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Encyclopedia > Sleaford
Map sources for Sleaford at grid reference TF0645

Sleaford is a town in North Kesteven, Lincolnshire, England. It takes its name from the River Slea, a tributary of the River Witham. It is north-east of the town of Grantham and north-west of the town of Boston. Sleaford lies 115 miles north of the capital London, and the city of Lincoln is eighteen miles to the north. Image File history File links Dot4gb. ... Image File history File links Gb4dot. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Sleaford in Hampshire, England is a hamlet of Headley Civil Parish and the Kingsley Ecclesiastical Parish. ... North Kesteven is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England, part of the traditional area of Kesteven. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the east of England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... The River Slea is an 18-mile long tributary of the River Witham, in Lincolnshire, England. ... The River Witham is a river in the east of England. ... Grantham aka G-Town is a small market town in Lincolnshire, England with about 38,000 inhabitants. ... Statistics Population: 35,124 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TF329437 Administration District: Boston Borough Shire county: Lincolnshire Region: East Midlands Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Lincolnshire Historic county: Lincolnshire Services Police force: Lincolnshire Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: East Midlands Post office and telephone... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Shown within Lincolnshire Geography Status: City Region: East Midlands Admin. ...


Until recently Sleaford was primarily an agricultural town, supporting a cattle market and famous seed companies such as Hubbard and Phillips (whose name lives on the The Hub) and Sharpes International Seeds (whose history can be traced from their merger with Zeneca Seeds in 1996, which formed Advanta Seeds, right back to 1560 ). It is now also developing tourism and crafts, and is expanding rapidly. The town's current population is around 15,000. Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle (often called cows in vernacular and contemporary usage, or kye as the Scots plural of cou) are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... AstraZeneca PLC (LSE: AZN, NYSE: AZN), is a large Anglo-Swedish pharmaceutical company formed on 6 April 1999 by the merger of Swedish Astra AB and British Zeneca Group. ...

Contents

Historic buildings

Detail of St. Denys church entrance.
Detail of St. Denys church entrance.
St. Denys spire in context, adjacent to the 15th-century vicarage.
St. Denys spire in context, adjacent to the 15th-century vicarage.
Main entrance to The Hub, with new bridge over River Slea.
Main entrance to The Hub, with new bridge over River Slea.
Side of The Hub, with start of new riverside walk alongside River Slea.
Side of The Hub, with start of new riverside walk alongside River Slea.
Westholme House (1840s Gothic); administration office for Sleaford's Joint Sixth Form, at St. George's School.
Westholme House (1840s Gothic); administration office for Sleaford's Joint Sixth Form, at St. George's School.

The most prominent church in Sleaford is the parish church of St. Denys - the church abuts the market place, where markets are regularly held. The church has one of the oldest stone broach spires in England, and mostly dates from 1180, but parts of the church were rebuilt after an electrical storm in 1884. The altar rail (originally from Lincoln Cathedral) is by Sir Christopher Wren. The church is also known for its stained glass, elegant traceried windows, and carved heads. Image File history File links Detail of the front of the main church in Sleaford, England. ... Image File history File links Detail of the front of the main church in Sleaford, England. ... Image File history File links Seen from a distance: the main church in Sleaford, England. ... Image File history File links Seen from a distance: the main church in Sleaford, England. ... Image File history File links Entrance to The Hub at Sleaford, with bridge over the River Slea. ... Image File history File links Entrance to The Hub at Sleaford, with bridge over the River Slea. ... Image File history File links Part of The Hub at Sleaford, with the River Slea and riverside walk seen alongside it. ... Image File history File links Part of The Hub at Sleaford, with the River Slea and riverside walk seen alongside it. ... Image File history File links Part of St. ... Image File history File links Part of St. ... // Events and Trends Technology First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. War, peace and politics First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February... Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... A modern spire on the Lancaster University Chaplaincy Centre A spire is a tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, particularly a church tower. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, Netherlands A storm is any disturbed state of a planets atmosphere, especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Norman West front Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, or sometimes St. ... Christopher Wren. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... A gargoyle adorning Dornoch Cathedral in Scotland In architecture, the gargoyle (from the French gargouille, originally the throat or gullet, cf. ...


Cogglesford Water Mill (open to the public), on the banks of the River Slea, dates from the 17th century. It is Lincolnshire's last working water mill, and is of national importance in terms of the history of watermills, possibly being the last working Sherrif's Mill in England. It is probably on the site of an earlier Mercian estate mill. The house where the mill worker would have lived is now a restaurant. The River Slea is an 18-mile long tributary of the River Witham, in Lincolnshire, England. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Watermill of Braine-le-Château, Belgium (12th century) A watermill is a structure that uses a water wheel or turbine to drive a mechanical process such as flour or lumber production, or metal shaping (rolling, grinding or wire drawing). ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ...


Sleaford's Bull & Bog pub (formerly the Black Bull) is from 1689 according to a date-stone set in its front wall, and is said to have the oldest surviving pub sign in England. An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ...


There is a large 1796 windmill in the town centre, Money's Mill, although now without any sails. At the nearby village of Heckington there is a working eight-sail windmill. Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... It has been suggested that windpump be merged into this article or section. ...


Other town landmarks include the Handley Monument, the semi-derelict Bass Maltings, the ruins of the town's castle, and the Picturedrome (once a cinema (upstairs) and a pool hall (dowstairs), now a night club called Flicks). // Sleaford Castle, medieval castle in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England. ... Snooker is a cue sport that is played on a large (12 feet × 6 feet, 3. ...


Recent improvements

Since 2000 the town and its buildings have undergone significant expansion & improvement; with the building of numerous new private housing estates on the periphery, a new infant school, and refurbishment of town-centre buildings with a £15-million SRB 'Sleaford Pride' grant.


In 2005, a £55-million project was announced by Prince Charles and The Phoenix Trust, to restore The Bass Maltings complex on the southern side of the town. Sir Nikolaus Pevsner considered the huge brewing malthouses to be Lincolnshire's most important industrial architecture, stating in his Buildings of England book: "For sheer impressiveness, little in English architecture can equal the scale of this building. A massive four-storey square tower is in the centre of a line of eight detached pavilions. The total frontage is nearly 1,000 feet." Prince Charles may refer to: Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, current heir-apparent to the British throne Any of the previous British royals named Charles, Prince of Wales The former Belgian regent, Prince Charles of Belgium This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ...


In April 2005, the Channel 4 magazine Location, Location, Location named Sleaford as one of the Top 10 'house price hotspots' in England, forecasting a strong surge above Spring 2005 prices before the end of 2005. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Channel Four Television Corporation. ... Location, Location, Location is a Channel 4 property programme, presented by Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer. ...


The Sleaford Town Stadium is also hoping to get up and running sometime soon. They have had lots of donations to get it going. At the moment they play in RAF Cranwell


Attractions

In October 2003 the largest public-funded crafts & design gallery outside London, The Hub, opened in Sleaford. The development cost £2.4 million, offering 2000 sq.ft. of display space within a former seed warehouse. Entrance to The Hub is free. It incorporates 'The Pearoom', a major crafts gallery previously in nearby Heckington village. In the nearby courtyard are designer-maker craft studios. There is also a new riverside walk with sculptures, starting from the Hub. The village of Heckington is located about midway between Sleaford and Boston in Lincolnshire. ...


There is a large street market, of around thirty stalls, in the market square abutted by St. Deny's church. Market days are on Friday, Saturday & Monday (Monday being the busiest). There is a farmers' market on the first Saturday in each month. In 2003 Daily Telegraph readers voted Sleaford the 7th best market town in England. Roadside farmers market in Bridgehampton, New York Dutch bell peppers at a farmers market in Montpelier, Vermont A farmers market near the Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ...


Maypole dancing happens in the market square on the first May bank holiday Monday. The Kesteven Morris dance team rehearses, and occasionally performs, in Sleaford. Dancing around the maypole, in Ã…mmeberg, Sweden The maypole is a tall wooden pole (traditionally of hawthorn or birch), sometimes erected with several long coloured ribbons suspended from the top, festooned with flowers, draped in greenery and strapped with large circular wreaths, depending on local and regional variances. ... A Bank Holiday is a public holiday in the United Kingdom and also in the Republic of Ireland. ... A Morris dance is a form of folk dance. ...


Sleaford Wood is a Woodland Trust wood, on the northern edge of town. It is a mature 250-year old wood, with deer and woodpeckers. The woodland trust logo The Woodland Trust, established in 1972 in Grantham, Lincolnshire, is a conservation charity in the United Kingdom concerned with the protection and sympathetic management of native woodland heritage. ... Fawn redirects here. ... Genera Melanerpes Sphyrapicus Xiphidiopicus Dendropicos Dendrocopos Picoides Veniliornis Campethera Geocolaptes Dinopium Meiglyptes Hemicircus Micropternus Picus Mulleripicus Dryocopus Celeus Piculus Colaptes Campephilus Chrysocolaptes Reinwardtipicus Blythipicus Gecinulus Sapheopipo For other uses, see Woodpecker (disambiguation). ...


Sleaford Golf Club is an 18-hole course.


Approximately three miles from Sleaford are the two famous RAF Cranwell airfields. The national RAF officer training college is centred between these. The northern airfield (grassed) includes the area used by early naval airships. The larger southern airfield has supported military jet operations since the first flight of the Gloster Whittle. It currently has two paved runways. Training craft such as the Firefly, Tucano and Super King Air complement the operations at Cranwell. An independent Heritage Centre at North Rauceby near Sleaford, supported by the local Council, interprets the aviation exploits associated with the RAF airfields around Sleaford. A satellite airfield nearby, at Barkston Heath, teaches flying skills to future military aircrew. RAF Cranwell is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire close to the village of Cranwell, near Sleaford. ... RAF redirects here. ... USS Akron (ZRS-4) in flight, November 2, 1931 An airship or dirigible is a buoyant aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... Jet aircraft with condensation trail Jet aircraft are aircraft with jet engines. ... The Gloster E.28/39, (also referred to as the Gloster Whittle, Gloster Pioneer, or Gloster G.40) was the first jet engined aircraft to fly in the United Kingdom. ...


About ten miles away is RAF Coningsby, home of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight and the first operational Typhoon squadron in the RAF. A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Swedish/Norwegian mil. ... RAF Coningsby, is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire, England. ... The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight is a Royal Air Force flight which provides an aerial display group comprising an Avro Lancaster, a Supermarine Spitfire and a Hawker Hurricane. ... The Eurofighter Typhoon is a twin-engine multi-role canard-delta strike fighter aircraft, designed and built by a consortium of European aerospace manufacturers through Eurofighter GmbH which was formed in 1986. ...


7 miles south along the roman road of Mareham Lane is the famous village of Threekingham. Named after the famous legend where a battle was fought by three kings each of which died in that very battle. it is also famous for the gate of a large manor. The gate is made from the Ribs of (as legend has it) the world's largest Goldfish. Trinomial name Carassius auratus (Linnaeus, 1758) For the baked snack crackers, please see Goldfish (snack). ...


Education

The primary and junior schools in Sleaford are The Quarrington School, and the William Alvey which has a newly built infants block, St. Botolph's (CofE) Primary School and Church Lane Primary School. Secondary Schools for older pupils are Carre's Grammar School (male selective secondary school), the Kesteven and Sleaford High School (female selective secondary school), and St. George's College of Technology (mixed secondary school). These three schools feed a unique joint sixth-form consortium (pictured below). There are also the nurseries. They are Redcroft Day Nursery, Woodside Children's Nursey, Happy Day Nursery and Sleaford Day Nursery. Carres Grammar School is an all-male selective state secondary school on Northgate in Sleaford in Lincolnshire. ... Grammar school can refer to various types of schools in different English-speaking countries. ... Kesteven and Sleaford High School is an all-female selective state secondary school for ages 11-18, on Jermyn Street in Sleaford in Lincolnshire, close to Sleaford train station. ... Grammar school can refer to various types of schools in different English-speaking countries. ... A Comprehensive school is a type of school providing secondary level education in England or Wales. ... England, Wales, Northern Ireland The sixth form, in the English, Welsh and Northern Irish education systems, is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level...


Media

Local newspapers are The Sleaford Citizen, The Sleaford Standard, and The Sleaford Target. Local radio is provided by BBC Radio Lincolnshire and the commercial radio station Lincs FM. BBC Radio Lincolnshire is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Lincolnshire—apart from the northern parts of the county, which are covered by BBC Radio Humberside. ... Lincs FM Broadcasts from studios at Witham Park in Lincoln. ...


Travel

The three-platform railway station provides a junction served by local trains using the Peterborough-Doncaster Joint Line, and the busier Stoke-on-Trent-Nottingham-Skegness line. The City of Peterborough is a cathedral city and Unitary Authority in the East of England. ... Doncaster is a town in the English county of South Yorkshire, and the principal settlement of the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire. ... This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... Skegness is a seaside resort town in Lincolnshire, England, with a permanent population of about 30,000. ...


Grantham station - and its express East Coast Main Line rail link to London - is twenty minutes away from Sleaford by road, or around twenty-five minutes by rail. Travel by train to London King's Cross from Sleaford usually takes just under two hours (including connections). Grantham aka G-Town is a small market town in Lincolnshire, England with about 38,000 inhabitants. ... The East Coast Main Line viaduct at Durham. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Kings Cross station (often spelt Kings Cross on platform signs) is a railway station in the district of the same name in northeast central London. ...


The town is situated south of the intersection of the A17 and A15 roads at the Holdingham roundabout. The town was bypassed by the busy A17 on 27th March 1975 (opened by Joe Godber, the local MP). The section from the Holdingham roundabout to the A153 Anwick road had been opened earlier on 14th November 1973 by Dennis Monk, the chief engineer of the project. It was bypassed by the less busy A15 on 16th September 1993 (opened by Douglas Hogg MP). The A17 road is a road linking Newark-on-Trent in Nottinghamshire, England, to Kings Lynn in Norfolk. ... The A15 is a major road in England. ... The Right Honourable Douglas Martin Hogg, 3rd Viscount Hailsham, PC, QC (born February 2, 1945), is a British politician and barrister. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...


There are plans to make the River Slea navigable again by boats, from the River Witham up to Sleaford. It is currently navigable only by canoes and similar lightweight one-person craft. Most of the Slea has footpaths running alongside it, and these complement the area's many public footpaths and cycle-paths. A wood-and-canvas canoe evokes the heritage of canoeing in North America A canoe is a small narrow boat, typically human-powered, but also commonly sailed. ... Footpath in England In England and Wales, a footpath is path on which the public have a legally-protected right-of-way on foot. ...


There are several new cycle-paths around the town, including the Sleaford Cycle Trail, but Sleaford is not yet connected to the National Cycle Network. There are plans to connect the town with the existing NCN National Route 15 which currently (July 05) ends just north of Grantham - the 15 will be extended through Sleaford to meet the NCN National Route 1 at the River Witham. The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ...


History

A rare Bronze Age torc was found nearby at Sudbrook, in the early 1990s. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... A torc, also spelled torq or torque (from Latin torqueo, to twist, because of the twisted shape of the collar) is a rigid circular necklace that is open-ended at the front. ...


The modern centre of Sleaford originated as New Sleaford. Excavations in the market place in 1979 uncovered the remains of a small Anglo-Saxon settlement of eighth century date. Old Sleaford, towards the eastern end of the modern town, was probably a tribal centre of the Iron Age Corieltauvi. There may have been a pre-Roman coin mint here, since the largest hoard of coin pellet moulds ever found in Europe was excavated here. Few Iron Age coins were found here however, and it is believed that after being poured into the pellet moulds, the coins were taken to Leicester to be stamped. Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... The Coritani, or Corieltauvi, were one of the Celtic tribes living in the British Islands, previous to the Roman invasion of Britain. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Leicester (pronounced ) is the largest city in the East Midlands of England. ...


A Roman road, Mareham Lane, used to run through Old Sleaford, and southwards along the fen edge, towards Bourne. Where it passed through Old Sleaford, excavations have revealed a large stone-built domestic residence with associated farm buildings, corn-driers, ovens and field systems, as well as a number of burials. A Roman road in Pompeii Road Construction on Trajans Column The Roman roads were essential for the growth of their empire, by enabling them to move armies. ... Location within the British Isles Bourne is a town in southern Lincolnshire, England. ...


In 1858, just to the south of the town, a large Anglo-Roman cemetery was found, showing a mix of pagan and Christian burial practices. A large Anglo-Saxon cemetery, of some 600 burials was found during construction of the new railway station in 1882. Further to the south-west, in nearby Quarrington, a substantial Anglo-Saxon settlement was excavated during a new housing development. To the north of the town, a small early Saxon settlement was investigated prior to the construction of the new McDonald's restaurant at Holdingham roundabout. 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Graves at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ... Heathen redirects here. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ...


Under the Anglo-Saxons, until conquered by the Vikings, Sleaford became part of the Flaxwell Wapentake. Sleaford ('Eslaforde') was then held by a man named Bardi. The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... A wapentake is a term derived from the Old Norse, the rough equivalent of an Anglo-Saxon hundred. ...


William the Conqueror gave the manor of 'Eslaforde' to Remigius de Fécamp, the first Bishop of Lincoln, in around 1086. William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Remigius de Fécamp, bishop of Dorchester 1070-1072, who then became the first bishop of Lincoln when in 1072 he and the king moved the seat of that bishopric to Lincoln, reconstituting it as the diocese of Lincoln. ... Arms of the Bishop of Lincoln The Bishop of Lincoln heads the Anglican Diocese of Lincoln in the Province of Canterbury. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ...


About 1130, Bishop Alexander built a castle just southwest of the town. The footings and moat can still be seen, in what is now the Castle Fields. This was the period in which the town moved westwards. The castle was demolished in the Elizabethan era, not later than 1600. Events February 13 - Innocent II is elected pope An antipope schism occurs when Roger II of Sicily supports Anacletus II as pope instead of Innocent II. Innocent flees to France and Anacletus crowns Roger King. ... Balmoral Castle, Scotland Castle has a history of scholarly debate surrounding its exact meaning. ... The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


King John who was disliked by the baronage visited Sleaford in 1216, the day after he had lost his baggage train. He was already ill but someone spread the story that while staying overnight at Swineshead Abbey, he was poisoned by a monk with toad venom. The king reached Newark and died. Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ... Events Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... Swineshead is one of eighteen parishes which, together with Boston, form the Borough of Boston in the county of Lincolnshire, England. ... Families At least 9, see article. ... Newark (also Newark-on-Trent) is a market town in Nottinghamshire (in 1216 it was in Lincolnshire) in the East Midlands area of England, located on the River Trent, the River Devon also runs through the town. ...


From 1556 the ownership of the town and its lands passed from the church to local absentee landowners. Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ...


Carre's Grammar School was established in 1604. Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ...


The common lands were enclosed in 1777. Year 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The Sleaford Navigation was opened in 1794. The River Slea is an 18-mile long tributary of the River Witham, in Lincolnshire, England. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


From 1829 to 1831 the street pattern of the entire town was reworked, a new Town Hall built, and better drainage laid. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The railways arrived from 1857. Sleaford was eventually the junction of six major roads and five railway branch-lines, making it a regional centre. The railways caused the decline of the Sleaford Navigation, which closed in 1878. It had much to be proud of when this description was penned in 1870 http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/descriptions/entry_page.jsp?text_id=931780&word=NULL 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The Hubbard seed firm began in Sleaford in 1882 and then grew to become a major national business. Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ...


With the establishment of the Kesteven County Council under the Act of Parliament of 1888, Sleaford became its county town. Parts of Kesteven is a traditional subdivision of Lincolnshire, England. ... In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ...


The Bass Maltings complex opened fully in 1905, replacing all the small malthouses in the area. The complex struggled to remain open during World War II, but survived until 1960 when it closed. 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ...


During World War I, from 1916 naval airships operated from nearby Cranwell, then known as Daedalus, and a now defunct field, RFC Leadenham provided England's main defence against Zeppelin raids. Cranwell became the world's first military air academy in 1920. Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Cranwell (The name means the spring where the cranes are found) is a village with a population of approximately 3,000 inhabitants (part of the Civil Parish of Cranwell and Byards Leap), situated in the North Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England, on the B1429 road approximately 7km north-west... The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I. Origin and Early History Formed by Royal Warrant on May 13, 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers. ... LZ127 Graf Zeppelin, one of the two zeppelins that carried passengers from Germany to the United States. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


During World War II the many RAF airfields north of Sleaford played a role in the Battle of Britain, in the debilitating of the Axis war machine and RAF and USAAF airfields all around took part in the Allied invasion of Europe. (For example, see RAF Folkingham). Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... RAF redirects here. ... Combatants United Kingdom Including combatants from United States of America Australia Canada Czechoslovakia Ireland Palestine Poland Germany Including combatants from Italy Commanders Hugh Dowding Hermann Göring Albert Kesselring Strength initially 700 aircraft; grew to nearly 1,000 by the end of the Battle. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was a part of the U.S. Army during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... Location within the British Isles RAF Folkingham at British national grid reference SK0530, an air station of the Second World War period, was established in phases on a convex hilltop, by the British Royal Air Force and was lent to the United States Army Air Forces. ...


In the 1940s plastic surgery was pioneered at No.4 RAF Hospital, Rauceby, on the western outskirts of Sleaford. The Burns Unit was situated in Orchard House - one of the last remaining parts of Rauceby Hospital (formerly the Kesteven Lunatic Asylum) to remain in NHS use as offices for Lincolnshire South West tPCT following the Mental Health Hospital's closure in 1998. The whole site (which is now being redeveloped principally by David Wilson Homes for private housing) and its immediate environs including Rauceby railway station, has recently been renamed as Greylees, a suburb of the Market Town of Sleaford. The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... Plastic surgery is a specialty that uses surgical techniques to change the appearance and function of patients bodies. ... Rauceby railway station can be found near the Town of Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England, lying close to the western border of the Parish of Old Sleaford and Quarrington just over half-a-mile south of the village of South Rauceby. ...


Famous people

// Hereward the Wake, known in his own times as Hereward the Outlaw or Hereward the Exile, was an 11th century leader in England who led resistance to the Norman Conquest, and was consequently labelled an outlaw. ... Location within the British Isles Bourne is a town in southern Lincolnshire, England. ... Joseph Banks Sir Joseph Banks (February 13, 1743 - June 19, 1820) was the British naturalist and botanist on Cooks first great voyage (1768-1771) and some 75 species bear Banks name. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The River Witham is a river in the east of England. ... George Bass George Bass, British naval surgeon and explorer of Australia (1771 – unknown, post 1803), was born at Aswarby, a hamlet near Sleaford Lincolnshire and was educated at Boston Grammar School. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Capital Hobart Government Const. ... Bass Strait (IPA /bæs/) is a sea strait separating Tasmania from the south of the Australian mainland (Victoria in particular). ... Cecil Rhodes. ... Eric Thompson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Le Manège Enchanté (known in English as The Magic Roundabout) was a childrens television programme created in France in 1963 by Serge Danot. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE FRS (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was a Royal Air Force officer who invented the jet engine. ... Dorrington is a village in Shropshire, England. ... Cranwell (The name means the spring where the cranes are found) is a village with a population of approximately 3,000 inhabitants (part of the Civil Parish of Cranwell and Byards Leap), situated in the North Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England, on the B1429 road approximately 7km north-west... The Gloster E.28/39, (also referred to as the Gloster Whittle, Gloster Pioneer, or Gloster G.40) was the first jet engined aircraft to fly in the United Kingdom. ... Bernie Taupin (born May 22, 1950) is an English lyricist famous for his collaboration with Elton John. ... Sir Elton Hercules John, CBE[1][2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is an English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Jennifer Saunders Jennifer Jane Saunders (born July 6, 1958 in Sleaford, Lincolnshire) is an English comedian, actress, and comedy writer. ... Absolutely Fabulous was a British sitcom written by and starring Jennifer Saunders, and co-starring Joanna Lumley and Julia Sawalha. ... Abigail Titmuss (born 1976 in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England) is a TV presenter and model with a lascivious image based on her role in a ménage à trois celebrity sex tape, hosting a programme on a pornographic TV channel, and authoring an erotic novel. ... An A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education usually taken during Further Education and after GCSEs. ...

External links

  • Cogglesford Mill, East Road, Sleaford
  • Sleaford Museum Trust
  • The Hub Centre for Craft Design & Making
  • Sleaford Navigation Trust
  • Sleaford New Life Church
  • St. Deny's Church
  • Sleaford Little Theatre
  • Sleaford Golf Club
  • Sleaford Town Council


Lincolnshire

Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the east of England. ... Image File history File links Lincolnshire_flag. ...


County town: Lincoln Shown within Lincolnshire Geography Status: City Region: East Midlands Admin. ...


Other settlements: Boston | Bourne | The Deepings | Gainsborough | Grantham | Louth | Skegness | Sleaford | Spalding | Stamford Statistics Population: 35,124 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TF329437 Administration District: Boston Borough Shire county: Lincolnshire Region: East Midlands Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Lincolnshire Historic county: Lincolnshire Services Police force: Lincolnshire Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: East Midlands Post office and telephone... Location within the British Isles Bourne is a town in southern Lincolnshire, England. ... Map sources for The Deepings at grid reference TF150094 The Deepings is a collective term used to describe adjoining villages near the River Welland, 8 miles to the North of Peterborough and 10 miles or so to the East of Stamford. ... Statistics Population: 19,110 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SK815901 Administration District: West Lindsey Shire county: Lincolnshire Region: East Midlands Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Lincolnshire Historic county: Lincolnshire Services Police force: Lincolnshire Police Ambulance service: East Midlands Post office and telephone Post town: GAINSBOROUGH... Grantham aka G-Town is a small market town in Lincolnshire, England with about 38,000 inhabitants. ... Statistics Population: 15,000 1 2 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TF326874 Administration District: East Lindsey Shire county: Lincolnshire Region: East Midlands Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Lincolnshire Historic county: Lincolnshire Services Police force: Lincolnshire Police Ambulance service: East Midlands Post office and telephone Post... Skegness is a seaside resort town in Lincolnshire, England, with a permanent population of about 30,000. ... Spalding is a market town in Lincolnshire, England, perhaps best known for its annual Flower Parade. ... Stamford is a town on the River Welland in Lincolnshire, England. ...


Parliamentary Constituencies: Boston and Skegness | Gainsborough | Grantham and Stamford | Lincoln | Louth and Horncastle | Sleaford and North Hykeham | South Holland and The Deepings Boston and Skegness is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Gainsborough is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Grantham and Stamford is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Lincoln is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Louth and Horncastle is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Sleaford and North Hykeham is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... South Holland and The Deepings is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Districts: Boston | East Lindsey | Lincoln | North Kesteven | South Holland | South Kesteven | West Lindsey Boston is a local government district with borough status in Lincolnshire, England. ... East Lindsey is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England. ... Shown within Lincolnshire Geography Status: City Region: East Midlands Admin. ... North Kesteven is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England, part of the traditional area of Kesteven. ... South Holland is a local government district of Lincolnshire. ... South Kesteven is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England, forming part of the traditional Kesteven division of the county . ... West Lindsey is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England. ...


Further details: Geography | History | Education | Transport | Places of interest | Diocese Lincolnshire, England derived from the merging of the territory of the ancient Kingdom of Lindsey with that controlled by the Danelaw borough Stamford. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the east of England. ... The Diocese of Lincoln forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. ...


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  Results from FactBites:
 
England GenWeb Project - Lincolnshire, Sleaford Workhouse (359 words)
After the Poor Law Reform Act of 1834, the Sleaford Poor Law Union was formed on 20th September 1836 to serve the needs of 56 local parishes, all within the county of Lincoln and covering about 131,780 acres of land.
The Sleaford Poor Law Union was divided into five subdistricts: Billinghay, Heckington, Sleaford, Leadenham and Aswarby.
In 1891, the workhouse held 91 officers and inmates.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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