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Encyclopedia > Sita
Image:Example.of.complex.text.rendering.svg This article contains Indic text.
Without rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes or other symbols instead of Indic characters; or irregular vowel positioning and a lack of conjuncts.
Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman.
Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman.

Sita (Sanskrit: सीता; "Sītā", also spelled Seeta) is the wife of Rama, the seventh avatāra of Vishnu, and is esteemed an exemplar of womanly and wifely virtue. According to Hindu belief, Sita was an avatāra of Lakshmi, Vishnu's consort, who chose to reincarnate herself on Earth as Sita and endure an arduous life, to provide humankind an example of good virtues. Sita is one of the principal characters in the Ramayana, a Hindu epic named after her husband Rama. Image File history File links Example. ... The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas (writing systems) used in South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, Manchuria. ... Download high resolution version (640x850, 107 KB)Lord Ram This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (640x850, 107 KB)Lord Ram This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Lakshaman (far left) with Rama (centre), Sita (far right) and Hanuman (kneeling) - Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna temple, Watford, England Lakshmana (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मण; IAST Laká¹£maṇa) was the brother and close companion of Rama, and himself a hero in the famous epic Ramayana. Within Hindu tradition Lakshmana is considered to be... For the Tamil movie by same name see Anjaneya, Movie This article is about a Divine Entity in Hinduism. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is an old Indo-Aryan language from the Indian Subcontinent, the classical literary language of the Hindus of India[1], a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... See Avatar (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being or Ultimate Reality for Vaishnavas and a manifestation of Brahman in the Advaita or Smarta traditions. ... For South Indian actress, see Laxmi (actress). ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... The great Hindu Epics are also occasionally termed Mahakavya (Great Compositions); the terms refer to a canon of Hindu religious scripture. ... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ...

Contents

Legend

Sita was a foundling, discovered in a furrow in a ploughed field, and for that reason is regarded as a daughter of Bhudevi, the earth Goddess. She was found and adopted by Janaka, king of Mithila and his wife Sunayana. Upon her coming of age, a swayamwara was held to select a suitable husband for her, and she was wed to Rama, prince of Ayodhya, an avatara of Vishnu. Bhuma Devi or Bhumi Devi or Bhu Devi is the divine wife of Lord Vishnu. ... In ancient India, Janaka (Sanskrit: जनक, janaka) or Raja Janaka (राजा जनक, rājā janaka) was the king of Mithila Kingdom. ... Swayamvara, in ancient India, was a practice of choosing a life partner, among a list of suitors by a girl of marriageable age. ... Ayodhya   (Hindi: अयोध्या, Urdu: ایودھیا IAST Ayodhyā) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... The ten avatars of Lord Vishnu, copyright BBT In Hindu philosophy, an avatar, avatara or avataram (Sanskrit: , IAST: ), most commonly refers to the incarnation (bodily manifestation) of a higher being (deva), or the Supreme Being (God) onto planet Earth. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being or Ultimate Reality for Vaishnavas and a manifestation of Brahman in the Advaita or Smarta traditions. ...

Ravana abducts Sita, by Ravi Varma
Ravana abducts Sita, by Ravi Varma

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (489x694, 76 KB) Ravana kills Jathayu; the captive Sita despairs. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (489x694, 76 KB) Ravana kills Jathayu; the captive Sita despairs. ... Raja Ravi Varma (1848-1906) Raja Ravi Varma (1848-1906) was an Indian painter who achieved recognition for his depiction of scenes from the epics of the Mahabharata and Ramayana. ...

Exile and abduction

Main article: Ramayana

Some time after the wedding, circumstances became such that Rama felt it his duty to leave Ayodhya and spend a period of exile in the forests of Dandakaranya. At this time, he was 25, Sita 18 and his brother Lakshmana 16. [1]. Sita willingly renounced the comforts of the palace and joined her husband in braving the travails of exile, even living in a forest. Worse was however to come; the forest was the scene for the abduction of Sita by Ravana, King of Lanka, one of her former suitors. Ravana kidnapped Sita while her husband was away hunting. Jatayu, the vulture-king, who was a friend of Rama, tried to protect her, but Ravana chopped off his wings. Jatayu survived long enough to inform Rama of what had happened. For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Dandakaranya is a mythological region roughly equivalent to the Bastar District in the centre east part of India. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, IAST ; sometimes transliterated Raavana and as Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Jatayu (Sanskrit: जटायू, jatāyū) is the son of Aruna and nephew of Garuda. ...


Ravana held her captive in his distant island realm.In captivity, Sita not only consistently rejected the many advances of her powerful and royal captor, but also preserved her chastity of mind, never once wavering in her adherence to her husband. She was finally rescued by her husband Rama, who waged a tremendous battle to defeat Ravana and secure the release of Sita.


Later life

The couple returned to Ayodhya, where Rama was crowned king with Sita by his side. While the trust and affection in which Rama held his wife never wavered, it soon became evident that a (perhaps small) section of the citizenry of Ayodhya found the fact of Sita's long residence in captivity, under the power of Ravana, a circumstance difficult to accept. The story goes that an intemperate washerman, while berating his wayward wife, declared that he was "no pusillanimous Rama who would take his wife back after she had lived in the house of another man". This calumnious comment was reported back to Rama, who knew that the aspersion cast on Sita was entirely baseless; nevertheless, he felt his position as ruler undermined by the constant possibility of slander attaching itself to his hitherto unimpeachable dynasty and personal reign. It was this train of thought that led Rama to desire the removal of Sita from his household.


Sita was thus again in exile; she was not only alone this time but also pregnant. She sought refuge in the hermitage of the sage Valmiki, where she was delivered of twin sons, Lava and Kusha. Valmiki composes the Ramayana Maharishi Valmiki (Sanskrit: वाल्मिकी, vālmikī) is the author of the Hindu epic Ramayana. ... Lava and his twin brother Kusha are the children of the Hindu God Rama and his wife Sita Devi, whose story is told in the Ramayana. ... Kusha, in Hindu mythology, was one of the twin sons of Lord Rama and Sita (the other being Lava). ...


Sita raised her sons single-handedly in the hermitage. They grew up to be valiant and intelligent and were eventually united with their father. Once she had witnessed the acceptance of her children by Rama, Sita sought final refuge in the arms of her mother Bhumidevi, the Earth Goddess. Hearing her plea for release from an unjust world and from a life that had rarely been happy, the earth dramatically split open; Bhumidevi manifested herself and took Sita away to a better world. In Hinduism, Bhumidevi, who may also be called Bhumi, is the goddess of the earth. ...


This part of the epic has been disputed. Sages point to it being written later than the Valmiki Ramayan. Some believe that this part of the story, Luv-Kushkanda, was promoted by the British. Many Hindu organizations today disown Luv-Kush kanda and state that after Ram is crowned king there is Ram rajya, when everyone is happy.


Sita also took part in the Hindu ritual of Ashvamedha. The copulation with a dead horse as narrated in the Uttara Kanda (book 7). In this narrative, Rama was married to a single wife, Sita, who at the time was not with him, having been excluded from Rama's capital of Ayodhya. She was therefore represented by a statue for the queen's ceremony (7.x[citation needed]). Sita was living in Valmiki's forest ashram with her twin children by Rama, Lava and Kusha, whose birth was unknown to Rama. In its wanderings, the horse, accompanied by an army and the monkey-king Hanuman, enters the forest and encounters Lava, who ignores the warning written on the horse's headplate not to hinder its progress. He tethers the horse, and with Kusha challenges the army, which is unable to defeat the brothers. The Ashvamedha ( horse sacrifice) is one of the most important royal rituals of Vedic religion, described in detail in the Yajurveda (TS 7. ...


Significance

The actions, reactions and instincts manifested by Sita at every juncture in a long and arduous life are deemed exemplary; her story is one on which every young girl in India is raised to this day. The values that she enshrined and adhered to at every point in the course of a demanding life are the values of womanly virtue held sacred by countless generations of Indians.


The story of Sita's kidnapping and subsequent rescue forms the core of the Indian epic, the Ramayana, confirmed and written by the sage Valmiki in whose hermitage Sita took refuge during her second stint of exile. For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ...


Sita's talks in the Ramayana

While the Ramayana mostly concentrates on Rama's actions, Sita also speaks many times during the exile. The first time is in Chitrakoot where she narrates an ancient story to Rama, whereby Rama promises to Sita that he will never kill anybody without provocation. For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... Chitrakoot is a religious town in the Bundelkhand region of central India, notable for the number of its temples and sites from Hindu mythology. ... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ...


The second time Sita is shown talking prominently to Ravana. Ravana has come to her in the form of a Brahmin and Sita tells him that he doesn't look like one. A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, IAST ; sometimes transliterated Raavana and as Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, IAST ; sometimes transliterated Raavana and as Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... A Brahmin (anglicised from the Sanskrit word IAST ; Devanagari ), also known as Vipra, Dvija, Dvijottama (best of the Dvijas), (god on Earth) is the highest caste in Indian caste system within Hindu society. ...


The most interesting of her talks are with Hanuman when he reaches Lanka. Hanuman wants an immediate meeting of Rama and Sita, and thus he proposes to Sita to ride on his back. Sita refuses as she does not want to run away like a thief; instead she wants her husband Rama to come and defeat Ravana to save her. For the Tamil movie by same name see Anjaneya, Movie This article is about a Divine Entity in Hinduism. ... Lanka is the name given in Hindu mythology to the island fortress capital of the evil king Ravana in the epic Ramayana. ... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, IAST ; sometimes transliterated Raavana and as Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ...


When Rama wins the war, Hanuman goes to Ashok Vatika to give this news to Sita, and asks for permission to kill the female Rakshasas who have tortured her. Sita tells Hanuman an ancient story known as Na parah paap ma adate (Do not follow the sins committed by others) - one should behave according to one's dharma (righteousness) even if another has done you wrong. Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... For the Tamil movie by same name see Anjaneya, Movie This article is about a Divine Entity in Hinduism. ... For the Tamil movie by same name see Anjaneya, Movie This article is about a Divine Entity in Hinduism. ... Dharma (Sanskrit: धर्म) or Dhamma (Pāli: धमा) (Natural Law) refers to the underlying order in Nature and human behaviour considered to be in accord with that order. ...


Once she utters bad words to Lakshmana when he does not go after Rama to save him, but in a later part of the story she repents this. Lakshaman (far left) with Rama (centre), Sita (far right) and Hanuman (kneeling) - Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna temple, Watford, England Lakshmana (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मण; IAST Lakṣmaṇa) was the brother and close companion of Rama, and himself a hero in the famous epic Ramayana. Within Hindu tradition Lakshmana is considered to be... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ...


Etymology of the name Sita

Deities of Sri Sita Devi (far right), Sri Rama (center), Sri Lakshmana (far left) and Sri Hanuman (below seated) at the Bhaktivedanta Manor, Watford England
Deities of Sri Sita Devi (far right), Sri Rama (center), Sri Lakshmana (far left) and Sri Hanuman (below seated) at the Bhaktivedanta Manor, Watford England

In common with other major figures of Hindu legend, Sita is known by many names. As the daughter of king Janaka, she is as Janaki; as the princess of Mithila, Mythili or Maithili; as the wife of Raama, she is called Ramaa. Her father Janaka had earned the sobriquet "Videha" due to his ability to transcend body consciousness; Sita is therefore also known as Vaidehi. Image of Sri sri Sita Rama Laxmana and Hanuman at the bhaktivedanta Manor, Watford, England File links The following pages link to this file: Rama Categories: GFDL images ... Image of Sri sri Sita Rama Laxmana and Hanuman at the bhaktivedanta Manor, Watford, England File links The following pages link to this file: Rama Categories: GFDL images ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... In ancient India, Janaka (Sanskrit: जनक, janaka) or Raja Janaka (राजा जनक, rājā janaka) was the king of Mithila Kingdom. ... In ancient India, Janaka (Sanskrit: जनक, janaka) or Raja Janaka (राजा जनक, rājā janaka) was the king of Mithila Kingdom. ... Vaidehi or Vaydehi (Sanskrit: वैथेहि) is another name for the goddess Sita, or Sita Devi, from the Hindu epic the Ramayana. ...


However, she is of course best known by the name "Sita", which literally means "furrow". The word "furrow" was a poetic term in ancient India, its imagery redolent of fecundity and the many blessings accruent from settled agriculture. The Sita of the Ramayana may have been named after a more ancient Vedic goddess Sita, who is mentioned once in the Rigveda as an earth goddess who blesses the land with good crops. fur·row Pronunciation: f&r-()O, f&-()rO Function: noun Etymology: Middle English furgh, forow, from Old English furh; akin to Old High German furuh furrow, Latin porca 1 a : a trench in the earth made by a plow b : plowed land : FIELD 2 : something that resembles the track of... The religion of the Vedic civilization is the predecessor of classical Hinduism, usually included in the term. ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture A goddess is a female deity, in contrast with a male deity known as a god. Many cultures have goddesses. ... The Rigveda (Sanskrit: , a tatpurusha compound of praise, verse and knowledge) is a collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns dedicated to the gods. ...


Other legends

Two other legends obtaining in certain versions of the Ramayana may be mentioned in connection with Sita. These legends are significant in that they do not endorse the mainstream view of Sita having been an avatara of the goddess Lakshmi. For South Indian actress, see Laxmi (actress). ...


Vedavati

Some versions of the Ramayana suggest that Sita was a reincarnation of Vedavati, an orphan lady who had been ravished by Ravana. The legend goes thus: In Hindu mythology, Vedavati is speculated to have been the spirit of Sita Devi, the wife of Rama in the epic Ramayana. ...


Sage Kushadhwaja was a learned and pious scholar residing in a remote hermitage. His daughter Vedavati grows up in her father's hermitage to become an ardent devotee of Vishnu, and resolves early in life to wed no one other than Vishnu. Her father forbears from stifling her aspirations, and even rejects proposals from many powerful kings and celestial beings who seek his daughter's hand in marriage. Among those rejected is Sambhu, a powerful Daitya king. Smarting under his humiliation, Shambhu seizes an opportunity and murders Vedavati's parents on a moonless night. Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being or Ultimate Reality for Vaishnavas and a manifestation of Brahman in the Advaita or Smarta traditions. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being or Ultimate Reality for Vaishnavas and a manifestation of Brahman in the Advaita or Smarta traditions. ...


Vedavati continues perforce to reside at the hermitage of her parents, meditating upon Vishnu. She is described as being inexpressibly beautiful, dressed in the hide of a black antelope, her hair matted, the bloom of her youth enhanced by her austerities. Ravana, the ruler of Lanka, once finds Vedavati seated in meditation and is captivated by her beauty. He propositions her and is rejected. Ravana mocks her austerities and her devotion to Vishnu; finding himself firmly rejected at every turn, he finally molests Vedavati.


Her chastity sullied beyond redemption, Vedavati immolates herself on a pyre, vowing to return in another age and be the cause of Ravana's destruction. She is duly reborn as Sita, wife of Rama, and became the direct cause of Ravana's destruction at his hands. In the process, Vedavati also receives the boon she so single-mindedly sought: Vishnu, in his avatara as Rama, becomes her husband. In some versions of the Ramayana, sage Agastya relates this entire story to Rama. In Hinduism, Agastya (अगस्त्य in devanagari, pronounced as /ə gəs tyə/; also transliterated as Agathiar அகத்தியர் in Tamil, ಅಗಸ್ತ್ಯ in Kannada, Agasthiar, Agastyar and in other ways) is a legendary Vedic sage or rishi. ...


Daughter of Mandodari and Ravana

A somewhat obscure legend obtains in some parts of Kerala, which seeks to explain Sita's birth. This legend goes thus: Kerala ( ; Malayalam: േകരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ...


Although they were married at the end of a courtship of lyrical majesty, Ravana and his wife Mandodari grow estranged from each other since Mandodari finds it impossible to condone or ignore her husband's arrogance and misdeeds. In particular, Mandodari is repelled and distraught at her husband's ravishment of the hapless Vedavati. She soon afterwards finds herself pregnant, and fears that the child within her could be the harbinger of her husband's doom, as per Vadavati's awful oath. Despite her judgment of her husband, Mandodari cannot condemn him; and also cannot do away with a child even if her suspicions are confirmed, for, she may consider, how long can Fate be defied? Both these considerations are quintessentially in the spirit of Hindu legend, as indeed is her chosen course of action. A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, IAST ; sometimes transliterated Raavana and as Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... Mandodari (Sanskrit: मंदोदरी) was the daughter of the King of Danavas, Mayasura and celestial dancer, Hema. ... In Hindu mythology, Vedavati is speculated to have been the spirit of Sita Devi, the wife of Rama in the epic Ramayana. ...


Mandodari goes to her father's home in mainland India, and then on a series of pilgrimages, to prevent Ravana or anybody else from finding that she is pregnant. As the birth grows near, Mandodari seeks around for a suitable foster-home for her child. She discovers that Janaka, the pious king of Mithila, a man of noble character and eminent lineage, is childless; the deeply sorrowful king is intent upon performing a yagya to seek the boon of a child. At this time, a female child is born to Mandodari. Soon afterwards, just before Janaka begins ploughing a field preparatory to the intended rituals, Mandodari manages to spirit her baby into the field and into Janaka's path. King Janaka duly discovers the child and adopts her. Gratified at this turn of events, Mandodari returns to her husband and resumes her everyday life. The child is given the name "Sita" and grows up in king Janaka's household. In ancient India, Janaka (Sanskrit: जनक, janaka) or Raja Janaka (राजा जनक, rājā janaka) was the king of Mithila Kingdom. ... Mithila (Sanskrit: मिथिला, mithilā) was a kingdom in ancient India. ... See Yajna and Yagyas ...


These legends build on ancient Indian traditions which hold, in wry spirit, that one's worst enemies are re-born as one's own children to fulfill the karma of one's sins. Karma (Sanskrit act, action, performance[1]; Pāli kamma) ( ) is the concept of action or deed in Dharmic religions understood as denoting the entire cycle of cause and effect described in Hindu and Buddhist philosophies. ...


See also

Goddesses are an integral part of Hinduism, and the worship of goddesses is a significant aspect of Hindu religion. ...

Further reading

  • Hindu Goddesses: Vision of the Divine Feminine in the Hindu Religious traditions (ISBN 81-208-0379-5) by David Kinsley
  • The Ramayana (2001) by Ramesh Menon

External links

The Rāmāyaņa by Valmiki
Characters
Dasaratha | Kausalya | Sumitra | Kaikeyi | Janaka | Manthara | Rama | Bharata | Lakshmana | Shatrughna | Sita | Urmila | Mandavi | Shrutakirti | Viswamitra | Ahalya | Jatayu | Sampati | Hanuman | Sugriva | Vali | Angada | Jambavantha | Vibhishana | Tataka | Surpanakha | Maricha | Subahu | Khara | Ravana | Kumbhakarna | Mandodari | Mayasura | Indrajit | Prahasta | Akshayakumara | Atikaya | Lava | Kusha
Other
Ayodhya | Mithila | Lanka | Sarayu | Treta Yuga | Raghuvamsa | Lakshman Rekha | Aditya Hridayam | Oshadhiparvata | Sundara Kanda | Pushpaka Vimana | Vedavati | Vanara
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For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Valmiki composes the Ramayana Maharishi Valmiki (Sanskrit: वाल्मिकी, vālmikÄ«) is the author of the Hindu epic Ramayana. ... Dasaratha (Sanskrit: दशरथ, IAST DaÅ›aratha) in Hindu history is the king of Ayodhya and a descendant of Raghuvamsa. ... In Hindu Mythology, Kausalya is the wife of King Dasaratha and the mother of Rama. ... Kousalya, Sumitra and Kaike are the three wives of King Dasaratha of Ayodhya, in the 24,000-verse Sanskrit epic called the Ramayana, and the mothers of the heroes Rama, Bharatha, and Lakshmana. ... Kousalya, Sumitra and Kaike are the three wives of King Dasaratha of Ayodhya, in the 24,000-verse Sanskrit epic called the Ramayana, and the mothers of the heroes Rama, Bharatha, and Lakshmana. ... In ancient India, Janaka (Sanskrit: जनक, janaka) or Raja Janaka (राजा जनक, rājā janaka) was the king of Mithila Kingdom. ... Manthara, in the Hindu epic Ramayana, is a servant who convinced Kaikeyi that the Ayodhya throne belonged to her son Bharata and that Rama should be exiled from the kingdom. ... Lord Sri Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Bharata (Sanskrit: भरत, IAST Bharata) was the second brother of the main protagonist Lord Rama, and the son of Emperor Dasaratha and Kaikeyi of the Solar Dynasty. ... Lakshaman (far left) with Rama (centre), Sita (far right) and Hanuman (kneeling) - Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna temple, Watford, England Lakshmana (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मण; IAST Laká¹£maṇa) was the brother and close companion of Rama, and himself a hero in the famous epic Ramayana. Within Hindu tradition Lakshmana is considered to be... Shatrughna (Sanskrit: शत्रुघ्न, á¹£atrughna), in Hindu epic Ramayana was the youngest brother of Lord Rama. ... This article is about Sita Devi, the wife of Rama. ... In Hindu epic Ramayana, Urmila was the daughter of King Janaka of Mithila and the younger sister of Sita. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Mandavi was the daughter of Kushadvaja, a brother of King Janaka of Mithila and hence a cousin of Sita. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Shrutakirti was the daughter of Kushadvaja, a brother of King Janaka of Mithila and hence a cousin of Sita. ... Brahmarishi Viswamitra or Vishwamitra (Sanskrit: विश्वमित्र, viá¹£vamitra) is one of the most venerated sages of Hinduism. ... Ahalya (Sanskrit: अहल्या, ahalyā) was the wife of Rishi Gautama. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Jatayu (Sanskrit: जटायू, jatāyÅ«) is the son of Aruna and nephew of Garuda. ... In Hindu mythology, Sampati was one of the two sons of Aruna the brother of Garuda. ... For the Tamil movie by same name see Anjaneya, Movie This article is about a Divine Entity in Hinduism. ... In Hinduism, Sugriva was the younger brother of Vali. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Vali was the monkey-King of Kishkindha, a son of Indra and the elder brother of Sugriva. ... In Hinduism, Angada is a Vanara who helped Rama find Sita in the Hindu epic Ramayana. ... Jambavantha (also known as Jambavan or Jamvanta) (Sanskrit: (जाम्‍बवान) is a bear in Hinduism and believe to lived from Treta Yuga to Dvapara Yuga. ... Vibhishana (Sanskrit: विभीषण, ) is a character in the epic Ramayana. ... For the municipality in the Philippines, see Taraka, Lanao del Sur. ... Surpanakha is Ravanas sister in the epic Ramayana Surpanakha is Ravanas sister in the epic Ramayana. ... In Hindu mythology, Maricha was a demon who played a very important part in twisting the tale of Ramayana. ... Subahu, in Hindu mythology was a demon who tried to interrupt Viswamitras yaga. ... Khara, in the Hindu epic Ramayana, was a man-eating Rakshasa. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, IAST ; sometimes transliterated Raavana and as Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mandodari (Sanskrit: मंदोदरी) was the daughter of the King of Danavas, Mayasura and celestial dancer, Hema. ... In Hindu mythology, Maya, or Mayasura was a great ancient king of the Asura, Daitya and Rakshasa races upon earth. ... Victory of Meghanada. ... In the Hindu epic the Ramayana, Prahasta was a powerful rakshasa warrior and chief commander of Ravanas army of Lanka. ... Akshayakumara was one of the sons of Ravana. ... Atikaya was the son of Lord of Lanka, Ravana and Queen Dhanyamalini, who was the second wife of Ravana. ... Lava and his twin brother Kusha are the children of the Hindu God Rama and his wife Sita Devi, whose story is told in the Ramayana. ... Kusha, in Hindu mythology, was one of the twin sons of Lord Rama and Sita (the other being Lava). ... Ayodhya   (Hindi: अयोध्या, Urdu: ایودھیا IAST Ayodhyā) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... Mithila (Sanskrit: मिथिला, mithilā) was a kingdom in ancient India. ... Lanka is the name given in Hindu mythology to the island fortress capital of the evil king Ravana in the epic Ramayana. ... The Sarayu (also Sarju; Dev. ... The Treta Yuga is the second out of four yugas, or ages of man, in the religion of Hinduism, following the Satya Yuga of perfect morality and preceding the Dvapara Yuga. ... // Introduction Raghuvamsa, in Hindu mythology is believed to be a lineage/race of warrior kings tracing its ancestry to Surya. ... Lakshman Rekha (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मण रेखा), in Hindu mythology, is a line drawn by Lakshmana around their abode, to protect Sita, while he is away searching for Rama. ... The Aditya Hridayam, is a hymn associated with the Sun or Surya and was recited by the great sage Agastya to Rama on the battlefield before fighting with Ravana. ... Oshadhiparvata, that is the mountain of medicinal herbs, was a mythical mountain described in the Ramayana. ... Sundara Kanda is a book of almost unbelievable spiritual quality which is reputed by its readers to be virtually death defying. ... Pushpaka Vimana in Hindu mythology was a vehicle that could fly in the air. ... In Hindu mythology, Vedavati is speculated to have been the spirit of Sita Devi, the wife of Rama in the epic Ramayana. ... Vanara is a Sanskrit word literally meaning monkey or inhabitants of forests=like the primitive tribes (probably vaanar as pronounced in hindi). ...

Hinduism | Hindu mythology | Indian epic poetry
Female Deities: Devi | Saraswati | Lakshmi | Dakshayani | Gayatri | Parvati | Durga | Shakti | Kali | Sita | Radha | Mahavidya | more...
Male Deities: Deva |Brahma | Vishnu | Shiva | Rama | Krishna | Ganesha | Murugan | Hanuman | Indra | Surya | more...
Texts: Vedas | Upanishads | Puranas | Ramayana | Mahabharata | Rigveda
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Sita (56 words)
As Rama was an incarnation of Vishnu, so Sita was an incarnation of Lakshmi or Sri.
In the Vedas, Sita is "the Furrow", the personified goddess of the female principle of fertility.
Article "Sita" created on 27 August 1997; last modified on 19 November 1997 (Revision 2).
Sita (638 words)
'A furrow.' In the Veda, Sita is the furrow, or husbandry personified, and worshipped as a deity presiding over agriculture and fruits.
She is said to have lived before in the Krita age as Vedavati, and to be in reality the goddess Lakshmi in human form, born in the world for bringing about the destruction of Ravana, the Rakshasa king of Lanka, who was invulnerable to ordinary means, but doomed to die on account of a woman.
Sita became the wife of Rama, who won her by bending the great bow of Siva.
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