contained narratives and serialized graphic novels (one of which, Ghost World, was published separately in 1997. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Dutch is a West Germanic, Low German language spoken worldwide by around 21 million people. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... VRT official logo The communications tower at the headquarters of VRT in Brussels. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Sleeping Beauty is a live album from Tiamat. ... Tiamat is a band that formed in Stockholm, Sweden in 1988. ... Angela Carter (May 7, 1940 – February 16, 1992) was an English novelist and journalist, known for her post-feminist magical realist and science fiction works. ... The Bloody Chamber (or The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories) is an anthology of short fiction by Angela Carter. ... Caitlín Rebekah Kiernan (born May 26, 1964 in Skerries, Dublin, Ireland) is the author of many science fiction and dark fantasy works, including six novels, many comic books, more than one hundred published short stories, novellas, and vignettes, and numerous scientific papers. ... Cover art by Richard A. Kirk Tales of Pain and Wonder (2000) is Caitlin R. Kiernans first short-story collection. ... Polly Jean Harvey, born October 9, 1969 in Weymouth, Dorset is a British singer and songwriter. ... Sheri Stewart Tepper (born July 16, 1929) is a prolific American author of science fiction, horror and mystery novels; she is particularly known as a feminist science fiction writer, often with an ecofeminist slant. ... Catherynne M. Valente (born May 5, 1979, Seattle, Washington) is an American poet, novelist and literary critic. ... This article is about the film. ... Princess Fiona is the Princess in the films Shrek, Shrek 4-D, Shrek 2, Shrek the Third, and the upcoming Shrek 4. ... For other uses, see Narcolepsy (disambiguation). ... A thought experiment (from the German term Gedankenexperiment, coined by Hans Christian Ørsted) in the broadest sense is the use of a hypothetical scenario to help us understand the way things actually are. ... Serialized in Nakayoshi Original run 1996 – 2000 Volumes 12 TV anime Director Morio Asaka Studio Madhouse Licensor Bandai Visual Geneon Nelvana Network NHK, Animax Original run April 7, 1998 – March 21, 2000 Episodes 70 Movie: Cardcaptor Sakura the Movie Director Morio Asaka Composer Takayuki Negishi Studio Madhouse Licensor Bandai Visual... Kaori Yuki (由貴 香織里 Yuki Kaori) is a manga artist (or mangaka) from Tokyo. ...

See also

The Queen Bee is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm, tale number 62. ... The Glass Coffin is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm, tale number 163. ... Box cover for Walt Disneys Sleeping Beauty Game. ...

References

Prince Florimund finds the Sleeping Beauty
Prince Florimund finds the Sleeping Beauty
  1. ^ Heidi Anne Heiner, "The Annotated Sleeping Beauty"
  2. ^ Giambattista Basile, Pentamerone, "Sun, Moon and Talia"
  3. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien, "On Fairy-Stories" , The Tolkien Reader, p 11-12
  4. ^ Maria Tatar, p 96, The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales, ISBN 0-393-05163-3
  5. ^ Jack Zipes, The Great Fairy Tale Tradition: From Straparola and Basile to the Brothers Grimm, p 648, ISBN 0-393-97636-X
  6. ^ Heidi Anne Heiner, "The Annotated Sleeping Beauty"
  7. ^ Heidi Anne Heiner, "Tales Similar to Sleeping Beauty"
  8. ^ Jacob and Wilheim Grimm, Grimms' Fairy Tales, "Little Briar-Rose"
  9. ^ Harry Velten, "The Influences of Charles Perrault's Contes de ma Mère L'oie on German Folklore", p 961, Jack Zipes, ed. The Great Fairy Tale Tradition: From Straparola and Basile to the Brothers Grimm, ISBN 0-393-97636-X
  10. ^ Harry Velten, "The Influences of Charles Perrault's Contes de ma Mère L'oie on German Folklore", p 962, Jack Zipes, ed. The Great Fairy Tale Tradition: From Straparola and Basile to the Brothers Grimm, ISBN 0-393-97636-X
  11. ^ Maria Tatar, The Annotated Brothers Grimm, p 376-7 W. W. Norton & company, London, New York, 2004 ISBN 0-393-05848-4
  12. ^ Italo Calvino, Italian Folktales p 485 ISBN 0-15-645489-0
  13. ^ Italo Calvino, Italian Folktales p 744 ISBN 0-15-645489-0
  14. ^ Heidi Anne Heiner, "Tales Similar to Sleeping Beauty"
  15. ^ Joseph Jacobs, More English Fairy Tales, "The King of England and his Three Sons"
  16. ^ Maria Tatar, The Annotated Brothers Grimm, p 230 W. W. Norton & company, London, New York, 2004 ISBN 0-393-05848-4
  17. ^ Max Lüthi, Once Upon A Time: On the Nature of Fairy Tales, p 33 Frederick Ungar Publishing Co., New York, 1970
  18. ^ Jack Zipes, When Dreams Came True: Classical Fairy Tales and Their Tradition, p 124-5 ISBN 0-415-92151-1
  19. ^ What Do You Say After You Say Hello?; 1975; ISBN 0-552-09806-X

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 418 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (615 × 882 pixel, file size: 112 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Prince Florimund finds the Sleeping Beauty From Childhoods Favorites and Fairy Stories, by Various Project Gutenberg etext 19993 http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 418 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (615 × 882 pixel, file size: 112 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Prince Florimund finds the Sleeping Beauty From Childhoods Favorites and Fairy Stories, by Various Project Gutenberg etext 19993 http://www. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... On Fairy-Stories is an essay by J. R. R. Tolkien which discusses the fairy-story as a literary form. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sleeping Beauty
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods
  • The Annotated Sleeping Beauty on the SurLaLune Fairy Tales site, including variants, history, modern interpretations, poetry and illustrations
  • Perrault's version discussed by Waller Hastings in "The sleeping beauty in the woods"
  • Perrault's version also discussed by Waller Hastings in "Sol, Luna, e Talia"
  • Free audio story of The Sleeping Beauty at Storynory
  • Audio of The Sleeping Beauty Part Two (The Queen Ogre) at Storynory
  • Sleeping Beauty by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm
  • Sleeping beauty in the woods, by Perrault, 1870 illustrated scanned book via Internet Archive
Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Internet Archive headquarters is in the Presidio, a former US military base in San Francisco. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sleeping Beauty (1959) (0 words)
Sleeping Beauty was never one of my favorite Disney movies, my parents having lost the tape really early.
Merryweather counteracts this by making Aurora go into a deep sleep were she ever to prick her finger, to be reawakened by true love's first kiss.
This is true for Sleeping Beauty (she has no control over the three basic actions in the movie).
SparkNotes: Sleeping Beauty: Context (1205 words)
Sleeping Beauty was Walt Disney Pictures’ sixteenth animated feature and, at the time, the most expensive of his films to produce.
Disney chose to adapt Tchaikovsky’s music for “The Sleeping Beauty” ballet, and in choosing to draw from such a grand composer for his seemingly simple family film, Disney declared the timelessness and artistic merits of Sleeping Beauty and brashly placed it in a canonical tradition.
Recently, Sleeping Beauty became the second film to receive a thorough computer restoration, in which a team of forty computer technicians pored over all 108,000 frames of the film to clean and refurbish the colors.
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