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Encyclopedia > Slavey

The Slavey (comprised of two groups, North and South Slavey) are a native American group indigenous to the Great Slave Lake region, in Canada's Northwest Territories. They are considered to be a part of the Athabaskan or Na-Dené language group and can be written using Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics or the Roman alphabet.


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North Slavey language - encyclopedia article about North Slavey language. (1725 words)
The Slavey (also Slave) (pronounced: /slevi/) is an Athabaskan language Athabaskan or Athabascan (also Athapascan or Athapaskan) is the name of a large group of distantly related Native American peoples, also known as the Athabasca Indians or Athapaskes, located in two main Southern and Northern groups in western North America, and of their language family.
Slavey was the native language spoken by the fictional band in the Canadian television series, North of 60 North of 60 was a mid-1990s Canadian television series depicting life in the Arctic (north of 60 degrees North latitude, hence the title).
North Slavey language is spoken in the Mackenzie District MacKenzie District is a political district on New Zealand's South Island.
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