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Encyclopedia > Slate (magazine)
Slate
URL http://slate.com/
Commercial? Yes
Type of site Online Magazine
Registration Optional for The Fray
Owner The Washington Post Company
Created by Microsoft Corporation

Slate is an online news and culture magazine created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and owned by Microsoft (as part of MSN). On December 21, 2004, it was purchased by the Washington Post Company. Former political correspondent Jacob Weisberg is the current editor and the Washington Post Company's Cliff Sloan is Slate's publisher.[1] Slate is updated every day, and covers politics, arts and culture, sports, and news. It is ad-supported, and has been entirely free since 1999. Image File history File links Slate_logo. ... Image File history File links Slate_screenshot. ... Uniform Resource Locator (URL) is a technical, Web-related term used in two distinct meanings: in popular usage, it is a widespread synonym for Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)—many popular and technical texts will use the term URL when referring to URI; in strict technical usage, it is a subset... The Fray is the collective name for online magazine pioneer Slate. ... The Washington Post Company is an American media company, best known for owning the newspaper it is named after, The Washington Post, and Newsweek magazine. ... Microsoft is one of few companies engaging itself in the console wars Where they are up against sony, nintendo, and of course sharps new console which may cause a threat. ... For other uses, see the disambiguation section. ... Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... Microsoft is one of few companies engaging itself in the console wars Where they are up against sony, nintendo, and of course sharps new console which may cause a threat. ... For other uses, see MSN (disambiguation). ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post Company (NYSE: WPO) is an American media company, best known for owning the newspaper it is named after, The Washington Post, and Newsweek magazine. ... Jacob Weisberg (born 1964) is an American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as editor of Slate magazine. ... Cliff Sloan is the publisher of Slate magazine. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Billboards and street advertising in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, (2005) Advertising is paid communication through a non-personal medium in which the sponsor is identified and the message is controlled. ...

Contents

Background

Slate features regular and semi-regular columns such as Explainer, Chatterbox, and Dear Prudence. Many of the articles tend to be short and relatively lighthearted pieces. There are also many meta-columns: collection and analysis of major newspapers, magazines, blogs, and the like. It has a number of associated blogs, including some of the most notable on the Internet, such as the Kausfiles. It also features frequent week-long diary series from interesting people and a link to each day's Doonesbury, whose website Slate hosts. Slate also features podcasts of several of its columns available for daily download. Dear Prudence is an advice column appearing weekly in the online magazine Slate and syndicated to over 200 newspapers. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Kausfiles is a mostly political blog featured on Slate. ... Doonesbury was featured on the cover of the Feb. ...


Slate contributes to the National Public Radio show Day to Day. Offical NPR logo National Public Radio (NPR) is an independent, private, non-profit membership organization of public radio stations in the United States. ... Day to Day is a one-hour weekday American radio newsmagazine distributed by National Public Radio (NPR), and produced by NPR in collaboration with Slate. ...


Commentator Mickey Kaus's column "Kausfiles" is seen as one of the earliest blogs. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Slate features a set of online forum boards called "The Fray", the editing and moderator duties of which are left up to a "Fray Editor." The Fray is the collective name for online magazine pioneer Slate. ...


In March 1998, Slate attracted considerable notice by charging a $19.95 annual subscription fee, becoming one of the first non-pornographic sites to attempt a subscription-based business model. The scheme didn't work; less than a year later, in February 1999, Slate dropped the charge and returned to free content, citing both sluggish subscription sales and increased advertising revenue. A similar subscription model would later be implemented by Slate's independently-owned competitor Salon.com, beginning in April 2001. Salon.com is still primarily subscription-based as of 2007, unlike Slate. Screenshot of Salon. ...


On July 15, 2005, Slate began offering a podcast, featuring selected stories from the site read by Slate editor Andy Bowers. Another podcast, featuring the Explainer column, was later added, read by Slate foreign editor June Thomas. A third, called Slate's Spoiler Special, reviews movies for people who have already seen them. July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An orange square with waves was introduced by Mozilla Firefox to indicate that an RSS feed is present on a webpage. ...


In September 2005, Michael Kinsley returned to Slate, writing a weekly column to be published simultaneously in Slate and the Washington Post. Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... ...


On November 30, 2005, Slate started their daily feature ”Today's Pictures,” featuring fifteen to twenty photographs from the archive at Magnum Photos that share a common theme. The column also features two flash animated ”Interactive Essays” a month. November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Magnum Photos is a world-renowned photographic agency, with offices located in New York, Paris, London and Tokyo. ...


In June 2006, on its 10th anniversary, Slate unveiled a redesigned website.


Editorial stance

Slate's focus and editorial slant is politically liberal, as seen in choice of columnists, choice of and position on topics, and featured cartoon: Doonesbury. During the 2004 U.S. presidential campaign, a significant majority of staff and contributors supported Democratic challenger John Kerry. Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Doonesbury was featured on the cover of the Feb. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ...


A more fine-grained analysis puts Slate slightly to the left of The New Republic, but still to the right of Salon.com or The Nation. It includes many voices of the Clintonian / Democratic Leadership Council / neoliberal point of view. These include two of its bloggers: Mickey Kaus, whose favorite subjects include welfare reform and the potential for a future candidate from either party to reap major political gains by taking a law-and-order stance on immigration issues; and Bruce Reed, who was President Clinton's domestic policy adviser, and is current president of the Democratic Leadership Council. Jack Shafer, one of its top editors, has stated that he has voted for the Libertarian Party candidate for President in every election since he became eligible to vote. (One unusual feature of the magazine is that it explicitly states its staff's biases, going so far as to publish the presidential votes of individual staff members and writers.) Slate frequently publishes columns that advocate a neoclassical view of economics, for example articles by professors Paul Krugman, Steven Landsburg, and Tim Harford, who although perhaps classifiable as liberal, are still part of the economic establishment and have each done significant research work. For other uses, see the disambiguation section. ... Screenshot of Salon. ... This article is about the U.S publication. ... A Clintonian is member of the faction of the United States Democratic Party centered around former President Bill Clinton and his wife current New York Senator Hillary Clinton. ... The Democratic Leadership Council is a non-profit corporation[1] that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from traditionally populist positions. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mickey Kaus is a journalist and author best known form writing Kausfiles, a mostly political blog featured on Slate. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Democratic Leadership Council is a non-profit corporation[1] that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from traditionally populist positions. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded in 1971. ... Paul Krugman Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an economist at Princeton University who has written several books and since 2000 has written a twice-weekly op-ed column for The New York Times. ... Steven Landsburg Steven Landsburg is a libertarian American and professor of economics at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York. ... Tim Harford (born 1973) is an English journalist. ...


On the occupation of Iraq, Slate has taken a "liberal hawk" perspective. This viewpoint is embodied in the frequent contributions of Christopher Hitchens, William Saletan, Michael Kinsley and others. Timothy Noah is the only Slate staffer who initially opposed the U.S. invasion, and even he was persuaded to abandon his relatively dovish position by Colin Powell, as he documented in Chatterbox Goes to War. Since the war began, however, the magazine has been increasingly critical of the war's handling, most strongly in Fred Kaplan's "War Stories" column. Christopher Eric Hitchens (born in Portsmouth, England April 13, 1949) is an author, journalist and literary critic. ... William Saletan is the chief national correspondent at Slate. ... Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... Timothy Noah is the Chatterbox columnist for Slate Magazine and a contributing editor to The Washington Monthly. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Fred Kaplan is a journalist and contributor to Slate magazine. ...


Contributors/Departments

  • Eric Liu ('Teachings')
  • Stephen Metcalf ('The Dilettante')
  • Timothy Noah ('Chatterbox'/'Hot Document')
  • Josh Patner ('Fashion')
  • Troy Patterson ('Television')
  • Robert Pinsky ('Poetry editor')
  • David Plotz ('Blogging the Bible')
  • Daniel Politi ('Today's Papers')
  • Bruce Reed ('The Has-Been')
  • Jody Rosen ('Music Box')
  • William Saletan ('Human Nature'/'The Frame Game')
  • Jack Shafer ('Press Box')
  • Dana Stevens ('Surfergirl' through 2005/'Movies')
  • Garry Trudeau ('Doonesbury')
  • Seth Stevenson ('Ad Report Card'/'Well-Traveled')
  • Eric Umansky ('Today's Papers')
  • Jacob Weisberg ('Bushisms'/'The Big Idea')
  • Emily Yoffe ('Dear Prudence'/'Human Guinea-pig')

Henry Blodget (born 1967) is a former securities analyst, first famous and later made infamous for his optimistic outlook of dot-com stocks during his tenure as senior Internet analyst for Merrill Lynch in the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... Paul Boutin (born 1961 in Lewiston, Maine) is a freelance magazine writer who writes about technology in a pop-culture context. ... John Dickerson is chief political correspondent for Slate magazine. ... Elisabeth Eaves (born 1971 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is author of Bare: On Women, Dancing, Sex, and Power (Knopf 2002, ISBN 0375412336), a non-fiction book about stripping. ... Edward Jay Epstein, born in 1935, is an American investigative journalist. ... Daniel Gross is an American author, and writes for Slates Moneybox column. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born in Portsmouth, England April 13, 1949) is an author, journalist and literary critic. ... Fred Kaplan is a journalist and contributor to Slate magazine. ... Mickey Kaus is a journalist and author best known form writing Kausfiles, a mostly political blog featured on Slate. ... Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... Steven Landsburg Steven Landsburg is a libertarian American and professor of economics at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York. ... Dahlia Lithwick is a senior editor at Slate. ... Eric Liu (劉柏川 born 1968) is a Chinese American writer living in Seattle, Washington. ... Stephen Michael Metcalf was a Democratic member of the North Carolina General Assembly representing the states forty-ninth Senate district, including constituents in Buncombe county. ... Timothy Noah is the Chatterbox columnist for Slate Magazine and a contributing editor to The Washington Monthly. ... Robert Pinsky 15 May 2005 Robert Pinsky (born October 20, 1940) is an American poet and former Poet Laureate of the United States (1997-2000). ... William Saletan is the chief national correspondent at Slate. ... Jack Shafer writes the PressBox column for Slate. ... Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ... Jacob Weisberg (born 1964) is an American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as editor of Slate magazine. ... Emily Yoffe is a journalist, a regular contributor to Slate magazine and the NPR radio show Day to Day. ... Dear Prudence is an advice column appearing weekly in the online magazine Slate and syndicated to over 200 newspapers. ...

Other recurring features

  • The Book Club
  • Culturebox
  • Foreigners
  • Dispatches
  • Books
  • Fashion
  • Shopping
  • Gaming
  • The Movie Club
  • Science

Summary Columns:

  • Today's Blogs
  • In Other Magazines
  • Summary Judgement (with NPR's Day to Day)

NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Day to Day is a one-hour weekday American radio newsmagazine distributed by National Public Radio (NPR), and produced by NPR in collaboration with Slate. ...

Other notable contributors

Anne Applebaum (born 1964) is a journalist and author who has written extensively about issues related to communism and the development of civil society in Eastern Europe and the USSR / Russia. ... Ian Bremmer (born November 12, 1969) is a political scientist specializing on US foreign policy, states in transition, and global political risk. ... Cyrus Farivar, North Gate Hall, UC Berkeley Cyrus John Farivar (IPA: , born January 2, 1982 in Santa Monica, California) is an assistant editor at Macworld magazine and is a freelance technology journalist living in the city of Oakland, California. ... Franklin Foer is an American political journalist and the current editor of The New Republic. ... Robert Lane Greene is an American journalist, best known for his work for the Global Agenda section of the Economists web site, and the Economist magazine. ... David Helvarg David Helvarg (born April 10, 1951) is an American journalist and environmental activist. ... Daniel Radosh is a New York based journalist and blogger whose writing has appeared in several publications, including Details, Entertainment Weekly, Esquire, GQ, Mademoiselle, McSweeney’s, Might, New York Magazine, The New York Times, The New Yorker, Playboy, Salon, Slate, Spin, and Talk Magazine. ... Witold Rybczynski (born in 1943, in Edinburgh, Scotland), is a Canadian architect, professor and writer. ... Judith Shulevitz is a writer on religion and literature whose articles for the New York Times and the on-line Slate magazine. ... James Surowiecki (born 1967) is a staff writer at The New Yorker magazine, where he writes a regular column on business. ... Robert Wright. ... Tim Wu is a professor at Columbia law school and a contributor to Slate Magazine. ... Fareed Zakaria Fareed Zakaria (born January 20, 1964, Mumbai, India) is a writer and journalist specializing in international relations. ... David Edelstein is the chief film critic for New York Magazine, as well as the film critic for NPRs Fresh Air and CBS Sunday Morning. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Slate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (455 words)
Slate is a fine-grained, homogeneous, metamorphic rock derived from an original shale-type sedimentary rock composed of clay or volcanic ash through low grade regional metamorphism.
Slate is mainly composed of quartz and muscovite or illite, often along with biotite, chlorite, hematite, and pyrite along with, less frequently, apatite, graphite, kaolin, magnetite, tourmaline, or zircon.
Slate is also found in the Arctic and was used by the Inuit to make the blades for ulus.
Slate (magazine) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (722 words)
Slate is an online news and culture magazine created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and owned by Microsoft (as part of MSN).
Slate's focus and editorial slant is politically liberal, as seen in choice of columnists, choice of and position on topics, and featured cartoon: Doonesbury.
Timothy Noah is the only Slate staffer who initially opposed the U.S. invasion, and even he was persuaded to abandon his relatively dovish position by Colin Powell, as he documented in Chatterbox Goes to War.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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