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Encyclopedia > Slave ship

Slave ships were cargo boats specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves, especially newly captured African slaves. The most important routes of the slave ships led from the northern and middle coasts of Africa to South America and the south coast of what is today the Caribbean and the United States of America. The captains and sailors of the boats were allowed to do whatever they wanted with the slaves. This included rape, murder, and torture because the slaves were considered their property. Over 30,000 voyages were made from America to Africa to capture slaves.[citation needed] The transportation of slaves from Africa to America was known as the Middle Passage. The African slave trade was outlawed in 1807, by a law passed jointly in the United States of America and the United Kingdom. After 1807 all slave ships leaving Africa were legally pirate vessels subject to capture by the American and British navies. During this time, the slave ships became smaller and more cramped in exchange for improved performance in their new role as smuggling craft and blockade runners. Download high resolution version (776x900, 182 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A boat is a watercraft designed to float on, and provide transport over, water. ... Slave redirects here. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... West Indian redirects here. ... The Middle Passage Atlantic slave trade was the forced transportation of African people from Africa to enslavement in North America, South America and the Caribbean (The Americas). ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Atlantic slave trade

Only a few decades after the discovery of America by Europeans, the native population was so decimated that it was a profitable business to send slave ships into the Atlantic to perform labor intensive agricultural work.[citation needed] The peak time of slave ships to the Atlantic passage was between the 17th and 18th century when large plantations developed in the English colonies of North America. Olmec script These glyphs written in Epi-Olmec script, the earliest examples of writing in the Americas, give a calendar date of 7. ... The Atlantic slave trade, first begun with the Portuguese[1], was the selling of African slaves by Europeans that occurred in and around the Atlantic Ocean. ...


In order to achieve high profits from the transports, the owners of the ships divided the hull into between decks, so they could transport as many slaves as possible. This led to highly unhygienic conditions, and consequently an enormously high mortality rate. Only the most resilient survived the transport. Often the ships transported hundreds of slaves, who were chained tightly to plank beds. For example, the slave ship "Henrietta Marie" carried up to 400 slaves on a single passage, who were confined to two decks, and each slave spent the week long passage chained to the bow of the ship.[citation needed] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ... Crude death rate by country Mortality rate is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in some population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit time. ...

Brookes slave ship plan

Slave ship poster, from http://www. ... Slave ship poster, from http://www. ...

List of slave ships

Note: While La Amistad is often called a slave ship, it was in fact a general purpose cargo ship, which occasionally carried slaves. See the article about the ship, and the resulting court case, for more information.   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ... The USS Constellation constructed in 1854 is a sloop-of-war and the second United States Navy ship to carry this famous name. ... Fredensborg was a frigate built in Copenhagen in 1752 or 1753. ... Tromøy is an island outside the Norwegian town Arendal. ... An example of three way trade in the North Atlantic Triangular trade is a historical term denoting trade between three ports or regions. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... Map of Key West Key West is a city located in Monroe County, Florida. ... The Tecora was an infamous Portuguese slave ship of the early 1800s. ... La Amistad (Spanish: Friendship) was a 19th-century two-masted schooner of about 120 tons displacement. ... The USS Constellation constructed in 1854 is a sloop-of-war and the second United States Navy ship to carry this famous name. ... The Turks and Caicos Islands is an overseas territory of the United Kingdom consisting of two groups of tropical islands in the Caribbean, southeast of the Bahamas, at 21°45N, 71°35W. The thirty islands total 166 sq. ... The Wanderer was the last ship to bring slaves from Africa to the United States. ... A barc is a type of sailing vessel. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... The Zong Massacre was an infamous mass-killing of African slaves that took place on the Zong, a British ship owned by James Gregson and colleagues in a Liverpool slave-ship firm. ... Image File history File links NavioNegreiro. ... La Amistad (Spanish: Friendship) was a 19th-century two-masted schooner of about 120 tons displacement. ... (Spanish: friendship) was a Spanish merchant ship on which a rebellion by the African slaves it was carrying broke out in 1839 when the schooner was traveling along the coast of Cuba. ...


See also

This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Slave Coast is the name of the coastal areas of present Togo, Benin (formerly Dahomey) and western Nigeria, a fertile region of coastal Western Africa along the Bight of Benin. ... ÃŽle de Gorée (i. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Slave Ship Trouvadore Website
  2. ^ Harper's Weekly, June 2, 1860, p344. Online at The Slave Heritage Resource Center accessed 3 July 2006.

External links

  • High resolution photos of a model of the French slave ship L' Aurore
  • List of slaveships
  • Unesco maps: The Slave Route (PDF)
  • Scotland and the Abolition of the Slave Trade - schools resource
  • Yet another article about slave ships - hundreds of German slave ships are listed in the article (PDF in German)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Slave ship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (465 words)
Slave ships were cargo boats specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves, especially newly captured African slaves.
The most important routes of the slave ships led from the northern and middle coasts of Africa to South America and the south coast of what is today the Caribbean and the United States of America.
The peak time of slave ships to the Atlantic passage was between the 17th and 18th century when large plantations developed in the English colonies of North America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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