FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Skiing" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Skiing
Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland.
Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland.
A ski jumper utilising the V-style in Calgary, Canada.
A ski jumper utilising the V-style in Calgary, Canada.
This article is about snow skiing. For water skiing, see water skiing. For other related articles, see ski (disambiguation)

Snow skiing is a group of sports and activities holding in common the use of skis, devices which slide on snow and attach with ski bindings and ski boots to people's feet. Skiing sports differ from snowshoeing in that skis slide, and they differ from ice-skating, water skiing, and in-line skating by being performed on snow. Although snowboarding shares the general characteristics of skiing sports, it evolved from surfing and skateboarding and so is not considered a type of skiing. Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2197x1260, 950 KB) Summary en: Cross-country skiing on Schwedentritt loppet, Einsiedeln, Switzerland de: Langlauf (Skating-Stil) auf der Loipe Schwedentritt, Einsiedeln, Schweiz Photographer: Markus Bernet Date: 02/12/2006 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Cross... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2197x1260, 950 KB) Summary en: Cross-country skiing on Schwedentritt loppet, Einsiedeln, Switzerland de: Langlauf (Skating-Stil) auf der Loipe Schwedentritt, Einsiedeln, Schweiz Photographer: Markus Bernet Date: 02/12/2006 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Cross... Einsiedeln is a small municipality in Switzerland best known for its monastery, the Benedictine Einsiedeln Abbey and as place where Paracelsus born. ... Image File history File links Calgary. ... Image File history File links Calgary. ... 2006 Winter Olympics logo for ski jumping demonstrating the V-style The V-style of ski jumping was created by Jan Boklöv of Sweden in 1985. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... // Water skiing began in 1922 when Ralph Samuelson strapped two boards to his feet and rigged a clothesline up to his boat on Lake Pepin in Lake City, Minnesota. ... Look up ski in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A shaped, twin-tip alpine ski. ... In skiing, a ski binding is an attachment which anchors the ski boot to the ski. ... Ski boots are specialized footwear that are used in skiing to provide protection and warmth for the foot in snowy and icy conditions, along with a way to attach the skier to skis using ski bindings so that skiers ski over snow. ... Snowshoers in Bryce Canyon Snowshoes are a form of footwear devised for travelling over snow. ... Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is traveling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without the boots, tied to regular footwear). ... // Water skiing began in 1922 when Ralph Samuelson strapped two boards to his feet and rigged a clothesline up to his boat on Lake Pepin in Lake City, Minnesota. ... Roller skating girl in Rome, Italy (soul grind) Roller skating is travelling on smooth terrain with roller skates. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... Snowboarder in a half-pipe Snowboarder riding off cornice Snowboarding contributes greatly to the economies of ski resorts Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a snow-covered slope on a snowboard that is attached to ones feet using a boot/binding interface. ... For other uses, see Surfing (disambiguation). ... A skateboarder performing a frontside lipslide Skateboarding is the act of rolling on or performing tricks with a skateboard. ...


Skiing can be grouped into two general categories. Nordic skiing is the oldest category and includes sport that evolved from skiing as done in Scandinavia. Nordic style ski bindings attach at the toes of the skier's ski boots, but not at the heels. Alpine skiing includes sports that evolved from skiing as done in the Alps. Alpine bindings attach at both the toe and the heel of ski boots. These two categories overlap with some sports potentially fitting into both. However, binding style and history indicate that each skiing sport is more one than the other. Some skiing sports such as Telemark skiing have elements of both categories, but its history in Telemark, Norway and free-heel binding style place Telemark skiing firmly in the Nordic category. Nordic skiing is a winter sport that encompasses all types of skiing where the heel of the boot cannot be fixed to the ski. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... In skiing, a ski binding is an attachment which anchors the ski boot to the ski. ... Ski boots are specialized footwear that are used in skiing to provide a way to attach the skier to skis using ski bindings. ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ski boots are specialized footwear that are used in skiing to provide a way to attach the skier to skis using ski bindings. ... Telemark skiing is a term used for skiing using the Telemark turn, which is a technique first popularized by Sondre Norheim. ... For other uses, see Telemark (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of skiing
A Sami skier as seen by Olaus Magnus
A Sami skier as seen by Olaus Magnus

Skiing was originally a practical way of getting from one place to another in packed or crusted snow. In Norse Myth, skiing was invented by Skadi, the snowshoe goddess.[1] The word "ski" entered the English language from Norwegian in 1890. Previous to that time, English speakers considered skiing to be a type of snowshoeing. In countries where loose snow dominates, the indigenous population developed snowshoes that did not slide rather than skis which do[citation needed]. Today's cross-country and most other types of Nordic skiing are the modern style reminiscent of ancient skiing. Skiing, or traveling over snow on wooden runners, has a recorded history of almost five millennia. ... Image File history File links Skigudinne. ... Image File history File links Skigudinne. ... The Sami people (also Sámi, Saami, Lapps, sometimes also Laplanders) are the indigenous people of Sápmi, which today encompasses parts of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. ... Olaus Magnus, or Magni (Magnus, Latin for the Swedish Stora -- great -- is the family name, and not a personal epithet), reported as born in October 1490 in Linköping, and died on August 1, 1557, was a Swedish ecclesiastic and writer, who did pioneering work for the interest of Nordic... For other uses, see Snowshoe (disambiguation). ... Cross-Country trails are often less crowded than Alpine ski slopes. ... Nordic skiing is a winter sport that encompasses all types of skiing where the heel of the boot cannot be fixed to the ski. ...


The Norwegian Sondre Norheim from Morgedal is called the "father of modern skiing". In the 19th century, Norheim allegedly improved the bindings to better turn while skiing down hills. One form of skiing was called Slalom (sla låm, Norwegian dialect expression for a beginner's track) by Norheim and his contemporaries. The skiing techniques of 19th century Morgedal was reinvented as Telemark skiing or telemarking in the 1970s. Sondre Norheim (June 10, 1825 - March 9, 1897) was the pioneer of modern skiing. ... Morgedal, of the municipality of Kviteseid in the county of Telemark Norway, is called the cradle of skiing. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... In skiing, a ski binding is an attachment which anchors the ski boot to the ski. ... Slalom from the Morgedal dialect of Norwegian slalÃ¥m: sla, meaning slightly inclining hillside, and lÃ¥m, meaning track after skis. ... Telemark skiing is a term used for skiing using the Telemark turn, which is a technique first popularized by Sondre Norheim. ...


The invention of firmer bindings to anchor the skier's feet to the ski, attributed to Austrian Mathias Zdarsky, enabled the skier to turn more effectively and led to the development of Alpine, or Downhill, skiing. Mathias Zdarsky (born 25 February 1856 in Kozichowitz near Třebíč District of Czech Republic; died 20 June 1940 in St. ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ...


Shortly thereafter, in the early 20th century, Austrian Hannes Schneider pioneered the idea of rotating the body to help steer the skis. Soon this Arlberg technique, named for his home region, spread around the world and helped make skiing a popular recreational activity. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Johannes Schneider (1890-April 25, 1955) or Hannes Schneider was an Austrian Ski instructor of the first half of the twentieth century. ... The stem technique in skiing is usually credited to Mathias Zdarsky, from Austria, who invented it in the 1890s. ...


Skiing burns around 350 calories every 3 hours, better get down to the slopes then!


Types of skiing

Alpine skier carving a turn on piste
Alpine skier carving a turn on piste
Alpine skier racing
Alpine skier racing
Emergency medical technicians evacuating an injured skier from a ski area
Emergency medical technicians evacuating an injured skier from a ski area

Skiing is a pastime which has brought together all cultures of today. Many different types of skiing are popular, especially in colder climates, and many types of competitive skiing events are recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the International Ski Federation (FIS), and other sporting organizations. Skiing is most visible to the public during the Winter Olympic Games where it is a major sport. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3331x2187, 621 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Skiing Alpine skiing Suicide Six Cortina dAmpezzo Skis Rossignol Deer Valley Sundance Ragged Mountain Resort Dartmouth Skiway... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3331x2187, 621 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Skiing Alpine skiing Suicide Six Cortina dAmpezzo Skis Rossignol Deer Valley Sundance Ragged Mountain Resort Dartmouth Skiway... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x616, 178 KB) A CMSC (Chicago Metro Ski Council) downhill Ski Racer running a gate at Wilmot Mountain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x616, 178 KB) A CMSC (Chicago Metro Ski Council) downhill Ski Racer running a gate at Wilmot Mountain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x676, 128 KB) Summary In this photograph, emergency medical technicians of the North Lake Tahoe Fire District are loading a patient into an ambulance for transport to a hospital. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x676, 128 KB) Summary In this photograph, emergency medical technicians of the North Lake Tahoe Fire District are loading a patient into an ambulance for transport to a hospital. ... The Star of Life, a global symbol for medical service EMTs loading an injured skier into an ambulance An Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) is an emergency responder trained to provide emergency medical services to the critically ill and injured. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... The International Ski Federation/Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) is the main international organisation of ski sports. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ...


In skiing's traditional core regions in the snowy parts of Scandinavia, as well as in places such as Alaska, both recreational and competitive skiing is as likely to refer to the cross-country variants as to the internationally downhill variants. For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Cross-Country trails are often less crowded than Alpine ski slopes. ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ...


For most people in the United States excluding Alaska, the term "skiing" refers to alpine skiing where one visits a ski resort, purchases a lift ticket, dons cold-weather clothing, skis, ski boots and ski poles, and embarks on a chairlift, gondola lift, or other means of mechanical uphill transport. Upon reaching the summit, the skier disembarks from the ski lift and travels downhill, propelled by gravity, usually along a marked route known as a piste, "run," "trail," or "slope". Most ski resorts use mechanical equipment to "groom," or pack down and smooth, the snow surface on certain ski trails. Grooming is normally associated with trails of lesser difficulty. Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... St. ... A shaped, twin-tip alpine ski. ... Ski boots are specialized footwear that are used in skiing to provide a way to attach the skier to skis using ski bindings. ... This skiers poles are tucked under his arms. ... Hunter Mountain chairlift A chairlift in Bad Hofgastein, Austria A chairlift (technically, an elevated passenger ropeway), is a type of aerial lift, which consists of a continuously circulating steel cable loop strung between two end terminals and usually over intermediate towers, carrying a series of chairs. ... Tochal gondola lift carry tourists and skiers to Tochal mountain,Tehran, Iran. ... A topographical summit is a point on a surface which is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. ... A chairlift A chairlift is a type of aerial lift, which consists of a constantly moving loop of steel cable strung between two end terminals and generally over intermediate towers. ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... A piste is the name given to a marked ski-run or path down a mountain for the purposes of skiing, snowboarding, or other mountain sports. ...


Alpine skiing developed in the Alps beginning in 1889. In Winterthur, Switzerland, Odd Kjelsberg may have been the first person in the Alps to try skiing. Previous to this time, the predominate Alpine winter sport had been tobogganing. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Location within Switzerland Winterthur is a city in the Canton of Zurich in Switzerland. ... A toboggan is a simple sled used on snow, to carry one or more people (often children) down a hill or other slope, for recreation. ...


Skiing techniques are difficult to master, and accordingly there are ski schools that teach everything from the basics of turning and stopping safely to more advanced carving, racing, mogul or "bump" skiing and newer freestyle techniques. There are two primary types of downhill skiing -- "telemark" and "alpine." A ski school is an establishment that trains skiers. ... Moguls are bumps in a ski slope formed when skiers cut grooves in the snow as they execute turns. ...


For beginning skiers learning under a trained instructor, skiing speeds are low, the terrain is not steep and is often well-manicured, and the risks are relatively low. For extreme skiers, testing their expert abilities against ever more challenging terrain, the risks may be much higher.


Randonnée Skiing: Randonnée is also called off-piste, ski mountaineering, and Alpine touring. Off-piste skiing includes skiing in unmarked or unpatrolled areas either within the ski resort's boundaries or in the backcountry, frequently amongst trees ("glade skiing"), usually in pursuit of fresh fallen snow, known as powder. A brevet or randonnée is an organised long-distance bicycle ride. ... Ski mountaineering is a sport that combines the techniques of skiing (often ski touring) with those of mountaineering. ... Backcountry skiing or off-piste skiing is skiing in a sparsely inhabited rural region, where fixed mechanical means of ascent (chairlifts, cable cars etc. ... St. ... For the skiing style, see. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ...


Randonnée skiers typically use Alpine style skis and boots but with bindings that can be released at the heel for easier movement on flat and uphill terrain. For traveling up-hill randonnée skiers often use skins, strips of fabric temporarily glued to the bottoms of the skis.


Skiing or snowboarding outside a ski resort's boundaries, also known as Off-Site skiing, is illegal in some ski resorts, due to the danger of avalanches on the un-patrolled areas; or the cost of search-and-rescue for lost or overdue skiers. France and Canada are two of the few countries generally permitting this activity. In the United States, Off-Site skiing regulations vary by ski area; many ski resorts prohibit it and some simply post warning signs that skiers are leaving the patrolled ski area boundaries. St. ... The toe of an avalanche in Alaskas Kenai Fjords. ... !-- Spelling: UK --> For the TV series of this title, see Search and Rescue (TV series). ...


In all regions, randonnée skiing is perfectly legal, provided the skier has not skied from a designated ski area after buying a ticket. Some areas do allow departure from the ski area while on skis, others do not. Normally, skiing out of bounds results in loss of the lift ticket and banishment from the ski area. On the other hand, skiing in a closed area is illegal and likely to land a skier in jail.


However, lost or overdue backcountry travellers are usually held responsible for the cost of search-and-rescue service if uninsured. Backcountry skiers traveling in steep terrain prone to avalanches are encouraged to take avalanche training, travel with other experienced people, and carry special equipment for self-rescue. It is recommended that skiers make the local ski patrol aware of where they are going if they stray off-piste in case of avalanches or bad weather that could put skiers in danger.


Telemark Skiing: Telemark skiers use flexible ski boots, either leather or plastic, and do not have their heels locked to the skis. Alpine skiers use stiffer plastic, non-flexible boots and have their heels locked to the skis with releaseable bindings. The venue, speed and technical difficulty associated with the sport can lead to collisions, accidents, hypothermia and other injury or illness, occasionally including death. Regional Ski Patrol organizations, such as the National Ski Patrol in the U.S., exist as a voluntary organization to provide guidance, help, medical assistance and emergency rescue to those in need of it. For other uses, see Telemark (disambiguation). ... Madrid Arena is a multi-purpose arena. ... Hypothermia is a condition in which an organisms temperature drops below that Required fOr normal metabolism and Bodily functionS. In warm-blooded animals, core [[body Temperature]] is maintained nEar a constant leVel through biologic [[homEostasis]]. But wheN the body iS exposed to cold Its internal mechanismS may be unable... Ski patroller with toboggan in tow A ski patrol is an organization that provides first aid and rescue services to skiers and participants of other snow sports, either at a ski area or in a backcountry setting. ...


Back Country Skiing: Also called Nordic touring. In the Alps where skiers can easily ski from area to area, Randonée and backcountry skiing are indistinguishable. In North America however, where chairlifts either aren't allowed or are impractical for touring, skiers typically use Nordic style equipment which is more suitable for skiing up-hill. The heels of the bindings always remain free, unlike Randoneé bindings which can be locked down.


Military Skiing: In addition to its role in recreation and sport, skiing is also used as a means of transport by the military, and many armies train troops for ski warfare. Ski troops played a key role in retaining Finnish independence from Russia during the Winter War, and from Germany during the Lapland War, although the use of ski troops was recorded by the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus in the 13th century. The sport of Biathlon was developed from military skiing patrols. For the TV show, see F Troop. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants Finland Soviet Union Commanders Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim Kliment Voroshilov, later Semyon Timoshenko Strength 250,000 men 30 tanks 130 aircraft[1][2] 1,000,000 men 6,541 tanks [3] 3,800 aircraft[4][5] Casualties 26,662 dead 39,886 wounded 1,000 captured[6] 126,875... Combatants Germany Finland Commanders Lothar Rendulic Hjalmar Siilasvuo Strength 200,000 60,000 Casualties 950 killed 2,000 wounded 1,300 captured 774 killed 3,000 wounded 262 missing The Lapland War (Finnish: ; German: ; Swedish: ) is a name used for the hostilities between Finland and Germany between September 1944 and... Saxo, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857 – 1945) Saxo Grammaticus (estimated. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Several biathletes in the shooting area of a competition Biathlon (not to be confused with duathlon) is a term used to describe any sporting event made up of two disciplines. ... In military tactics, to patrol, or conduct a patrol, is to conduct reconnaissance of a designated area or route. ...


Alpine Freestyle: This kind of skiing could be called acrobatics on skis. Alpine freestyle was pioneered by Stein Ericson in 1962. It developed in the 1970s into a style called Hotdogging. More recently Alpine freestyle has evolved into the current style called Jib skiing or New freestyle, a new style of skiing that started in the late 1990s. In this type of skiing, skiers use jumps also called kickers,or rails to do urban style aerial tricks.[2] Kickers is a youth brand created in 1968 that produces a wide range of footwear and clothing. ...


Nordic Skiing: Also called Cross-country skiing. World wide, Nordic skiing may be the most popular form of skiing since it does not require a specially ski area. Typically after donning appropriate clothing, the skier goes outside and skis in a local park or even on a snowy street. Nordic skiing is the oldest form of skiing and was developed in Scandinavia as a way of traveling in the winter. Cross-Country trails are often less crowded than Alpine ski slopes. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ...


Cross-Country Racing: Cross-country skiing takes its name from a type of ski race that is one third up, one third down, and one third flat. The name distinguishes it from other types of ski races and competition such as downhill racing, slalom racing, and Nordic jumping. Cross-country races can be either freestyle or classic. In freestyle racing, any technique is allowed as long as it is human powered and on skis. In a classic race, skating techniques are prohibited. Cross-Country trails are often less crowded than Alpine ski slopes. ... To slalom is to zigzag between obstacles. ...


Nordic Jumping: Also called ski-flying and ski jumping. A competition in which skiers slide down a ramp called a jump and attempt to go the furthest before landing on the ground. This is done with Nordic style skis, meaning that the heels of boot and binding are detached from the ski. The skies are much longer and wider than other types of skis and jumping is typically done without ski-poles. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ski-jumping. ... Ski jumping is a sport in which skiers go down an inrun with a take-off ramp (the jump), attempting to go as far as possible. ...


Kite skiing and para-skiing Skiing done while being pulled or carried by a parasail, hangglider, or kite. Parasailing in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic Parasailing, also known as parascending, is a recreational activity where a person (two or three people may also ride at the same time) is towed behind a vehicle (usually a boat) while attached to a parachute. ... Hang gliding is one of the windsports. ... For other uses, see Kite (disambiguation). ...


Ski jøring Ski jøring is also called Euro-style mushing. Skiing while being pulled by an animal(s),typically dogs or horses, or by snowmachine. Typically dogs or horses are used. A team of six white, husky-type dogs Mushing also means playing on a MUSH. Mushing also can be used to describe the kneading behavior of domestic cats when they are content or are preparing to settle for a nap. ...


Skiing for people with disabilities

Downhill skiing for people with disabilities is both a recreational pastime and a competitive sport open to those with any manner of cognitive and/or physical disabilities. Adaptations include the use of outriggers, ski tip retention devices, sit-skis like monoskis and bi-skis, brightly colored guide bibs, ski guides, and inter-skier communication systems or audible clues for blind skiers. Recreational skiing programs for people with disabilities exist at mountains across the globe. In the northeastern United States, Maine Handicapped Skiing is one of the largest, operating at Sunday River ski resort, Other New England resorts with adaptive skiing programs include: Loon Mountain, Waterville Valley, and Mount Sunapee. In the western part of the United States, the National Sports Center for the Disabled at Winter Park Resort near Denver, Colorado attracts both first-timers and world-class disabled athletes from Europe, Asia, and North America. Currently the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and the International Ski Federation (FIS) sanction a number of regional, national, and international disabled skiing events, most notably a World Cup circuit, a Disabled Alpine Skiing World Championships, and the Paralympic Winter Games. Skiing for people with disabilities became popular after World War II with the return of injured veterans. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1640 KB) Summary Own work Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Snow Snowboard Skiing Ski Utah Snowboarding Ski resort Snowbird ski resort Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1640 KB) Summary Own work Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Snow Snowboard Skiing Ski Utah Snowboarding Ski resort Snowbird ski resort Metadata This file... Inside the Snowbird Cliff Lodge Snowbird is a year-round ski and summer resort located in the U.S. state of Utah on the eastern border of the Salt Lake City suburb of Sandy in the Little Cottonwood Canyon of the Wasatch mountain range in the Rocky Mountains. ... Look up disability in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A hobby is a spare-time recreational pursuit. ... Paralympic alpine skiing is an adaptation of alpine skiing for athletes with a disability. ... The term monoski can refer to either of two unrelated pieces of ski equipment. ... Sunday River is a ski resort located in Newry, Maine, in the United States. ... Loon Mountain is a mountain northeast of Lincoln, New Hampshire, in Grafton County. ... Waterville Valley is a ski resort in the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire. ... Mount Sunapee is a 5-mile-long mountain ridge in the towns of Newbury and Goshen in western New Hampshire. ... Winter Park Resort is a resort in Winter Park, Colorado off U.S. Highway 40 in the Rocky Mountains about an hour and a half from Denver, Colorado. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country State Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... Paralympic alpine skiing is an adaptation of alpine skiing for athletes with a disability. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) is an international non-profit organisation of elite sports for athletes with disabilities. ... The International Ski Federation/Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) is the main international organisation of ski sports. ... The IPC Disabled Alpine Skiing World Cup is an annual circuit of elite disabled alpine skiing competitions, regulated by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and the International Ski Federation (FIS). ... The Disabled Alpine Skiing World Championships, along with the Winter Paralympic Games, are the most prestigious level of international competition in disabled ski racing. ... Silver 2004 The Paralympic Games are a multi-sport event for athletes with physical, mental and sensorial disabilities. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Former crewmembers of the battleship Missouri pose for photos shortly after the Anniversary of the End of World War II ceremony, held aboard the famous ship. ...


Ski videos and movies

Skiing and snowboarding video and movies as a genre, emerged with such classics as Otto Lang (film producer) Ski Flight, Warren Miller, Dirk Collins, and XCZONE.TV leading Nordic Skiing Producers. Skiing has been recorded on film since at least the 1910s, but did not work its way into Hollywood features until the 1930s, when it began to be popular as a leisure activity in the United States. ... Otto Lang (January 21, 1908 – January 30, 2006) was the founder of ski schools on Mt. ... Warren Miller is an acclaimed filmmaker, entrepreneur, and author. ...


Related sports

Grass skiing was started in the mid-1980s as a method for training for alpine skiing. ... Snowboarder in a half-pipe Snowboarder riding off cornice Snowboarding contributes greatly to the economies of ski resorts Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a snow-covered slope on a snowboard that is attached to ones feet using a boot/binding interface. ... For other uses, see Snowshoe (disambiguation). ... // Water skiing began in 1922 when Ralph Samuelson strapped two boards to his feet and rigged a clothesline up to his boat on Lake Pepin in Lake City, Minnesota. ... A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter. ...

References

  1. ^ Kevin Crossley-Holland, The Norse Myths. Pantheon Books, New York. 1980. Page 195
  2. ^ Taylor, Derek. Xspeak: Skiing. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  • "Clip on Skis, Hitch Rover, and Go".  The New York Times, January 5, 2006
  • "Skiing Up the Slopes, Powered by the Wind".  The New York Times, January 6, 2006

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

List of skiing topics This list covers various topics related to skiing Terrain park feature for the daring // Alpine skiing (also known as downhill skiing) Disabled alpine skiing Extreme skiing Freeskiing Freestyle skiing Heliskiing Newschool skiing Speed skiing Snowkiting Ski mountaineering Alpine touring(Randonée) Monoskiing Skwal Snowboarding Cross-country skiing Backcountry skiing Biathlon...


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Skiing
  • U.S. Ski Team Bios and information about American elite skiers
  • Sports: Winter Sports: Skiing Directory of skiing related links
  • National Ski Patrol
  • Working in Ski Resorts Information on working in Ski Resorts
  • Ski tips Tips for getting in shape and improving your skiing

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ski Holidays & Skiing Holidays with Igluski.com (399 words)
Ski holidays and ski chalets to France, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, USA and Canada.
Our ski accommodation includes hotels, apartments and ski chalets, including popular French chalets and cheap ski chalets to a wide range of ski resorts.
We offer ski holidays to France, including all the top French ski resorts, skiing in Austria, Italy, Switzerland, and Andorra, plus skiing in North America in the USA and Canada.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m