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Encyclopedia > Slavey language

The Slavey language is a spoken language used among the Slavey Native American people of Canada.


In older literature, the name of the language was spelt Slave; however, the connotations of this, along with the pronunciation of the homograph slave (the final e should be pronounced) have caused the change to Slavey instead.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Slavey language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (368 words)
In older literature, the name of the language was spelt Slave; however, the connotations of this, along with the pronunciation of the homograph slave (the final e should be pronounced) have caused the change to Slavey instead.
Slavey was the native language spoken by the fictional band in the Canadian television series, North of 60.
North Slavey language is spoken in the Mackenzie District along the middle Mackenzie River from Fort Norman north, around Great Bear Lake, and in the Mackenzie Mountains of the Canadian territory of Northwest Territories.
Language family - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (775 words)
A language family is a group of genetically related languages said to have descended from a common proto-language.
The concept of linguistic ancestry is less clear-cut than the concept of biological ancestry, as in cases of extreme historical language contact, in particular the formation of creole languages and other types of mixed languages; it may be unclear which language should be considered the ancestor of a given language.
Language families can be divided into smaller phylogenetic units, conventionally referred to as branches of the family, because the history of a language family is often represented as a tree diagram.
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