FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Skagerrak" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Skagerrak

The Skagerrak strait runs between Norway and the southwest coast of Sweden and the Jutland peninsula of Denmark, connecting the North Sea and the Kattegat strait, which leads to the Baltic Sea. Map of North Sea, from the US Department of Energy: http://eia. ... Simplified diagram A strait is a narrow channel of water that connects two larger bodies of water, and thus lies between two land masses. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is a peninsula in northern Europe that forms the only non-insular part of Denmark and also the northernmost part of Germany, dividing the North Sea from the Baltic Sea. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... The Baltic Sea The Kattegat (Danish), or Kattegatt (Swedish), is a bay of the North Sea and a continuation of the Skagerrak, bounded by Denmark and Sweden. ... Map of the Baltic Sea. ...

Contents


Name

Skagerrak is an assimilation of Skagen-rak, named after Skagen, the northernmost tip of Jutland. There is no evidence of the name in ancient sources. Assimilation, from Latin assimilatio meaning to render similar, is used to describe various phenomena: schema (psychology), the process of assimilating new ideas into a schema (cognitive structure). ... The sand-engulfed Buried Church (tilsandede kirke) at Skagen. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is a peninsula in northern Europe that forms the only non-insular part of Denmark and also the northernmost part of Germany, dividing the North Sea from the Baltic Sea. ...


Rak is identical to Swedish rak (pronounced rawk), "straight"; i.e., Skagerrak is a stretch of straight sailing in the vicinity of Skagen. The ultimate source is the Proto-Indo-European root *reg-, "straight". If the Danish word rak ("rabble, riff-raff") is used, Skagerrak could be interpreted as "the harasser of Skagen", referring to the changeable maritime weather conditions. The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, believed to have been spoken around 4000 BC in Central Asia (according to the Kurgan hypothesis) or millennia before that in Anatolia (according to the Anatolian hypothesis). ...


Kattegat is ancient, preceding the north Germanic languages as the source of Latin Codanus, which appears to have meant the combined waterways of Skagerrak and Kattegat. Kattegat, however, is obscene and therefore taboo in polite society. Skagerrak must be a substitution at some time after the dissimilation of north Germanic. The Baltic Sea The Kattegat (Danish), or Kattegatt (Swedish), is a bay of the North Sea and a continuation of the Skagerrak, bounded by Denmark and Sweden. ... A North Germanic language is any of several Germanic languages spoken in Scandinavia, parts of Finland and on the islands west of Scandinavia. ...


Geography

Straight sailing, middle of Skagerrak
Enlarge
Straight sailing, middle of Skagerrak

The Skagerrak is roughly triangular in shape, measuring 240 km in length, and between 80 and 140 km in width. It deepens toward the Norwegian coast, reaching over 700 metres at the Norwegian Trench. Some ports along the Skagerrak are Oslo and Kristiansand in Norway and Uddevalla and Strömstad in Sweden. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 119 KB) Skagerrak - 2005, April 13 © 2005 by Tomasz Sienicki, tsca#sdf. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 119 KB) Skagerrak - 2005, April 13 © 2005 by Tomasz Sienicki, tsca#sdf. ... Map of the North Sea with Norwegian trench The Norwegian trench (Norwegian: Norskerenna Danish: Norskerenden) is an oceanic trench off the southern coast of Norway. ... County Oslo NO-03 District Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² {{{arealand}}} km² 0. ... County Vest-Agder District Sørlandet Municipality NO-1001 Administrative centre Kristiansand Mayor (2004) Jan Oddvar Skisland (KrF) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 287 277 km² 259 km² 0. ... Uddevalla is a city in Bohus County in western Sweden. ... Strömstad is a Municipality in Västra Götaland County, in western Sweden. ...


The Skagerrak has a salinity of 30 practical salinity units. The volume available to biomass is about 3600 km², including a wide variety of habitats from the sandbanks to Sweden and Denmark to the deeps of the Norwegian trench. Salinity is the saltiness or dissolved salt content of a body of water. ...


Biology

The Skagerrak provides a habitat for approximately 2000 marine species, many of them adapted to its waters. For example, a variety of Atlantic cod called the Skagerrak cod spawns off the Norwegian coast. The eggs are buoyant and the hatchlings feed on zooplankton. Juveniles sink to the bottom where they have a shorter maturity cycle (2 years). They do not migrate but remain local to Norwegian fjords. Binomial name Gadus morhua Linnaeus, 1758 The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a well-known food fish belonging to the family Gadidae. ... Photomontage of plankton organisms Plankton is the aggregate community of weakly swimming but mostly drifting small organisms that inhabit the water column of the ocean, seas, and bodies of freshwater. ... Fjord in Sunnmøre, Norway A fjord (or fiord) is a narrow inlet of the sea between cliffs or steep slopes, which results from marine inundation of a glaciated valley. ...


The variety of habitats and the large volume of plankton on the surface support a prolific marine life. Energy moves from the top to the bottom according to Vinogradov's ladder of migrations; that is, some species are benthic and others pelagic but there are graded layers in which species move vertically for short distances. In addition, some species are benthopelagic, moving between surface and bottom. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ivan Matveevich Vinogradov (September 14, 1891–March 20, 1983) was a Russian mathematician, who was one of the creators of modern analytic number theory, and also the dominant figure in mathematics in the USSR. He was born in the Velikiye Luki district, Pskov Oblast. ... In marine geology and biology, benthos are the organisms and habitats of the sea floor; in freshwater biology they are the organisms and habitats of the bottoms of lakes, rivers, and creeks. ... The pelagic zone is the part of the open sea or ocean comprising the water column, i. ... Diagram of the layers of the pelagic zone. ...


The benthic species include Coryphaenoides rupestris, Argentina silus, Etmopterus spinax, Chimaera monstrosa and Glyptocephalus cynoglossus. On the top are Clupea harengus, Scomber scombrus, Sprattus sprattus. Some species that move between are Pandalus borealis, Sabinea sarsi, Etmopterus spinax. Binomial name Argentina silus (Ascanius, 1775) The greater argentine (Argentina silus) or Atlantic argentine is a northern Atlantic smelt in the family Argentinidae, or herring-smelts. ... Atlantic herring Clupea harengus is the most abundant fish species of the world, living in large schools (swarm). ... Binomial name Scomber scombrus Linnaeus, 1758 The Atlantic mackerel, Scomber scombrus, is a pelagic schooling species of mackerel found on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean. ... Binomial name Sprattus sprattus (Linnaeus, 1758) The European sprat is a small, herring-like, marine fish. ... Binomial name Pandalus borealis Krøyer, 1838 Pandalus borealis (also called Pandalus eous) is a species of shrimp found in cold parts of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. ...

History

In both world wars, the Skagerrak was strategically very important for Germany. One of the biggest sea battles of World War I, the Battle of Jutland, also known as the Battle of the Skagerrak, took place there May 31 to June 1, 1916. The importance of controlling this waterway, the only access to the Baltic, provided the motivation for the German invasion of Denmark and Norway during World War II. Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russian Empire United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Ferdinand Foch Nicholas II Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Reinhard Scheer Franz Josef I Oskar Potiorek Ä°smail Enver Ferdinand I Casualties Military dead: 5,520... Combatants United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland German Empire Commanders Sir John Jellicoe, Sir David Beatty Reinhard Scheer, Franz von Hipper Strength 28 battleships, 9 battlecruisers, 8 armoured cruisers, 26 light cruisers, 78 destroyers 16 battleships, 5 battlecruisers, 6 pre-dreadnoughts, 11 light cruisers, 61 torpedo-boats Casualties 6... May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the use of images on this page may require cleanup, involving adjustment of image placement, formatting, size, or other adjustments. ...

Battle of Jutland
Battle of Jutland

Download high resolution version (999x287, 93 KB)The Battle of Jutland from the deck of a British ship, with shell-splashes in the water. ... Download high resolution version (999x287, 93 KB)The Battle of Jutland from the deck of a British ship, with shell-splashes in the water. ...

External links

  • Skagerrak Deep-water Fish Assemblage

  Results from FactBites:
 
Skagerrak - encyclopedia article about Skagerrak. (1331 words)
The Skagerrak strait A strait is a narrow channel of water that connects two larger bodies of water, and thus lies between two land masses.
It is bordered by Norway on the west, Finland on the northeast, the Skagerrak Strait and the Kattegat Strait on the southwest, and the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia on the east.
In both world wars, the Skagerrak was strategically very important for Germany Germany or the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Deutschland or Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is one of the world's leading industrialised countries, located in the heart of Europe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m