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Encyclopedia > Skunk
Skunk
Striped skunk
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Caniformia
Family: Mephitidae
Genera

Conepatus
Mydaus
Mephitis
Spilogale
Polecat is a name used to describe many things: A polecat is a type of weasel found in Europe. ... Look up skunk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The striped skunks show up in our neighborhood every summer from July onward, and have been quite the nuisance to anyone who likes to go out for an evening stroll. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn3. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Families Canidae Felidae Herpestidae Hyaenidae Mephitidae Mustelidae Nandiniidae Odobenidae Pinnipedia Procyonidae Ursidae Viverridae The diverse order Carnivora includes over 260 placental mammals. ... Species See text. ... Mydaus is a genus of Old World carnivore comprising of two species of stink badger. ... Binomial name Mephitis mephitis Schreber, 1776 The Striped Skunk, Mephitis mephitis, is an omnivorous mammal of the skunk family Mephitidae. ... Species Spilogale gracilis Merriam, 1890 Spilogale putorius (Linnaeus, 1758) Spilogale pygmaea Thomas, 1898 The Eastern Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius) of the family Mephitidae is smaller and more weasel-like than the striped skunk. ...

Skunks are mammals, usually with black-and-white fur, that are best known for their ability to excrete a strong, foul-smelling odour. They belong to the family Mephitidae[1][2] and to the order Carnivora. There are 11 species of skunks, which are divided into four genera: Mephitis (hooded and striped skunks, two species), Spilogale (spotted skunks, two species), Mydaus (stink badgers, two species), and Conepatus (hog-nosed skunks, five species). The two skunk species in the Mydaus genus inhabit Indonesia and the Philippines; all other skunks inhabit the Americas from Canada to central South America. Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... For other uses, see Fur (disambiguation). ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Mephitis mephitis Schreber, 1776 The Striped Skunk, Mephitis mephitis, is an omnivorous mammal of the skunk family Mephitidae. ... Species Spilogale gracilis Merriam, 1890 Spilogale putorius (Linnaeus, 1758) Spilogale pygmaea Thomas, 1898 The Eastern Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius) of the family Mephitidae is smaller and more weasel-like than the striped skunk. ... Mydaus is a genus of Old World carnivore comprising of two species of stink badger. ... Species See text. ... An illustration of a hog-nosed skunk by Louis Agassiz Fuertes. ... World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


Skunks were formerly considered to be a subfamily of the Mustelidae family of weasels and related animals (where some taxonomists still place them), but recent genetic evidence shows that they are not as closely related to the Mustelidae as formerly thought.[2]. Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ...


Skunks are sometimes called polecats because of their visual similarity to the European polecat (Mustela putorius), a member of the Mustelidae family. Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Binomial name Mustela putorius (Linnaeus, 1758) This article is about one species of mammal referred to as Polecat. For other uses, see Polecat (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ...

Contents

Physical description

Skunk species vary in size from about 15.6 inches (40 cm) to 37 in. (70 cm) and in weight from about 1.1 lb. (0.5 kg) (the spotted skunks) to 18 lb. (4.5 kg) (the hog-nosed skunks) They have a moderately elongated body with reasonably short, well-muscled legs, and long front claws for digging. Although the most common fur color is black and white, some skunks are brown or gray, and a few are cream-colored. All skunks are striped, even from birth. They may have a single thick stripe across back and tail, two thinner stripes, or a series of white spots and broken stripes (in the case of the spotted skunk). Some also have stripes on their legs. An illustration of a hog-nosed skunk by Louis Agassiz Fuertes. ... Cat claw A claw is a curved pointed appendage, found at the end of a toe or finger or, in arthropods, of the tarsus. ...


Anal scent glands

The best-known, most distinctive, and often most notorious feature of skunks is their anal scent glands, which they can use as a defensive weapon. They are similar to, though much more developed than, the glands found in species of the Mustelidae family. Skunks have two glands, one on either side of the anus, that produce a mixture of sulfur-containing chemicals (methyl and butyl thiols) that has a highly offensive smell that can be described as a combination of the odors of rotten eggs, garlic and burnt rubber. The odor of the fluid is strong enough to ward off bears and other potential attackers, and can be difficult to remove from clothing. Muscles located next to the scent glands allow them to spray with high accuracy as far as 2 to 5 metres (7 to 15 ft). The smell aside, the spray can cause irritation and even temporary blindness, and is sufficiently powerful to be detected by even an insensitive human nose anywhere up to a mile downwind. Their chemical defense, though unusual, is effective, as illustrated by this extract from Charles Darwin's The Voyage of the Beagle: Illustration showing the location of the anal glands in a typical dog. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... In chemistry a methyl-group is a hydrophobic Alkyl functional group which is derived from methane (CH4). ... In organic chemistry, butyl is a four-carbon alkyl substituent with chemical formula -C4H9 . ... Sulphydryl // In organic chemistry, a thiol is a compound that contains the functional group composed of a sulfur atom and a hydrogen atom (-SH). ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... For other meanings, see Bear (disambiguation). ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... A watercolour by HMS Beagles draughtsman, Conrad Martens. ...

We saw also a couple of Zorillos, or skunks,--odious animals, which are far from uncommon. In general appearance the Zorillo resembles a polecat, but it is rather larger, and much thicker in proportion. Conscious of its power, it roams by day about the open plain, and fears neither dog nor man. If a dog is urged to the attack, its courage is instantly checked by a few drops of the fetid oil, which brings on violent sickness and running at the nose. Whatever is once polluted by it, is for ever useless. Azara says the smell can be perceived at a league distant; more than once, when entering the harbour of Monte Video, the wind being off shore, we have perceived the odour on board the "Beagle." Certain it is, that every animal most willingly makes room for the Zorillo.[3]

Skunks are reluctant to use their smelly weapon, as they carry just enough of the chemical for five or six uses—about 15 cc—and require some ten days to produce another supply. Their bold black and white colouring however serves to make the skunk's appearance memorable. Where practical, it is to a skunk's advantage to simply warn a threatening creature off without expending scent: the black and white warning colour aside, threatened skunks will go through an elaborate routine of hisses and foot stamping and tail-high threat postures before resorting to the spray. Interestingly, skunks will not spray other skunks (with the exception of males in the mating season); though they fight over den space in autumn, they do so with tooth and claw.


The singular musk-spraying ability of the skunk has not escaped the attention of biologists: the names of the family and the most common genus (Mephitidae, Mephitis) mean "stench", and Spilogale putorius means "stinking spotted weasel". The word skunk is a corruption of an Abenaki name for them, segongw or segonku, which means "one who squirts" in the Algonquian dialect. The Abenaki (also Wabanuok or Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ...


Most predatory animals of the Americas, such as wolves, foxes and badgers, seldom attack skunks—presumably out of fear of being sprayed. The exception is the great horned owl, the animal's only serious predator, which, like most birds, has a poor-to-nonexistent sense of smell. This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... This article is about the animal. ... For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Gmelin, 1788) Distribution Subspecies see text Synonyms Strix virginiana Gmelin, 1788 The Great Horned Owl, Bubo virginianus, is a very large owl native to North and South America. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ...


Skunk spray is composed mainly of low molecular weight thiol compounds,[4] namely (E)-2-butene-1-thiol, 3-methyl-1-butanethiol and (E)-2-butenyl thioacetate.[5] These compounds are detectable at concentrations of about 2 parts per million. Sulphydryl // In organic chemistry, a thiol is a compound that contains the functional group composed of a sulfur atom and a hydrogen atom (-SH). ...


Scent removal

Removing the scent from objects or creatures can be difficult. Some home remedies suggest using tomato juice or vinegar. A more complex and effective remedy includes application of a mixture containing hydrogen peroxide, baking soda, and liquid soap.[6] The thiols, which are responsible for the odor, are not water soluble, even with soap, but the baking soda catalyzes the oxidative ability of the peroxide, which oxidizes the thiols into highly water-soluble sulfonates. In an episode of the television program MythBusters, the hydrogen peroxide mix was found to be the most effective smell removal agent.[7] A home remedy is a treatment or cure for a disease or other ailment that employs certain foods or other common household items. ... Tomato juice is a juice made from squeezed tomatoes. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... R-phrases , , , , S-phrases , , , ,, , , , Flash point Non-flammable Related Compounds Related compounds Water Ozone Hydrazine Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a very pale blue liquid which appears colourless in... Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), or sodium hydrogen carbonate, also known as baking soda and bicarbonate of soda, is a soluble white anhydrous or crystalline compound, with a slight alkaline taste resembling that of sodium carbonate. ... Soap most commonly appears in bar form. ... In chemistry and biology, catalysis (in Greek meaning to annul) is the acceleration of the rate of a chemical reaction by means of a substance, called a catalyst, that is itself unchanged chemically by the overall reaction. ... The most fundamental reactions in chemistry are the redox processes. ... The structure of a typical sulfonate group. ... MythBusters is an American popular science television program on the Discovery Channel starring special effects experts Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who use basic elements of the scientific method to test the validity of various rumors and urban legends in popular culture. ...


From Popular Science Aug. 2007, chemist Paul Krebaum provided the recipe for the bathing concoction. One quart of 3% hydrogen peroxide, one quarter cup of baking soda, and one teaspoon of liquid soap. Bathe your pet in this solution and rinse with tap water. Krebaum warned that there is no way to store this potion. "If you put the ingredients in a bottle, the whole thing would explode." In Kilauea, Hawaii he invented the ssr "skunk scent remover"


Behavior

Skunks are crepuscular, and are solitary animals when not breeding, though in the colder parts of their range they may gather in communal dens for warmth. During the day they shelter in burrows that they dig with their powerful front claws, or in other man-made or natural hollows as the opportunity arises. Both sexes occupy overlapping home ranges through the greater part of the year; typically 2 to 4 km² for females, up to 20 km² for males. Adult Firefly or Lightning Bug – a Crepuscular Beetle Photuris lucicrescens Crepuscular is a term used to describe animals that are primarily active during the twilight. ... Look up Solitary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In biology, the range of an species is the geographical area within which that species can be found. ...


Unlike the fictional "Flower" in the movie Bambi, real skunks do not hibernate in the winter. However they do remain generally inactive and feed rarely. They often overwinter in a huddle of one male and multiple (as many as twelve) females. The same winter den is often repeatedly used whether under a house or in a tree. Bambi is a 1942 animated feature produced by Walt Disney and originally released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942. ...


Although they have excellent senses of smell and hearing — vital attributes in a crepuscular omnivore — they have poor vision. They cannot see objects more than about 3 metres away with any clarity, which makes them very vulnerable to road traffic. Roughly half of all skunk deaths are caused by humans, as roadkill, or as a result of shooting and poisoning. They are short-lived animals: fewer than 10% survive for longer than three years. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For the professional wrestler known as Roadkill, see Michael Depoli, for the movie marketed as Roadkill in the UK and Australia, see Joy Ride, for the Supernatural TV series episode, see Roadkill (Supernatural). ... For other uses, see Poison (disambiguation). ...


Bites

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded 2,223 cases of rabies in skunks in the United States for the year 2000 - about 31% of reported cases in all species. Skunks trail raccoons as vectors of rabies, although this varies regionally (raccoons dominate along the Atlantic coast and eastern Gulf of Mexico, skunks throughout the Midwest and down to the western Gulf, and in California). Despite this prevalence, all recorded cases of human rabies from 1990-2002 are attributed by the CDC to dogs or bats. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, is recognized as the leading United States agency for protecting the public health and safety of people. ...


In case of a skunk bite, follow these directions as a precaution against rabies or other infection. (If a situation with a biting animal is out of control, call emergency services immediately.) If possible without further injury, retain the skunk, dead or alive, to assess and prevent the risk of spreading disease - if the animal is dead, place on ice or refrigerate. Wash the wound thoroughly with antibacterial soap and water. Place pressure to stop any bleeding. See your doctor or emergency medical services as soon as possible - within no more than 72 hours, and sooner depending on the severity of the wound or any difficulties in stopping bleeding. Call your local animal control agency to take the skunk away. Ask to have it tested for rabies. Once a doctor has looked over the wound, ask if a tetanus shot is necessary or recommended (tetanus vaccinations are typically good for ten years). When the test results are finished on the skunk, you will be told if you should get the post-exposure rabies vaccine series or not.


Diet

Skunks are omnivorous, eating both plant and animal material, changing their diet as the seasons change. They eat invertebrates (insects and their larvae, found by digging, and earthworms) as well as small vertebrates (rodents, lizards, salamanders, frogs, snakes, birds, moles, and eggs), also, they eat berries, roots, leaves, grasses, fungi, nuts, and just about everything else. In settled areas, skunks also seek human garbage. Less often, skunks may be found acting as scavengers, eating bird and rodent carcasses left by cats or other animals. Pet owners, particularly those of cats, may experience a skunk finding its way into a garage or basement where wet or dry pet food is kept. Omnivores are organisms that consume both plants and animals. ... Invertebrate is a term coined by Chevalier de Lamarck to describe any animal without a backbone or vertebra, like insects, squids and worms. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... Larvae are the plural of larva, juvenile form of animals with indirect development. ... For the LPG album, see The Earthworm (album). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... For other uses, see Lizard (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salamander (disambiguation). ... Distribution of frogs (in black) Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia - List of Anuran families The frogness babe is an amphibian in the order Anura (meaning tail-less from Greek an-, without + oura, tail), formerly referred to as Salientia (Latin saltare, to jump). ... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... For a person who scavenges, see Waste picker. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ...


Reproduction

Breeding usually takes place in early spring. The males are polygynous, which means that there are more females than males. Females excavate a den for between one and four young to be born in May. Skunks are placental, and their gestation period is around 66 days. Four to seven kits are born. When born, the kits are blind, deaf, and covered in a soft layer of fur. After three weeks, the kit's eyes open, and they are covered in a soft, glossy, thick fur. The male plays no part in raising the young and may even kill them. A common and amusing scene in late spring and summer is a mother skunk followed by a line of her kits. The kits are weaned after around two months. The kits generally stay with their mother for around one year, when they will be ready to mate. The mother is very protective, and will often spray at any sign of danger. The term polygyny (Greek: poly many, gynaika woman) is used in related ways in social anthropology and sociobiology. ...


As a skunk's odor is generally considered to be offensive, people living in areas known to be inhabited by skunks are advised to take certain precautions to prevent skunks from taking up residence where they are not wanted. As skunks commonly make their dens in wood or junk piles, it is recommended that these be kept to a minimum. Skunks are scavengers and frequently go after garbage. Garbage should be stored in tightly sealed cans.


Another common method of discouraging skunks is to use a general purpose pesticide on the grounds to reduce the occurrence of the insects upon which skunks feed. This method has its weak points though. By aiming at skunks indirectly the impact on the above mentioned grounds and their insect population is huge.


A fence extending one or two feet into the ground is sufficient to prevent skunks from making a den underneath a house or other structure. If a skunk should take up residence under the building, bags filled with mothballs or washcloths drenched with ammonia can be used to encourage skunks to leave. Securing a rope to the bag or cloth will make removal easy later on. Flour or other non-toxic white powder can be sprinkled around the den entrance to track foot prints. One should check for fresh foot prints from the skunk leading out, but not going back in. It is better to check in the morning as the skunks will be more likely to be active at night.


After all the skunks have left, one should then block up any entrances that the skunk may have used along with the entrance to the skunk's den. If it is suspected that there are more skunks living in the den, a door should be constructed at the den's entrance that is hinged at the top, and extends approximately six inches (15 cm) beyond the entrance. It should be placed at a right angle to the direction of travel and should not be air tight. This can be an effective technique as it allows the skunks to exit their den, but makes it difficult for them to get back in.


Domestication

Main article: Pet skunk

Domesticated skunks can legally be kept as pets in the UK but they are legal only in certain U.S. states. Mephitis mephitis, the striped skunk species, is the most social skunk and the one most commonly domesticated. When the skunk is kept as a pet, the scent gland is removed, which involves a process that some people object to as cruelty. Typical life spans for domesticated skunks are considerably longer than for wild skunks, often reaching 10 years, though it is not unusual for a well cared skunk to live well past 20 years. One problem with U.S. Skunks kept as pets is genetic problems due to a lack of genetic diversity. The few breeders of skunks are using the same genetic stock (as none are allowed to be taken from the wild) that was available many decades ago, when skunks were bred for the fur trade instead of the pet trade. Many problems such as undescended testicles, epileptic siezures, etc. are often found with the domestic stock. Some skunks were reported by European settlers in America as being kept as pets by certain Native Americans. The Pilgrims are said to have kept skunks as pets.[citation needed] A pet skunk is a skunk kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment. ... Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... A pet skunk is a skunk kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment. ... This article is about animals kept for companionship. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ...

Classification

Genera Alopex Atelocynus Canis Cerdocyon Chrysocyon Cuon Cynotherium † Dusicyon † Dasycyon † Fennecus (Part of Vulpes) Lycalopex (Part of Pseudalopex) Lycaon Nyctereutes Otocyon Pseudalopex Speothos Urocyon Vulpes The Canidae (′kanə′dÄ“, IPA: ) family is a part of the order Carnivora within the mammals (Class Mammalia). ... For other meanings, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Genera Procyon Nasua Cyonasua - extinct Chapalmalania - extinct Nasuella Bassariscus Bassaricyon Potos Procyonidae is a family of carnivores which includes the raccoons, coatis and others. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Binomial name Ailurus fulgens Cuvier, 1825 The Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens Latin fire colored cat) Chinese: 小熊貓; (pinyin: xiǎo xióng māo) or lesser panda, is a mostly vegetarian cat-sized (60 cm long) mammal. ... The striped skunks show up in our neighborhood every summer from July onward, and have been quite the nuisance to anyone who likes to go out for an evening stroll. ... Binomial name Mephitis macroura Lichtenstein 1832 The hooded skunk, Mephitis macroura, is similar to the striped skunk, but can be distinguished by its longer tail and longer, softer coat of fur. ... Binomial name Spilogale gracilis The Western Spotted Skunk (Spilogale gracilis) is a spotted skunk found throughout the western United States, northern Mexico, and southwestern British Columbia. ... The Channel Islands Spotted Skunk (Spilogale gracilis amphiala) is a unique subspecies of North American skunk about which little is known. ... The Eastern Spotted Skunk is a small, relatively slender skunk with small white spot on its forehead and another in front of each ear, the latter often confluent with a dorsolateral white stripe. ... Binomial name Thomas, 1898 The Pygmy Spotted Skunk (Spilogale pygmaea) is a species of mammal in the Mephitidae family. ... The western hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus mesoleucus) is a species of hog-nosed skunk native to the Americas. ... Binomial name Conepatus leuconotus (Lichtenstein, 1832) The eastern hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus leuconotus) is a species of hog-nosed skunk, and is the largest skunk in the world, growing to lengths of up to 2. ... Binomial name Conepatus semistriatus (Boddaert, 1785) The Striped Hog-nosed Skunk, Conepatus semistriatus, is a skunk species from Central and South America. ... Binomial name Conepatus chinga (Molina, 1782) The Molinas Hog-nosed Skunk, Conepatus chinga, is a skunk species from South America. ... Binomial name Gray, 1837 The Humboldts Hog-nosed Skunk or Patagonian Hog-nosed Skink (Conepatus humboldtii) is a species of mammal in the Mephitidae family. ... The Javan Stink Badger (Mydaus javanensis, also called the Teledu, Malay Stink Badger and Indonesian Stink Badger) is a member of the badger family endemic to Java. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Binomial name Mydaus marchei (Huet, 1887) The Palawan stink badger is a small badger that lives on the Philippine Islands of Palawan and Busuanga. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... “Feline” redirects here. ... Subfamilies Cryptoproctinae Euplerinae Hemigalinae Paradoxurinae Viverrinae The 35 species of civet, genet and linsang make up the family Viverridae. ... Genera 17 genera, see text The mongoose is any member of the Herpestidae family of small, cat-like carnivores. ... Genera Crocuta Hyaena Parahyaena Proteles Hyenas (or Hyaenas) are moderately large terrestrial carnivores native to Africa and Asia, and members of the family Hyaenidae. ...

References

  1. ^ Don E. Wilson & DeeAnn M. Reeder (2005). Mammal Species of the World. A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed). John Hopkins University Press. 
  2. ^ a b Dragoo and Honeycutt (1997). "Systematics of Mustelid-like Carnvores". Journal of Mammalology 78 (2): 426-443. 
  3. ^ Darwin, Charles (1839). Voyage of the Beagle. ISBN 0-14-043268-X. Retrieved on 2006-06-27. 
  4. ^ "Skunk spray is composed mainly of low molecular weight thiol compounds." Note: Sure Fire Method for De-Scenting Pets Who've had a Close Encounter with a Skunk
  5. ^ Wood W. F., Sollers B. G., Dragoo G. A., Dragoo J. W. (2002). "Volatile Components in Defensive Spray of the Hooked Skunk, Mephitis macroura". Journal of Chemical Ecology 28. doi:10.1023/A:1020573404341. 
  6. ^ "Hydrogen peroxide and baking soda, when combined, become a "chemical engine" for churning out oxygen. That's why it has to be used immediately after mixing. The soap breaks up the oils in the skunk spray, allowing the other ingredients to do their work" Deskunking Dogs, Cats, and Other Pets For use on clothing, furniture, and anything of fabric, use the solution Nature's Cure usually found at large animal stores.
  7. ^ "In the tradition of the stinky pigs, Jamie and Adam volunteered to get skunked in order to test various stink remedies." Unofficial Mythbusters
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