FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Sixties" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sixties
Millennia:
1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium
Centuries:
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades:
1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s
Years:

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (1st millennium BC – 1st millennium – 2nd millennium – other millennia) Events Beginning of Christianity (30s) and Islam (7th century) London founded by Romans as Londinium Diaspora of the Jews The Olympic Games observed until 393 The Library of Alexandria, largest library in the world, burned Rise and fall of the Roman... // Events The Black Death Mongol Empires in Asia The Renaissance in Europe The Protestant Reformation The agricultural and industrial revolutions The rise of nationalism and the nation state European discovery of the Americas and Australia and their colonization European colonization and decolonization in Africa and Asia Population explosion World-spanning... (2nd millennium – 3rd millennium – 4th millennium – other millennia) The third millennium is the third period of one thousand years in the Common Era. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... // Events and trends The 1930s were spent struggling for a solution to the global depression. ... // Events and trends The 1940s were dominated by World War II, the most destructive armed conflict in history. ... // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the height of the baby-boom from returning... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 60s and 70s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ...

The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. The Sixties has come to refer to the complex of inter-related cultural and political events which occurred in approximately that period, in western countries, particularly Britain, France, the United States and West Germany. Social upheaval was not limited to just these nations, reaching large scale in nations such as Japan and Mexico as well. The term is used both nostalgically by those who participated in those events, and pejoratively by those who regard the time as a period whose harmful effects are still being felt today. 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ...


Popular memory has conflated into the Sixties some events which did not actually occur during the period. For example, although some of the most dramatic events of the American civil rights movement occurred in the early 1960s, the movement had already began in earnest during the 1950s. On the other hand, the rise of feminism and gay rights began only in the very late 1960s and did not fully flower until the Seventies. However, the "Sixties" has become synonymous with all the new, exciting, radical, subversive and/or dangerous (according to one's viewpoint) events and trends of the period. The Civil Rights Movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to primarily African American citizens of United States. ... Feminism is a diverse collection of social theories, political movements, and moral philosophies, largely motivated by or concerning the experiences of women, especially in terms of their social, political, and economic situation. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... This article deals with the cultural and social aspects and trends of the 1970s. ... Synonyms (in ancient Greek syn συν = plus and onoma όνομα = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ...

Contents


Events and trends

Many of the trends of the 1960s were due to the demographic changes brought about by the baby boom generation, the height of the Cold War, and the dissolution of European colonial empires. The rise in social revolution, civil rights movements, human rights movement, anti-War movements, and the Counterculture movement are only some of the characteristics that defined the 1960s. Many experts attribute the 1960s "counter-culture revolution" as being the result of the major social and political factors that rose in the 1950s like brinksmanship, continued fighting in the 3rd world, and a return to pre-WWII lifestyle. The new generation was determined to reject a pre-WWII conformist lifestyle with men in suits and women in the kitchen. While many believed it to be just a "Western" phenomenon, the '60s revolution spread far beyond the borders of America and Western Europe. In South America, revolutions were at a height, in the Eastern Bloc, movements were made inspired by the Hungarian Revolution to reject Soviet domination, and in the Middle East attempted to resist Soviet and American domination (see Non-Aligned Movement). Overall, the '60s affected almost the entire globe. A demographic or demographic profile is a term used in marketing and broadcasting, to describe a demographic grouping or a market segment. ... A US postage stamp depicting the increase in birth rate that country experienced after World War II. As is often the case with a large war, the elation of victory and large numbers of returning males to their country triggered a baby boom after the end of World War II... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms are at odds with those of the social mainstream, a cultural equivalent of a political opposition. ... During the Cold War,the Eastern Bloc (or Soviet Bloc) comprised the following Central and Eastern European countries: Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, East Germany, Poland, Albania (until the early 1960s, see below), the Soviet Union, and Czechoslovakia. ... The Non-Aligned Movement, or NAM, is an international organization of over 100 states which consider themselves not formally aligned with or against any major power bloc. ...


Technology

Buzz Aldrin on the Moon
Buzz Aldrin on the Moon

Download high resolution version (904x913, 248 KB)Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin near a leg of the Lunar Module. ... Download high resolution version (904x913, 248 KB)Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin near a leg of the Lunar Module. ... Buzz in the LM Colonel Edwin Eugene Buzz Aldrin, Jr. ... typical Audio Cassette - File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... typical Audio Cassette - File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Typical audio Compact Cassette. ... Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (Russian: Юрий Алексеевич Гагарин; YOO-ree a-lek-SE-ye-veech ga-GA-reen; March 9, 1934 – March 27, 1968), was a Soviet cosmonaut who in 1961 became the first human to travel into space. ... Valentina Tereshkova Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova (Russian: ; born March 6, 1937), Soviet cosmonaut, flew on Vostok 6 in 1963 to become the first woman in space. ... Outer space (also called just space) as a name for a region, refers to the relatively empty parts of the Universe, outside the atmospheres of celestial bodies. ... Earth, also known as the Earth, Terra, and (mostly in the 19th century) Tellus, is the third-closest planet to the Sun. ... Crust composition Oxygen 43% Silicon 21% Aluminium 10% Calcium 9% Iron 9% Magnesium 5% Titanium 2% Nickel 0. ... The Apollo 11 mission was the first manned lunar landing. ... A geosynchronous satellite is a satellite whose orbital speed equals the Earths rotational speed. ... In computer science, algorithmic information theory is a field of study which attempts to define the complexity (aka descriptive complexity, Kolmogorov complexity, Kolmogorov-Chaitin complexity, or algorithmic entropy) of a string as the length of the shortest binary program which outputs that string. ... ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated as DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... A Request for Comments (RFC) document is one of a series of numbered Internet informational documents and standards very widely followed by both commercial software and freeware in the Internet and Unix communities. ... Farrington Daniels (1889-1972) is considered one of the pioneers of the modern direct use of solar energy. ... Typical audio Compact Cassette. ... A Sony TC-630 reel-to-reel recorder, once a common household object. ...

Science

Plate tectonics (from the Greek word for one who constructs, τεκτων, tekton) is a theory of geology developed to explain the phenomenon of continental drift, and is currently the theory accepted by the vast majority of scientists working in this area. ... Portrayal of shifting continents The concept of continental drift was first proposed by Alfred Wegener. ... Jacques Lucien Monod (February 9, 1910 - May 31, 1976) was a biologist and a Nobel Prize Winner in Physiology or Medicine in 1965. ... François Jacob (born June 17, 1920) is a French biologist, who together with Jacques Monod, originated the idea that control of enzyme levels in all cells happens through feedback on transcription. ... The lac operon is a DNA sequence that governs the production of three proteins, including two enzymes for transporting and metabolizing lactose in the bacterium Escherichia coli (). In the absence of lactose, the lac represor protein binds to the operator (a part of the DNA sequence), inhibiting the production of... (Ecology is sometimes used incorrectly as a synonym for the natural environment. ... The intelligentsia is a social class of intellectuals and social groups close to them (e. ...

War, peace and politics

Image File history File links Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. ... Image File history File links Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Image File history File links The Berlin Wall near Potsdamer Platz Photo taken 7 June 2003 by djmutex yozah!!!!!!!!!!!!! File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links The Berlin Wall near Potsdamer Platz Photo taken 7 June 2003 by djmutex yozah!!!!!!!!!!!!! File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Berlin Wall on November 16, 1989 The Berlin Wall (German: Die Berliner Mauer) was a long barrier separating West Berlin from East Berlin and the surrounding territory of East Germany. ... A poster during the Cultural Revolution The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (Simplified Chinese: 无产阶级文化大革命; Traditional Chinese: 無產階級文化大革命; pinyin: ; literally Proletarian Cultural Great Revolution; often abbreviated to 文化大革命 wén huà dà gé mìng, literally Great Cultural Revolution, or simply 文革 wén gé, literally Cultural Revolution) in the Peoples Republic of China... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... The Nigerian Civil War, 1967 – 1970, was an ethnic and political conflict caused by the attempted secession of the South-eastern provinces of Nigeria as the self-proclaimed republic of Biafra. ... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... Berlin Wall on November 16, 1989 The Berlin Wall (German: Die Berliner Mauer) was a long barrier separating West Berlin from East Berlin and the surrounding territory of East Germany. ... 1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Cuban poster warning before invasion The Bay of Pigs Invasion (also known in Cuba as the raping of your mother, after a beach in the Bay of Pigs where the landing took place) was a United States-planned and funded landing by armed Cuban exiles in Central Cuba in an... 1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The color red and particularly the red flag are traditional symbols of Socialism. ... Cuban President Fidel Castro. ... Civil Rights Movement in the United States, political, legal, and social struggle to gain full citizenship rights for African American and to achieve racial equality. ... It has been suggested that Apartheid outside South Africa be merged into this article or section. ... Disenfranchising refers to the removal of the ability to vote from a person or group of people. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans, Black Americans, or simply blacks are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to West and Central Africa. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... This article refers to the largest city of Michigan. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Glenville is the name of several places in the United States of America: Glenville, Alabama Glenville, Arkansas Glenville, Connecticut Glenville, Delaware Glenville, Kansas Glenville, Kentucky Glenville, Maryland Glenville, Minnesota Glenville, Mississippi Glenville, Nebraska Glenville, New York (two places): in Schenectady County in Westchester County Glenville, North Carolina Glenville, Pennsylvania Glenville... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Cuban Missile Crisis was a tense confrontation between the Soviet Union and the United States over the Soviet deployment of nuclear missiles in Cuba. ... 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The 1965 war between India and Pakistan, also known as the Second Kashmir War, was the culmination of a series of skirmishes that occurred between April 1965 and September 1965. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the National Liberation Front (NLF, or Viet Cong) against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and their allies—notably the United States military in support of... Mary Ann Vecchio kneels over the body of Jeffrey Miller The Kent State shootings occurred at Kent State University, Ohio, and involved the shooting of students by the National Guard on May 4, 1970. ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Czechoslovaks in a café watch Soviet tanks roll past The Prague Spring (Czech: Pražské jaro) was a period of political liberalization in Czechoslovakia starting January 5, 1968, and running until August 20 of that year when the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies (except for Romania) invaded the... The Stonewall riots were a series of violent conflicts between homosexuals and police officers in New York City. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 member states, which includes virtually all internationally recognized independent countries. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... The New Left is a term used in political discourse to refer to radical left-wing movements from the 1960s onwards. ... Jean Lesage, Daniel Johnson Sr. ... Beginning in 1963, a terrorist group that became known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks on government offices and at least two murders by FLQ gunfire and three violent deaths by bombings. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Feminism is a diverse collection of social theories, political movements, and moral philosophies, largely motivated by or concerning the experiences of women, especially in terms of their social, political, and economic situation. ...

Economics

The West can refer to : The U.S. West or the American West The Western world, or Western Civilization. ... Accumulated GDP growth for various countries. ...

Culture

Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Beatles were a British pop and rock group from Liverpool. ... Elvis is still alive, and stays in his secret room, with a sex machine. ... Portrait photograph of Bob Dylan taken by Daniel Kramer Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24, 1941) is a highly influential American songwriter, musician, and poet. ... Joan Baezs 1975 bestseller Diamonds & Rust. ... A movie poster from the original release of 2001 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) is an immensely popular and influential science fiction film and book; the film directed by Stanley Kubrick and the book written by Arthur C. Clarke. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Main article: History of Doctor Who Doctor Who first appeared on BBC television on November 23, 1963. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Star Trek collectively refers to six science fiction television series spanning 726 episodes, ten motion pictures, and hundreds of novels, video games, and other works of fiction, all set within the same fictional universe created by Gene Roddenberry in the early- to mid-1960s. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... James Bond is best known from the EON Productions film series. ... 2002 reissue of the original novel. ... 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sean Connery Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930 in Edinburgh, Scotland) better known simply as Sean Connery, is a Scottish actor who has starred in many films and is best known as the original cinematic James Bond. ... Flower-Power Bus Hippie (or sometimes hippy) is a term originally used to describe some of the rebellious youth of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Drug subcultures are examples of countercultures, primarily defined by recreational drug use. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Woodstock redirects here. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... From The Essential Alan Watts Alan Wilson Watts (January 6, 1915 – November 16, 1973) was a philosopher, writer, speaker, and expert in comparative religion. ... Atheism is characterized by an absence of belief in the existence of gods. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The Fourth Great Awakening is a religious awakening that some scholars believe took place in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... The Consciousness Revolution was a period of spiritual awakening in American history, according to Strauss and Howe in their books Generations and Fourth Turning. ... Downtown Seattle skyline City nickname: The Emerald City Location Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Government County King Mayor Greg Nickels NP/Democrat ¹ Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 369. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... City motto: Concordia Salus (Latin: Well-being through harmony) Province Quebec Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area  - % water 500. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Downtown San Antonio as viewed from the Tower of the Americas Nickname: Alamo City Location in Texas Founded  -Incorporated 1731 {{{incorporated}}}  County Bexar County Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - Total  - Water 1,067. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Progressive rock (shortened to prog, or prog rock when differentiating from other progressive genres) is an ambitious, eclectic, and often grandiose style of rock music which arose in the late 1960s, reached the peak of its popularity in the early 1970s, and continues as a musical form to this day. ... Resources ArtLex. ... Pop art was an artistic movement that emerged in the late 1950s in England and the United States. ... Conceptual art, sometimes called idea art, is art in which the ideas embodied by a piece are more central to the work than the means used to create it. ...

Others

Post-colonialism (also known as post-colonial theory, or post-oriental theory) refers to a set of theories in continental philosophy and literature that grapple with the legacy of 19th century British and French colonial rule. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous after Asia. ... World map showing location of Asia Asia is the central and eastern part of Eurasia, defined by subtracting Europe from Eurasia. ... JFK redirects here. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... . Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968) was one of two younger brothers of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Charles Manson Charles Milles Manson (born November 12, 1934) was convicted of murder in what became known as the Tate-La Bianca case, named after Sharon Tate and Leno and Rosemary LaBianca —victims in two separate mass murders carried out by Mansons followers. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Malcolm X Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 – also: Malcolm Little, Detroit Red, El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, and Omowale) was an American spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the thirty-sixth President of the United States (1963–1969). ... The Great Society was a set of domestic programs enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... The Watts Riots was a large-scale civil disorder lasting six days in Los Angeles, California in 1965. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Chicago, colloquially known as the Second City and the Windy City, is the third-largest city in population in the United States and the largest inland city in the country. ... Police and protesters at the Convention The 1968 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago by the United States Democratic Party, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. Presidential Election. ... A US postage stamp depicting the increase in birth rate that country experienced after World War II. As is often the case with a large war, the elation of victory and large numbers of returning males to their country triggered a baby boom after the end of World War II... Birth control is a regimen of one or more extra actions, devices, or medications followed in order to deliberately prevent or reduce the likelihood of a woman becoming pregnant. ... The sexual revolution was a substantial change in sexual morality and sexual behavior throughout the West in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Red = drive on right Blue = drive on left Rules of the road are the general practices and procedures followed by people on roads, especially those driving cars or on bicycles or other vehicles. ...

Big changes during the Sixties

In the United States

The movement for civil and political rights for African Americans (in the early '60s usually called Negroes and in the later '60s Blacks), initially a non-violent movement led by Martin Luther King, Jr. and other Gandhian figures but later producing radical offshoots such as the Black Power movement and competing with the Black Panther Party and the Black Muslims for primacy in the African-American community. African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी), called Mahatma Gandhi, was the charismatic leader who brought the cause of Indias independence from British colonial rule to world attention. ... Black Power is a slogan which describes the aspiration of many people of varying degrees of African descent for national self-determination. ... Logo of the Black Panther Party The Black Panther Party (originally called the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) revolutionary, Black nationalist organization in the United States that formed in the late 1960s and grew to national prominence before falling apart due to a combination of internal problems and suppression... The Nation of Islam (NOI), also known as the Black Muslim Movement (although the term is discouraged by the NOI), is a spiritual and political black separatist movement founded in America in 1930 by Wallace Fard Muhammad (1877- ?). The Nation of Islam has a somewhat tenuous connection to mainstream Islam...


The beginning of what was generally seen as a new political era with the election of President John F. Kennedy in 1960, and its ending in tragedy and disillusionment with Kennedy's assassination in 1963, the assassinations of King and Robert F. Kennedy in 1968, and the collapse of Lyndon Johnson's presidency. JFK redirects here. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... . Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968) was one of two younger brothers of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ...


The rise of a mass movement in opposition to the Vietnam War, culminating in the massive Moratorium protests in 1969, and also the movement of resistance to conscription (“the Draft”) for the war. The antiwar movement was initially based on the older 1950s "Peace movement" controlled by the Communist Party USA, but by the mid '60s it outgrew this and became a broad-based mass movement centred on the universities and churches. The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the National Liberation Front (NLF, or Viet Cong) against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and their allies—notably the United States military in support of... In law, a moratorium (from Latin morari, to delay) is a legal authorization postponing for a specified time the payment of debts or obligations. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... The global peace movement refers to a sense of common purpose among organizations that seek to end wars and minimize inter-human violence, usually through pacifism, non-violent resistance, diplomacy, boycott, moral purchasing and demonstrating. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is one of several Marxist-Leninist groups in the United States. ...


Stimulated by this movement, but growing beyond it, the radicalization of large numbers of student-age youth, beginning with the Free Speech Movement at the University of California, Berkeley in 1964, peaking in the riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois and reaching a tragic climax with the shootings at Kent State University in 1970. The Free Speech Movement was a student protest which began on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley in 1964 under the informal leadership of student Mario Savio and others. ... University of California, Berkeley The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, University of California, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a public coeducational university situated in Berkeley, California, USA to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Police and protesters at the Convention The 1968 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago by the United States Democratic Party, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. Presidential Election. ... Chicago, colloquially known as the Second City and the Windy City, is the third-largest city in population in the United States and the largest inland city in the country. ... Mary Ann Vecchio kneels over the body of Jeffrey Miller The Kent State shootings, also known as May 4th or The Kent State Massacre, occurred at Kent State University in the city of Kent, Ohio, and involved the shooting of students by the Ohio National Guard on Monday, May 4... Kent State University (KSU) is an institution of higher learning located in Kent, Ohio, which is about 40 miles southeast of Cleveland, and 12 miles from Akron, Ohio. ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


The rapid rise of a "New Left," employing the rhetoric of Marxism but having little organizational connection with older Marxist organizations such the Communist Party, and even less connection with the supposed focus of Marxist politics, the organized labor movement, and consisting of ephemeral campus-based Trotskyist, Maoist and anarchist groups, some of which by the end of the 1960s had turned to terrorism. The New Left is a term used in political discourse to refer to radical left-wing movements from the 1960s onwards. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century German philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is one of several Marxist-Leninist groups in the United States. ... Trotskyism is the theory of Marxism as advocated by Leon Trotsky. ... Maoism or Mao Tse-tung Thought (Chinese: 毛泽东思想, pinyin: Máo Zédōng Sīxiǎng), is a variant of Marxism-Leninism derived from the teachings of Mao Zedong (1893–1976). ... Anarchism is a range of political views whose name is derived from the Latin word anarchia which was first employed in translating Aristotles Greek term αναρχία the privative prefix αν an- without is combined with αρχία arkhê — meaning command or rule). Thus anarchism, in the most generally understood sense of the term... Terror attack in Jerusalem The word terrorism is controversial, with no universally agreed definition. ...

Rioting at the Democratic Convention in Chicago, 1968
Rioting at the Democratic Convention in Chicago, 1968

The overlapping, but somewhat different, movement of youth cultural radicalism manifested by the hippies and the counter-culture, whose emblematic moments were the Summer of Love in San Francisco in 1967 and the Woodstock Festival in 1969. Chicago This work is copyrighted. ... Hippies (singular hippie or sometimes hippy) were members of the 1960s counterculture movement who adopted a communal or nomadic lifestyle, renounced corporate nationalism and the Vietnam War, embraced aspects of Buddhism, Hinduism, and/or Native American religious culture, and were otherwise at odds with traditional middle class Western values. ... During the 1960s the term underground acquired a new meaning in that it referred to members of the so-called counterculture, i. ... The Summer of Love was a phrase given to the summer of 1967 to try to describe (personify) the feeling of being in San Francisco that summer, when the so-called hippie movement came to full fruition. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Woodstock redirects here. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ...


The rapid spread, associated with this movement, of the recreational use of cannabis and other drugs, particularly new synthetic psychedelic drugs such as LSD. Species Cannabis indica Cannabis ruderalis Cannabis sativa Cannabis is a genus of flowering plant that includes one or more species. ... The word psychedelic is a neologism coined from the Greek words for mind, ψυχη (psyche), and manifest, δηλειν (delein). ... D-lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called acid, LSD, or LSD-25, is a powerful semisynthetic psychedelic drug. ...


The breakdown among young people of conventional sexual morality and the flourishing of the sexual revolution. Initially geared mostly to heterosexual male gratification, it soon gave rise to contrary trends, Women's Liberation and Gay Liberation. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The sexual revolution was a substantial change in sexual morality and sexual behavior throughout the West in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ...


The rise of an alternative culture among affluent youth, creating a huge market for rock and blues music produced by drug-culture influenced bands such as The Beatles, Jefferson Airplane and The Doors, and also for radical music in the folk tradition pioneered by Bob Dylan. Alternative culture is a catch-all phrase used to describe a variety of separate loosely related or completely unrelated cultures and sub-cultures that are outside of the mainstream culture or are perceived as being such. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... For other uses, see blues (disambiguation) Blues is a vocal and instrumental music form which emerged in the African-American community of the United States. ... The Beatles were a British pop and rock group from Liverpool. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the LSD-influenced psychedelic rock movement. ... The Doors, Legacy (Clockwise from top right): Jim Morrison, John Densmore, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek The Doors (formed in 1965 in Los Angeles, California) were a popular and influential American rock band. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Portrait photograph of Bob Dylan taken by Daniel Kramer Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24, 1941) is a highly influential American songwriter, musician, and poet. ...


In other Western countries

The peak of the student and New Left protests in 1968 coincided with political upheavals in a number of other countries. Although these events often sprang from completely different causes, they were influenced by reports and images of what was happening in the United States and France. Students in Mexico City, for example, protested against the corrupt regime of Gustavo Díaz Ordaz: in the resulting Tlatelolco massacre hundreds were killed. 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides... Term of office: 1 December 1964 – 1 December 1970 Preceded by: Adolfo López Mateos Succeeded by: Luis Echeverría Álvarez Date of birth: 12 March 1911 Place of birth: Cd. ... The Tlatelolco massacre took place on the night of October 2, 1968, in the Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco, Mexico City. ...


The influence of American culture and politics in Western Europe, Japan and Australia was already so great by the early 1960s that most of the trends described above soon spawned counterparts in most Western countries. University students rioted in London, Paris, Berlin and Rome, huge crowds protested against the Vietnam War in Australia and New Zealand (both of which had committed troops to the war), and politicians such as Harold Wilson and Pierre Trudeau modelled themselves on John F. Kennedy. The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... This article is about the British politician. ... The Right Honourable Joseph Philippe Pierre Yves Elliott Trudeau, PC , CC , CH , QC , MA , LL.L , LL.D , FRSC (October 18, 1919 – September 28, 2000) was the fifteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 20, 1968 to June 3, 1979, and from March 3, 1980 to June 30, 1984. ...


An important difference between the United States and Western Europe, however, was the existence of a mass socialist and/or Communist movement in most European countries (particularly France and Italy), with which the student-based new left was able to forge a connection. The most spectacular manifestation of this was the May 1968 student revolt in Paris, which linked up with a general strike called by the Communist-controlled trade unions and for a few days seemed capable of overthrowing the government of Charles de Gaulle. May 1968 poster: Be young and shut up. The shadow is a caricature of General De Gaulle. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... General Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (   listen?) (November 22, 1890 – November 9, 1970), in France commonly referred to as le général de Gaulle, was a French military leader and statesman. ...


In non-Western countries

In Eastern Europe, students also drew inspiration from the protests in the west. In Poland and Yugoslavia they protested against restrictions on free speech by Communist regimes. In Czechoslovakia, 1968 was the year of Alexander Dubček’s Prague Spring, a source of inspiration to many Western leftists who admired Dubček's "socialism with a human face." The Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in August ended these hopes, and also fatally damaged the chances of the orthodox Communist Parties drawing many recruits from the student protest movement. The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was the Yugoslav state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Alexander Dubček Alexander Dubček (November 27, 1921 – November 7, 1992) was a Slovak politician and briefly leader of Czechoslovakia (1968-1969). ... Czechoslovaks in a café watch Soviet tanks roll past The Prague Spring (Czech: Pražské jaro) was a period of political liberalization in Czechoslovakia starting January 5, 1968, and running until August 20 of that year when the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies (except for Romania) invaded the... Map of Warsaw Pact member countries. ...


In the People's Republic of China the mid 1960s were also a time of massive upheaval, and the Red Guard rampages of Mao Zedong's Cultural Revolution had some superficial resemblances to the student protests in the West. The Maoist groups that briefly flourished in the West in this period saw in Chinese Communism a more revolutionary, less bureaucratic model of socialism. Most of them were rapidly disillusioned when Mao welcomed Richard Nixon to China in 1972. People in China, however, saw the Nixon visit as a victory in that they believed the United States would concede that Mao Zedong thought was superior to capitalism (this was the Party stance on the visit in late 1971 and early 1972). The Cuban revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara also became an iconic figure for the student left, although he was in fact an orthodox Communist. In the Peoples Republic of China, the Red Guards (紅衛兵) were civilians who were the frontline implementers of the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1960s-1970s). ...   Mao Zedong? (December 26, 1893 – September 9, 1976; Mao Tse-tung in Wade-Giles) was the chairman of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China from 1943 and the chairman of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China from 1945 until his death. ... A poster during the Cultural Revolution The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (Simplified Chinese: 无产阶级文化大革命; Traditional Chinese: 無產階級文化大革命; pinyin: ; literally Proletarian Cultural Great Revolution; often abbreviated to 文化大革命 wén huà dà gé mìng, literally Great Cultural Revolution, or simply 文革 wén gé, literally Cultural Revolution) in the Peoples Republic of China... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the thirty-seventh President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... Che Guevara (Havana - March 5, 1960) Dr. Ernesto Rafael Guevara de la Serna (June 14, 1928 – October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara or el Che, was an Argentine-born Marxist revolutionary and Cuban guerrilla leader. ...


People

World leaders

Mao Zedongs photograph File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Mao Zedongs photograph File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...   Mao Zedong? (December 26, 1893 – September 9, 1976; Mao Tse-tung in Wade-Giles) was the chairman of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China from 1943 and the chairman of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China from 1945 until his death. ... A poster during the Cultural Revolution The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (Simplified Chinese: 无产阶级文化大革命; Traditional Chinese: 無產階級文化大革命; pinyin: ; literally Proletarian Cultural Great Revolution; often abbreviated to 文化大革命 wén huà dà gé mìng, literally Great Cultural Revolution, or simply 文革 wén gé, literally Cultural Revolution) in the Peoples Republic of China... Rt Hon Sir Robert Menzies KT AK CH QC The Right Honourable Sir Robert Gordon Menzies KT, AK, CH, QC (20 December 1894 – 14 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia serving eighteen and a half years. ... Rt Hon Harold Holt Harold Edward Holt (5 August 1908 - 19 December 1967) was an Australian politician and the 17th Prime Minister of Australia from 1966 - 1967, now best remembered for the bizarre circumstances of his death. ... Rt Hon John McEwen Sir John McEwen (March 29, 1900 - November 20, 1980), Australian politician and 18th Prime Minister of Australia, was born at Chiltern, Victoria, where his father was a pharmacist. ... The Right Honourable John George Diefenbaker, PC , LL.B , MA , BA (September 18, 1895 – August 16, 1979) was the thirteenth Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... The Right Honourable Lester Bowles Mike Pearson, PC , CC , OM , OBE , MA , BA , LL.D (April 23, 1897 – December 27, 1972) was a Canadian statesman, diplomat and politician who was made a Nobel Laureate in 1957 and served as the fourteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 22, 1963, to... Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse...   Mao Zedong? (December 26, 1893 – September 9, 1976; Mao Tse-tung in Wade-Giles) was the chairman of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China from 1943 and the chairman of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China from 1945 until his death. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887–April 5, 1975) was a Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... Nasser on Time magazine, 1958 Gamal Abdel Nasser (Arabic: جمال عبد الناصر) ‎ (January 15, 1918 – September 28, 1970) was the second President of Egypt after Muhammad Naguib and is considered one of the most important Arab leaders in history. ... General Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (   listen?) (November 22, 1890 – November 9, 1970), in France commonly referred to as le général de Gaulle, was a French military leader and statesman. ... Jawaharlal Nehru (जवाहरलाल नेहरू, Javāharlāl NehrÅ«) (November 14, 1889 – May 27, 1964), also called Pandit (Teacher) Nehru, was the leader of the socialist wing of the Indian National Congress during and after Indias struggle for independence from the British Empire. ... Lal Bahadur Shastri (लालबहादुर शास्त्री) (October 2, 1904 - January 11, 1966) was the second Prime Minister of independent Bharat and a significant figure in the struggle for independence. ... Indira Priyadarshini Gandhi (इन्दिरा प्रियदर्शिनी गान्धी) (November 19, 1917 – October 31, 1984) was Prime Minister of India from January 19, 1966 to March 24, 1977, and from January 14, 1980 until her assassination in 1984. ... David Ben-Gurion (October 16, 1886 – December 1, 1973; Hebrew: דָּוִד בֶּן גּוּרִיּוֹן) was the first Prime Minister of Israel. ... Levi Eshkol Shkolnik (Hebrew לֵוִי אֶשְׁכּוֹל שְׁקוֹלְנִיק) (October 25, 1895 - February 26, 1969), was the third Prime Minister of Israel from 1963 until his death of a heart attack in 1969. ... Infamous war criminal Hirohito (April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) was the 124th Emperor of Japan who reigned from 1926 to 1989. ... Pope John XXIII (Latin: ), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (November 25, 1881 – June 3, 1963), reigned as the 261st Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City from October 28, 1958 until his death in 1963. ... Pope Paul VI (Latin: ), born Giovanni Battista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini (September 26, 1897 – August 6, 1978), reigned as Pope and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1963 to 1978. ... Basil Stanlake Brooke, 1st Viscount Brookeborough, KG, CBE, MC (June 9, 1888-August 18, 1973) was an Irish Unionist politician. ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... The Right Honourable Captain Terence ONeill, Baron ONeill of the Maine (September 10, 1914 - June 12, 1990), was the fourth Prime Minister of Northern Ireland. ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... The Right Honourable James Dawson Chichester-Clark, Baron Moyola, PC, DL (February 12, 1923–May 17, 2002) was the fifth Prime Minister of Northern Ireland. ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... Order: 3rd Democratically Elected Governor Term of Office: January 2, 1969–January 2, 1973 Predecessor: Roberto Sánchez Vilella Successor: Rafael Hernández Colón Date of Birth: Saturday, February 17, 1904 Place of Birth: Ponce, Puerto Rico Date of Death: Tuesday, October 21, 2003 Place of Death: San Juan... ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (Irish name Seán Ó Loingsigh) (August 15, 1917-October 20, 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchyov (Khrushchev) (Russian: Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв   listen?, April 17, 1894 â€“ September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union after the death of Joseph Stalin. ... Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev   listen? (Russian: ) (December 19 (O.S. December 6) 1906 – November 10, 1982) was effective ruler of the Soviet Union from 1964 to 1982, though at first in partnership with others. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor, born 21 April 1926), styled Her Majesty The Queen, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent... The Right Honourable Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894–29 December 1986), nicknamed Supermac and Mac the Knife, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... This article is about the British politician. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower, OM, GCB, (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and Supreme Commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... JFK redirects here. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the thirty-seventh President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Konrad Adenauer (January 5, 1876 – April 19, 1967) was a conservative German statesman. ... Ludwig Erhard (February 4, 1897–May 5, 1977) was a German politician (CDU) and Chancellor of Germany from 1963 until 1966. ... Kurt Georg Kiesinger (April 6, 1904–March 9, 1988) was a conservative German politician and Chancellor of Germany from 1 December 1966 until 21 October , 1969. ... Josip Broz Tito   listen? (May 7, 1892 – May 4, 1980) was the leader of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was the Yugoslav state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ...

Writers and intellectuals

James Graham Ballard (born November 15, 1930 in Shanghai) is a British novelist. ... Truman Capote photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Truman Capote (September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984) was an American writer. ... Andy Capp is a long-running comic strip character created by Reg Smythe, seen in the Daily Mirror and Sunday Mirror since August 5, 1957. ... Professor Avram Noam Chomsky, Ph. ... Philip K. Dick Philip Kindred Dick (16 December 1928 — 2 March 1982), often known by his initials PKD, and sometimes by the pen name Richard Phillips, was an American science fiction writer and novelist who changed the genre profoundly. ... Louise Fitzhugh (October 5, 1928 - November 19, 1974) was an American author of Young Adult fiction. ... Milton Friedman Milton Friedman (born July 31, 1912) is a U.S. economist, known primarily for his work on macroeconomics and for his advocacy of laissez-faire capitalism. ... Allen Ginsberg in San Francisco. ... Heinlein autographing at the 1976 Worldcon Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most influential and controversial authors in science fiction. ... Frank Herbert Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Ken Kesey Ken Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, probably best known for his novel One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a cultural icon who some consider a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... Timothy Francis Leary (October 22, 1920 – May 31, 1996) was an American writer, psychologist, campaigner for psychedelic drug research and use, 60s counterculture icon and computer software designer. ... Norman Mailer, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Norman Kingsley Mailer (born January 31, 1923) is an American writer and innovator of the nonfictional novel. ... Herbert Marshall McLuhan (July 21, 1911 – December 31, 1980) was a Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar, professor of English literature, literary critic, and communications theorist, who is one of the founders of the study of media ecology and is today an honorary guru among technophiles. ... A respected astronomer and dogged critic of pseudoscience, Carl Sagan is best known for his enthusiastic efforts at popularizing science. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 - February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Dr. Seuss is the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991). ... John Steinbeck This is a current Biography collaboration of the week! Please help improve it to featured article standard. ... Hunter S. Thompson Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... Gore Vidal, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Eugene Luther Gore Vidal, known better simply as Gore Vidal, (born October 3, 1925) is a well-known American man of letters, a writer of novels, plays and essays, and a public figure for over fifty years. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... From The Essential Alan Watts Alan Wilson Watts (January 6, 1915 – November 16, 1973) was a philosopher, writer, speaker, and expert in comparative religion. ... Tom Wolfe (born March 2, 1931) is an American author and journalist. ...

Sports figures

At the University of Arkansas, six-foot, 180-pound Lance Alworth (born 1940) was a running back who led all colleges in punt return yardage in 1960 and in 1961. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Richard Richie Benaud (born October 6, 1930) is an Australian cricketer and latterly cricket commentator and writer. ... Cricket is a team sport played between two groups of eleven players each. ... Giovanni Benvenuti (born April 26, 1938), better known as Nino Benvenuti, is an Italian former boxer who is considered by many, including noted boxing writer Brian Doogan, to be the greatest boxer ever from Italy. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Brown was a first-team All-American in both football and lacrosse For the MPP, see Jim Brown (politician) James Nathaniel Jim Brown (born February 17, 1936) is an American professional football player and actor. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Sir Robert Bobby Charlton, KBE (born Ashington, Northumberland, 11 October 1937) is a former English football player, one of the most famous names in the game and a hero of the 1966 World Cup. ... An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Jim Clark, OBE or Jimmy Clark (March 4, 1936 – April 7, 1968) was a Formula 1 race car driver, still regarded as one of the best drivers of all time and most naturally gifted. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Muhammad Ali-Haj (born January 17, 1942 as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. ... Muhammad Ali-Haj (محمد على) (born January 17, 1942 as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Roberto Clemente Walker (August 18, 1934 – December 31, 1972) was a Major League Baseball right fielder and right-handed batter. ... Baseball is popular in the Americas and East Asia. ... Eusébio da Silva Ferreira (known by the playing name of Eusébio) (born January 25, 1942) nicknamed The Black Pearl and The Black Panther, is a Portuguese football player born in Lourenço Marques (now Maputo), Mozambique. ... An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Bob Gibson (born November 9, 1935) was a right-handed baseball pitcher for the St. ... Baseball is popular in the Americas and East Asia. ... Carlton Chester Cookie Gilchrist (born May 25, 1935 in Brackenridge, Pennsylvania) was an American football player in the American Football League. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Howe holds the Hart Trophy Gordon Gordie Howe, OC (born March 31, 1928 in Floral, Saskatchewan) is a Canadian hockey player who is often referred to as Mr. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Franz Klammer (born December 3, 1953) was an Austrian skier who dominated the downhill event throughout much of the mid to late 1970s. ... David Kopay (born June 28, 1942) was an American football player who was one of the first professional athletes to out himself as being gay. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Sanford Sandy Koufax (born Sanford Braun on December 30, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1955 to 1966. ... Baseball is popular in the Americas and East Asia. ... Denis Law (born February 24, 1940, in Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom) is a retired Scottish football player, who enjoyed a long and successful career as a striker from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Vincent Thomas Lombardi (June 11, 1913 – September 3, 1970) was one of the most successful coaches in the history of American football. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... Baseball is popular in the Americas and East Asia. ... Stanislaus Gvoth, known as Stan Mikita (born May 20, 1940) is a Slovak-Canadian ice hockey player. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Bobby Moore England captain Bobby Moore with the Jules Rimet trophy. ... An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Joe Namath, one of the most famous quarterbacks ever in the AFL. Joseph William Namath was born May 31, 1943 in the suburbs of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... // Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940 in Columbus, Ohio), also known as The Golden Bear, was a major force in professional golf from the 1960s to the mid 1990s, and is regarded as the greatest golfer of all time. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor sport where individual players or teams hit a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ... Arnold Palmer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor sport where individual players or teams hit a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor sport where individual players or teams hit a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ... Robert Gordon Bobby Orr, O.C. (born March 20, 1948 in Parry Sound, Ontario) is a retired Canadian ice hockey player. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Pelé, on scoring a goal in the 1970 World Cup final against Italy. ... An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Richard Petty (second from left) pictured with his father Lee (to his right), son Kyle (to his left), and grandson Adam (to his far left), in 2000 before the deaths of Lee and Adam. ... The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Frank Robinson (born August 31, 1935 in Beaumont, Texas), 1935) was a Major League Baseball player and is currently the manager of the Washington Nationals. ... Baseball is popular in the Americas and East Asia. ... William Bill Shankly, OBE (September 2, 1914 – September 8, 1981) was one of the most successful and respected football managers. ... An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Sir Garfield St Aubrun Sobers (born July 28, 1936 in Barbados), better known as Garry Sobers, was a West Indies cricket player. ... Cricket is a team sport played between two groups of eleven players each. ... Alfredo Di Stéfano (born July 4, 1926, at Barrancas, Argentina), is a former Argentine-born footballer who played international football for Argentina, Colombia, and, most famously, Spain. ... An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Frederick Sewards Trueman (born February 6, 1931 in Stainton, Yorkshire) was an English cricketer, regarded as one of the greatest fast bowlers in history. ... Cricket is a team sport played between two groups of eleven players each. ...

Entertainers

Woodstock: the iconic Sixties event
Woodstock: the iconic Sixties event

Woodstock File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... William Alexander Abbott aka Bud Abbott (October 2, 1895 – April 24, 1974) is a legendary American actor, producer and comedian from Asbury Park, New Jersey. ... Steve Allen on the cover of Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was a musician, comedian and writer, who was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder Ursula Andress circa the 1960s Ursula Andress (born 19 March 1936) is an actress. ... Julie Andrews as Maria, with the Von Trapp children in The Sound of Music. ... Fred Astaire Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska, was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor of Austrian and German descent. ... John Astin starring as Gomez Addams in The Addams Family John Astin (born March 30, 1930) is an American actor best known for the role of Gomez Addams on The Addams Family television series. ... Francis Thomas Avallone (born September 18, 1939 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an Italian-American actor and teen idol in the 1950s and early 1960s. ... Funicello on the Mickey Mouse Club. ... Joan Baezs 1975 bestseller Diamonds & Rust. ... Lucille Ball Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an American actress, comedian and star of I Love Lucy. ... Brigitte Bardot Brigitte Bardot (born September 28, 1934 in Paris) is a French actress and model, daughter of an industrialist. ... Billy Barty Billy Barty (born William John Bertanzetti) (October 25, 1924–December 23, 2000) was an American film actor. ... The Beach Boys, 1963 (L to R, David Marks, Carl Wilson, Dennis Wilson, Mike Love, Brian Wilson) The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the twenty-first century. ... The Beatles were a British pop and rock group from Liverpool. ... Tony Bennett, 2000 Tony Bennett (born August 3, 1926) is an American popular music, standards, and jazz singer who is widely considered to be one of the best interpretative singers in these genres. ... Jack Benny Jack Benny (born Benjamin Kubelsky, February 14, 1894 – December 26, 1974) was a comedian, vaudeville performer, film actor, and one of the most prominent early stars of American radio and television. ... Milton as Mad Man Mooney (right), with Sweetums in The Muppet Movie. ... Joey Bishop (born Joseph Abraham Gottlieb on February 3, 1918 in The Bronx, New York, USA) is a Jewish American actor. ... Bolger, circa early 1930s Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... Ernest Borgnine Ernest Borgnine (born January 24, 1917) is an American actor. ... Charles Bronson For the Welsh prisoner, see Charles Bronson (prisoner). ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an American actor, writer director, and theatrical producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and parodies. ... Carl Reiner (born March 20, 1922) is an American actor, movie director, producer, writer and comedian. ... Johnny Brown (born June 11, 1937 in Saint Petersburg, Florida) is an American actor and singer. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933) was one of the most successful female comedians on American television, thanks largely to her variety show that ran on CBS from 1967 through 1978. ... Burns in the 1950s. ... The Byrds’ original line-up. ... Sid Caesar (born Isaac Sidney Caesar on September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television sketch comedy series Your Show of Shows. ... Mario Moreno Cantinflas Mario Moreno Reyes (August 12, 1911 - April 20, 1993), better known as Cantinflas, was a Mexican actor, circus performer and comedian. ... Capucine (January 6, 1931 - March 17, 1990) was a French actress. ... Vikki Carr (19 July 1941) Born in El Paso, Texas. ... Johnny Carson John William Johnny Carson (October 23, 1925–January 23, 2005) was an American actor, comedian and writer best known for his iconic status as the host of The Tonight Show from 1962 until 1992. ... Violet Carson, in an interview with a reporter from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 1966. ... Art Carney starring as Ed Norton from The Honeymooners Art Carney (born November 4, 1918; died November 9, 2003) was an American actor in film, stage, television, and radio. ... John Joseph Edward Jack Cassidy (March 5, 1927 - December 12, 1976) was an Irish-American actor who achieved success in theater, cinema and television. ... Theodore Crawford Ted Cassidy (born July 31, 1932 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; died January 16, 1979 in Los Angeles, California) was an American actor who played Lurch and Thing on The Addams Family. ... Carol Channing photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1956 Carol Channing (born January 31, 1921 in Seattle, Washington) is a United States actress whose career was built largely on two roles, Lorelei Lee in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Dolly Gallagher Levi in Hello Dolly!. She is easily recognized by her distinctive... Roy Linwood Clark (born April 15, 1933) is one of the most versatile and well-known country music musicians and performers. ... Nat King Cole in The Blue Gardenia (1953) Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a hugely popular American singer and jazz musician. ... Sean Connery Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930 in Edinburgh, Scotland) better known simply as Sean Connery, is a Scottish actor who has starred in many films and is best known as the original cinematic James Bond. ... Tim Conway (born December 15, 1933, Willoughby, Ohio) is an American comedic actor. ... Bill Cosby as Dr. Heathcliff Huxtable on The Cosby Show Dr. William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ... Joan Crawford, photographed by Yousuf Karsh, 1948 Joan Crawford (March 23, c. ... Bing wooed fans with a sensuous voice, wit, and good looks. ... Gary Evan Crosby (June 27, 1933 - August 24, 1995) was an American singer and actor. ... Tony Curtis Tony Curtis is the stage name of Bernard Schwartz (born June 3, 1925 in The Bronx, New York to Jewish immigrants from Hungary), an actor who has appeared in over 100 films since 1949. ... This article is about Bette Davis the actress; there is also singer named Betty Davis. ... Sammy Davis, Jr. ... Doris Day Doris Day (born April 3, 1924) is an American singer, actress, and animal welfare advocate. ... Essential Neil Diamond album cover. ... Walter Elias Walt Disney (December 5, 1901 – December 15, 1966), was an American film producer, director, screenwriter, voice actor, and animator. ... The Doors, Legacy (Clockwise from top right): Jim Morrison, John Densmore, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek The Doors (formed in 1965 in Los Angeles, California) were a popular and influential American rock band. ... Mamie Van Doren Mamie Van Doren (born February 6, 1931) is an American actress and sex symbol. ... Kirk Douglas in Champion Kirk Douglas (born December 9, 1916) is an American actor. ... Patty Duke (born December 14, 1946) is an actress of the stage and screen. ... James Francis Jimmy Durante (February 10, 1893 - January 29, 1980) was an American entertainer, one of the most popular and recognized personalities of the 1920s-1960s. ... Dick Van Dyke - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Portrait photograph of Bob Dylan taken by Daniel Kramer Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24, 1941) is a highly influential American songwriter, musician, and poet. ... Clint Eastwood today. ... Barbara Eden, ca. ... Linda Evans Linda Evans was born Linda Evanstad on November 18, 1942, in Hartford, Connecticut. ... There have been several well-known people named Robert Evans, including: Robert Evans (author) Robert_Evans_(film_producer) Robert Evans (politician) Robert Evans is also the name of a firefighter who was killed in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 Bob Evans This is a disambiguation... Fonda in the 1957 classic, 12 Angry Men. ... Jane Fonda Jane Seymour Fonda (born December 21, 1937) is an Academy Award-winning American actress, model, writer, fitness guru, producer, and political activist. ... Peter Fonda Peter Henry Fonda (born February 23, 1940 according to his autobiography) is an American actor. ... Eileen Fulton Eileen Fulton (born Margaret Elizabeth McLarty on September 13, 1933 in Asheville, North Carolina) is an American actress. ... Judy Garland, circa 1943. ... James Garner as Jim Egan in 8 Simple Rules James Garner (born April 7, 1928) is an American film and television actor. ... Jack Gilford Jack Gilford (July 25, 1908 – June 2, 1990) was an American actor with a long and successful career on the Broadway stage, films and television. ... Jackie Gleason and Audrey Meadows in a staged publicity shot for The Honeymooners. ... Cary Grant Cary Grant (January 18, 1904 - November 29, 1986), was an English-American motion picture actor. ... Kathryn Crosby (1933 - ) born as Olive Kathryn Grandstaff is an American actress and singer who performed her most memorable roles under the name Kathryn Grant. ... Richard Dick Claxton Gregory, born October 12, 1932 in St. ... Griffith as Andy Taylor on The Andy Griffith Show Andrew Samuel Andy Griffith (born June 1, 1926) is an American actor, writer and producer from Mount Airy, North Carolina. ... Mervyn Edward Griffin, Jr. ... Frederick Hubbard Gwynne (July 10, 1926 – July 2, 1993) was a 6 ft 5 in (1. ... Buddy Hackett (August 31, 1924 - June 30, 2003), born Leonard Hacker, was an American comedian and actor. ... Long Island, New York-born Joey Heatherton was christened Davenie Johanna Heatherton in 1944. ... Jimi Hendrix James Marshall Jimi Hendrix Hendricks (27 November 1942 – 18 September , 1970) was an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... Audrey Hepburn in Funny Face. ... Katharine Hepburn Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an iconic star of American film, television and stage, widely recognized for her sharp wit, New England gentility and fierce independence. ... Charlton Heston (born John Charles Carter on October 4, 1923, although the year is usually given as 1924), is an American film actor noted for heroic roles, and his long involvement in political issues. ... Alfred Hitchcock Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, KBE (born on August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a British – American film director closely associated with the thriller genre. ... Dustin Hoffman Hoffman with Ben Stiller in 2004s Meet the Fockers. ... Leslie Townes Hope KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), best known as Bob Hope, was a famous entertainer, having appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, movies and in army concerts. ... Dennis Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an American actor and film-maker. ... Ronald Howard may refer to: Ron Howard (b. ... Rock Hudson (November 17, 1925 – October 2, 1985) was an American actor, famous for his rugged good looks. ... The Jackson 5 in 1971. ... A singing duo in the 1960s, composed of Chad Stuart and Jeremy Clyde. ... Antonio Carlos Jobim (born Antonio Carlos Brasileiro de Almeida Jobim, January 25, 1927 in Rio de Janeiro - December 8, 1994 in New York City), also called Tom Jobim, was a Brazilian composer, arranger, singer, pianist and one of the greatest legends of bossa nova. ... Carolyn Jones starring as Morticia Addams Carolyn Jones (April 28, 1930 - August 3, 1983) was an American actress. ... Shirley Jones, in a still from the opening credits of The Partridge Family. ... Tom Jones is the name of: A novel by Henry Fielding, see The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling A movie by Tony Richardson, based on the novel, see Tom Jones (movie) A singer and sex symbol, see Tom Jones (singer) A writer of musicals, see Tom Jones (writer) This... Janis Joplin on the cover of her posthumously released live album In Concert Janis Lyn Joplin (January 19, 1943 – October 4, 1970) was an American blues-influenced rock singer and occasional songwriter with a distinctive voice. ... Boris Karloff Boris Karloff (November 23, 1887 - February 2, 1969), born William Henry Pratt, was a famous actor in horror films. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913–March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... Joseph Frank Keaton VI (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966), always known as Buster Keaton, was a popular and influential American silent-film comic actor and filmmaker. ... Gene Kelly (1912-1996) Eugene Curran Kelly, born on August 23, 1912, and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was an Irish-American dancer, actor, singer, director, and choreographer. ... Knotts as Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show Jesse Donald Don Knotts (born July 21, 1924) is an American actor. ... Harvey Herschel Kormen (b. ... Nancy Kwan on the cover of Life Magazine 1960 Nancy Kwan (pinyin: Guān Jiāqiàn, Cantonese: Kwan Ka Shin) was born on May 19, 1939) in Hong Kong to a Chinese father and Scottish mother. ... Bert Lahr, born Irving Lahrheim, (August 13, 1895 - December 4, 1967) was a United States comic actor, best remembered today for his role as the Cowardly Lion in the classic 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, but known during his life for a career in burlesque, vaudeville and Broadway. ... The Rat Pack. ... Norman Lear Norman Lear (born July 27, 1922) is an American television writer and producer who produced such popular 1970s sitcoms as All in the Family, Sanford and Son and Maude. ... Bruce Lee. ... Janet Leigh Janet Leigh (July 6, 1927 in Merced, California—October 3, 2004 in Beverly Hills) born Jeanette Helen Morrison was an American actress. ... Jack Lemmon Jack Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001) was a consummate Hollywood actor. ... Jerry Lewis Joseph Levitch (born March 16, 1926), better known as Jerry Lewis, is a Jewish American comedian, actor, producer, and director known for his slapstick humor and his charity fund-raising telethons for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. ... Art Linkletter (born Arthur Gordon Kelly on July 17, 1912) was the host of two of the longest running shows in broadcast history: House Party which ran on CBS TV and Radio for 25 years, and People Are Funny which ran on NBC TV and Radio for 19 years. ... Gina Lollobridiga (born 6 July 1927) is an Italian actress. ... Sophia Loren in 1955 Sophia Loren (born September 20, 1934) is considered to be the most famous Italian actress of all time. ... Peter Lorre, 1946, by Yousuf Karsh Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964) was an actor especially known for playing roles with sinister overtones in Hollywood crime films and mysteries. ... Paul Lynde Paul Edward Lynde (June 13, 1926 – January 10, 1982) was an American comedian and actor. ... Shirley MacLaine as a young woman Shirley MacLaine, born Shirley MacLean Beaty (born April 24, 1934 in Richmond, Virginia), is an American actress, well-known not only for her acting but for her devotion to her belief in reincarnation. ... Ann-Margret Ann-Margret (born April 28, 1941) is a Swedish-born actress and singer. ... Dean Martin in 1965 at a St. ... Groucho Marx poses for an NBC promotional photograph Julius Henry Marx, known as Groucho Marx (October 2, 1890 – August 19, 1977), was an American comedian, working both with his siblings, the Marx Brothers, and on his own. ... James Mason in North by Northwest. ... Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor and one of the most popular and highly-successful box-office superstars of the 1960s and 1970s. ... The Monkees in 1967 (left to right): Michael Nesmith, Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork The Monkees were a four-man band who appeared in an American television series of the same name, which ran on NBC from 1966 to 1968. ... Statue of Mary Tyler Moore in downtown Minneapolis Mary Tyler Moore (born on December 29, 1936) is an American actress and comedian, best known for The Mary Tyler Moore Show, in which she starred as Mary Richards, a 30ish single woman who worked as a news producer at WJM-TV... Rita Moreno on the Muppet Show with Animal, (Season 1, Episode 05) Rita Moreno (born December 11, 1931 in Humacao, Puerto Rico) is an actress who has achieved fame both in Hollywood and Broadway. ... Noriyuki Pat Morita (born June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California) is a Japanese-American actor best known for the roles of Arnold on the TV show Happy Days and in the movie The Karate Kid, for which he was nominated for Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1984. ... Howard Morris (September 4, 1919 – May 21, 2005) was an American comic actor and director. ... Zero Mostel in Ulysses in Nighttown, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 Zero Mostel (February 25, 1915 – September 8, 1977) was a Tony Award-winning stage actor. ... Paul Newman Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an Jewish American actor and film director. ... Jack Nicholson, John Joseph Nicholson (born April 22, 1937) is a highly successful, iconic American method actor. ... David Niven was the second unofficial James Bond. ... Roy Orbison was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. ... Gregory Peck Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916–June 12, 2003) was an American film actor of Irish and Armenian Catholic extraction. ... Oscar Peterson Oscar Emmanuel Peterson is a Canadian jazz pianist and composer. ... Patricia Phoenix, as Elsie Tanner on Coronation Street, in a still from an episode first aired in the early 1970s. ... Pink Floyd circa 1971. ... Sidney Poitier Sidney Poitier, KBE (born February 20, 1927) is a Bahamian American actor. ... Vincent Price on Broadway as Mr. ... Richard Pryor Richard Franklin Lenox Thomas Pryor (born December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American comedian and actor. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock and Roll, or as just simply The King, was an American singer who had an immeasurable effect on world culture. ... Otis Redding (September 9, 1941 – December 10, 1967) was an influential American deep soul singer, known for his passionate delivery and his posthumous hit single, (Sittin On) the Dock of the Bay, also one of his most respected tracks. ... Robert Redford Charles Robert Redford Jr. ... Steve Reeves (Stephen L. Reeves) (January 21, 1926 - May 5, 2000), was a bodybuilder, actor, and author. ... Debbie Reynolds in 1954 Debbie Reynolds (born April 1, 1932) is an American actress and singer. ... Don Rickles (born May 8, 1926) is an American comedian and actor. ... Chita Rivera (born Dolores Conchita Figueroa del Rivero on January 23, 1933 in Washington, D.C.) - Broadway actress of Puerto Rican descent, and the first Hispanic woman to receive a Kennedy Center Honors award. ... The Rolling Stones, 1964. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Daniel Hale Rowan (Dan) (July 22, 1922 - September 22, 1987) was an American comedian. ... Dick Martin (born January 30, 1922 in Battle Creek, Michigan) is an American comedian. ... Peter Sellers Richard Henry Sellers (September 8, 1925 – July 24, 1980), better known as Peter Sellers, was a British comedian, talented comic actor, and performer on The Goon Show (a long-running BBC radio show, 1951-1960). ... Edwin Rodman Rod Serling (December 25, 1924 – June 28, 1975) was a screenwriter, most famous for his science fiction TV series, The Twilight Zone. ... Ross Bagdasarian (January 27, 1919 – January 16, 1972), pianist, songwriter, actor, and record producer was born in Fresno, California. ... Born Richard Schulefand (December 1, 1923, actor/comedian Dick Shawn is best remembered for his roles as Sylvester Marcus, bohemian beach bum son of Mrs. ... Dinah Shore (born Frances Rose Shore, February 29, 1916 – February 24, 1994) was an American singer, actress and talk show host. ... Bridge Over Troubled Water was Simon and Garfunkels last album; the title track was their only number one hit in the United Kingdom. ... Old Blue Eyes belts one out Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer who is considered one of the finest vocalists of all time, renowned for his impeccable phrasing and timing. ... Frank Sinatra, Jr. ... Nancy Sinatra as shown on the cover of the soundtrack to Movin with Nancy On the cover of Playboy, May 1995 Nancy Sinatra (born June 8, 1940) is an American singer and actress. ... Bernard Richard Red Skelton (July 18, 1913 – September 17, 1997) was an American comedian born in Vincennes, Indiana who started in vaudeville as a teenager, worked his way up to Broadway shows, secondary roles in MGM movies, radio performances and finally popularity in the early days of TV. His eponymous... The Smothers Brothers are an American music-and-comedy team, formed by real-life brothers Tom Smothers (born 1937) and Dick Smothers (born 1939). ... Elke Sommer (born 5 November 1940) is a German born actor, entertainer, and artist. ... Sonny and Cher were an American rock and roll duo, made up of husband and wife team Sonny Bono and Cher in the 60s and 70s. ... Jill St. ... Connie Stevens Connie Stevens (born August 8, 1938) is an American actress and singer. ... Inger Stevens Inger Stevens was an American movie and TV actress. ... Stella Stevens ( born October 1, 1936 ) is an actress. ... There are several individuals by the name of James Stewart. ... This article is about Edward Sullivan, the entertainer. ... Reissue album cover showing The Supremes in 1966. ... Russ Tamblyn (born 30 December 1934 in Los Angeles, California) is an actor. ... Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908–November 5, 1982) was a French filmmaker. ... Elizabeth Taylor Dame Elizabeth Taylor, DBE (born February 27, 1932) is a English-born Academy Award winning actress. ... Danny Thomas Danny Thomas (January 6, 1914 - February 6, 1991) was an American nightclub comedian and television and film actor of Lebanese Antiochian Orthodox descent. ... Marlo Thomas (born Margaret Julia Thomas on November 21, 1937 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American actress, first appearing on the scene as That Girl in the 1960s ABC sitcom. ... The Three Stooges was an American comedy act in the 20th century. ... Image:ST3. ... Robert Wagner (born 10 February 1930) is an American actor. ... Burt Ward as Robin Burt Ward (born July 6, 1945) is best remembered for his work as Robin, the Boy Wonder, in the 60s television series, Batman. ... John Wayne (May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), nicknamed Duke, was an American film actor whose career began in silent movies in the 1920s. ... Tuesday Weld, born August 27, 1943, is an American film actress. ... Raquel Welch in the film poster for One Million Years B.C. Raquel Welch (born September 5, 1940) is an American actress. ... Orson Welles, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) is generally considered one of Hollywoods greatest directors, as well as a fine actor, broadcaster and screenwriter. ... Adam West as Batman Adam West (born William West Anderson on September 19, 1928 in Walla Walla, Washington) is best known as the actor who played the role of Batman on the original television program that ran from 1966 to 1968. ... The Who in 1968. ... Gene Wilder Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American actor, who has starred in more than thirty movies. ... Andy Williams This page is about the singer. ... Clerow Flip Wilson (December 8, 1933–November 25, 1998) was an African-American comedian and actor. ... Natalie Wood Natalia Nikolaevna Zakharenko (July 20, 1938 – November 29, 1981), better known as Natalie Wood, was an American film actress. ... Stevie Wonder is a legend in rock and pop music history. ... Ed Wynn (November 9, 1886 - June 19, 1966) was a popular United States entertainer, born Isaiah Edward Leopold in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Keenan Wynn, (27 July 1916 – 14 October 1986), an American character actor and member of a well-known show-business family. ... Led Zeppelin was a British rock band, who were pivotal in the development of hard rock and heavy metal, and became one of the most popular and influential bands of all time. ... Mama Cass Elliot (September 19, 1941 – July 29, 1974), born Ellen Naomi Cohen, was a noted American singer who performed with The Mamas & the Papas. ... The Mamas and the Papas (credited as The Mamas and the Papas on the debut album cover) were a leading vocal group of the 1960s. ...

See also

This is a list of albums that are particularly notable or influential. ...

Further Viewing

To see examples of the idealism of the Sixties, view the Woodstock Movie. Woodstock redirects here. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m