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Encyclopedia > Siren
The Siren, by John William Waterhouse (circa 1900).
The Siren, by John William Waterhouse (circa 1900).

In Greek mythology the Sirens (Greek singular: Σειρήν Seirḗn; Greek plural: Σειρῆνες Seirênes) were three dangerous bird-women, portrayed as seductresses, who lived on an island called Sirenum scopuli. In some later, rationalized traditions the literal geography of the "flowery" island of Anthemoessa, or Anthemusa,[1] is fixed: sometimes on Cape Pelorum at others in the Sirenusian islands near Paestum, or in Capreae[2] All locations were surrounded by cliffs and rocks. Seamen who sailed near were decoyed with the Sirens' enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast. Though they lured mariners, the sirens were not sea deities. There are a few possible meanings for Siren: Siren, the mythological creature Siren (amphibian), a type of salamander Sirenia, an order of aquatic mammals including the dugong and the manatee Siren (noisemaker), devices to sound an alarm or used as a musical instrument Siren, Wisconsin, a village in the United... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... John William Waterhouse. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... In Greek mythology, the Sirenum scopuli were three small rocky islands where the Sirens lived and lured sailors to their deaths. ... Paestum is the classical Roman name of a major Graeco-Roman city in the Campania region of Italy. ... For other uses, see Capri (disambiguation). ... The motif of harmful sensation refers to the physical or mental damage that a person suffers merely by experiencing what should normally be a benign sensation. ...


When the Sirens were given a parentage they were considered the daughters of the river god Achelous, fathered upon Terpsichore, Melpomene, Sterope, or Chthon, the Earth, in Euripides' Helen 167, where Helen in her anguish calls upon "Winged maidens, virgins, daughters of the Earth". Roman writers linked the sirens more closely to the sea, as daughters of Phorcys.[3] Homer says nothing of their origin or names, but gives the number of the Sirens as two [Odyssey, 12:52]. Later writers mention both their names and number; some state that there were three, Peisinoe, Aglaope, and Thelxiepeia (Tzetzes, ad Lycophron 7l2) or Parthenope, Ligeia, and Leucosia (Eustathius, loc. cit.; Strabo v. §246, 252 ; Servius' commentary on Virgil's Georgics iv. 562). Eustathius (Commentaries §1709) states that they were two, Aglaopheme and Thelxiepeia. Their number is variously reported[citation needed] as between two and five, and their individual names as Thelxiepeia/Thelxiope/Thelxinoe, Molpe, Aglaophonos/Aglaope, Pisinoe/Peisinoë, Parthenope, Ligeia, Leucosia, Raidne, and Teles. Achelous was often reduced to a bearded mask, an inspiration for the medieval Green Man. ... Terpsichore, Muse of Music and Dance, oil on canvas by Jean-Marc Nattier 1739 Terpsichore holding an Aeolian harp. ... Hesiod and the Muse, 1891 - Oil on canvas, Musee dOrsay, Paris Gustave Moreau. ... Sterope was the name of several individuals in Greek mythology: Sterope, daughter of Pleuron and Xanthippe Sterope, daughter of Porthaon and Euryte, sometimes said to be the mother of the Sirens by Achelous Sterope (or Asterope), one of the Pleiades and the wife of Oenomaus (or his mother by Ares... Chthon may mean: Chthon (comics), a demon in the Marvel Comics universe Chthon (novel), a science fiction novel by Piers Anthony (*see Amazom. ... A statue of Euripides. ... Helen is a drama by Euripides, probably first produced in 412 BC for the Dionysia. ... Phorcys and Ceto, Mosaic, Late Roman, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was one of the names of the Old One of the Sea, the primeval sea god, who, according to Hesiod, was the son of Pontus and Gaia. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... John Tzetzes, (c. ...

Contents

Sirens and death

According to Ovid (Metamorphoses V, 551) they were the companions of young Persephone and were given wings by Demeter[4] to search for Persephone when she was abducted. Their song is continually calling on Persephone. The term "siren song" refers to an appeal that is hard to resist but that, if heeded, will lead to a bad result. Later writers have inferred that the Sirens were anthropophagous, (cannibals) based on Circe's description of them "lolling there in their meadow, round them heaps of corpses rotting away, rags of skin shriveling on their bones" (Fagles' translation). Jane Ellen Harrison notes "It is strange and beautiful that Homer should make the Sirens appeal to the spirit, not to the flesh"[5] for the matter of the siren song is a promise to Odysseus of mantic truths, with a false promise of living to tell them, they sing, For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... Anthropophagy can refer to: human cannibalism human consumption (that is, the tendency of certain animals, such as leeches or trichinae, to eat or similarly harm humans) The word derives from Greek anthropos, man + phagein, to eat. Category: ... Jane Ellen Harrison (September 9, 1850–April 5, 1928) was a ground-breaking English classical scholar and feminist. ...

"once he hears to his heart's content, sails on, a wiser man.
We know all the pains that the Greeks and Trojans once endured
on the spreading plain of Troy when the gods willed it so—
all that comes to pass on the fertile earth, we know it all![6]

"They are mantic creatures like the Sphinx with whom they have much in common, knowing both the past and the future," Harrison observed. "Their song takes effect at midday, in a windless calm. The end of that song is death."[7] That the sailor's flesh is rotting away, though, would suggest it has not been eaten. It has been suggested that, with their feathers stolen, their divine nature kept them alive, but unable to provide for their visitors, who starved to death by refusing to leave.[8] For other uses, see Sphinx (disambiguation). ...


Appearance

Statue of a melusina in Warsaw.
Statue of a melusina in Warsaw.

Sirens, like harpies, partake of women and of birds, in various ways. In early Greek art sirens were represented as birds with large women's heads, bird feathers and scaly feet and sometimes[citation needed] manes of lions. Later, they were represented as female figures with the legs of birds, with or without wings playing a variety of musical instruments, especially harps. The tenth century Byzantine encyclopedia Suda[9] says that from their chests up Sirens had the form of sparrows, below they were women, or, alternatively, that they were little birds with women's faces. Birds were chosen because of their characteristic, beautiful voices. Later Sirens were sometimes also depicted as beautiful women, whose bodies, not only their voices, are seductive. The fact that in Spanish, French, Italian, Polish, Romanian or Portuguese, the word for mermaid are respectively Sirena, Sirène, Sirena, Syrena, Sirenă and Sereia creates visual confusion, so that sirens are even represented as mermaids. "The sirens, though they sing to mariners, are not sea-maidens," Harrison cautions; "they dwell on an island in a flowery meadow."[10] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (700x992, 632 KB) This image was copied from wikipedia:pl. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (700x992, 632 KB) This image was copied from wikipedia:pl. ... Melusines secret discovered, from One of sixteen paintings by Guillebert de Mets circa 1410. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Harpies (robbers) were first beautiful winged women: Hesiod (Theogony) calls them as two lovely-haired creatures. ... Suda (Σουδα or alternatively Suidas) is a massive 10th century Byzantine Greek historical encyclopædia of the ancient Mediterranean world. ... For other uses, see Mermaid (disambiguation). ...


The first century Roman historian Pliny the Elder discounted sirens as pure fable, "although Dinon, the father of Clearchus, a celebrated writer, asserts that they exist in India, and that they charm men by their song, and, having first lulled them to sleep, tear them to pieces."[11] Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Dinon or Deinon (Greek or ) of Colophon (c. ... Clearchus, the son of Rhamphias, was a Spartan general and mercenary. ...


In his Notebooks Leonardo da Vinci wrote of the siren, "The siren sings so sweetly that she lulls the mariners to sleep; then she climbs upon the ships and kills the sleeping mariners." “Da Vinci” redirects here. ...


In 1917, Franz Kafka wrote in The Silence of the Sirens: Kafka redirects here. ...


Now the Sirens have a still more fatal weapon than their song, namely their silence. And though admittedly such a thing never happened, it is still conceivable that someone might possibly have escaped from their singing; but from their silence certainly never.

The "Siren" of Canosa
The "Siren" of Canosa

The so-called "Siren" of Canosa, a site in Apulia that was part of Magna Graecia, accompanied the deceased among grave goods in a burial and seems to have some psychopomp characteristics, guiding the dead on the after-life journey. The cast terracotta figure bears traces of its original white pigment. The woman bears the feet and the wings and tail of a bird. It is conserved in the National Archaeological Museum of Spain, in Madrid. Canosa should not be confused with Canossa in northern Italy. ... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ... In archaeology and anthropology grave goods are the items interred along with the body. ... This is an article about the mythology of the Psychopomp. ... The National Archaeological Museum (Spanish: Museo Arqueológico Nacional) of Spain is in Madrid, beside the Plaza de Colón (Columbus Square), sharing its building with the National Library. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ...


Encounters with the Sirens

Odysseus and the Sirens, eponymous vase of the Siren Painter, ca. 480-470 BC, (British Museum)
Odysseus and the Sirens, eponymous vase of the Siren Painter, ca. 480-470 BC, (British Museum)

In Argonautica (4.891-919) Jason had been warned by Chiron that Orpheus would be necessary in his journey. When Orpheus heard their voices, he drew out his lyre and played his music more beautifully than they, drowning out their voices. One of the crew, however, the sharp-eared hero Butes, heard the song and leapt into the sea, but he was caught up and carried safely away by the goddess Aphrodite. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2500x1750, 2675 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Siren Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2500x1750, 2675 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Siren Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... London museum | name = British Museum | image = British Museum from NE 2. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... This article is about the hero from Greek mythology. ... Chiron and Achilles In Greek mythology, Chiron (hand) — sometimes transliterated Cheiron or rarely Kiron — was held as the superlative centaur among his brethren. ... For other uses, see Orpheus (disambiguation). ... “Lyres” redirects here. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ...


Odysseus was curious as to what the Sirens sounded like, so, on Circe's advice, he had all his sailors plug their ears with beeswax and tie him to the mast. He ordered his men to leave him tied to the mast, no matter how much he would beg. When he heard their beautiful song, he ordered the sailors to untie him but they stuck to their orders (or they couldn't hear him). When they had passed out of earshot, Odysseus demonstrated with his frowns to be released (Odyssey XII, 39). For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... Circe, a painting by John William Waterhouse. ... For the rock song by Nirvana, see Beeswax (song). ... This article is about the musical composition. ... This article is about Homers epic poem. ...


Some post-Homeric authors state that the Sirens were fated to die if someone heard their singing and escaped them, and that after Odysseus passed by they therefore flung themselves into the water and perished.[12] A varying tradition[citation needed] associates this event with their encounter with Jason, though the incident does not appear in Apollonius Rhodius's Argonautica. Many scholars[who?] believe the above vase depicts a drowning attempt on the part of one of the Sirens. Apollonius of Rhodes, also known as Apollonius Rhodius (Latin; Greek Apollōnios Rhodios), early 3rd century BC - after 246 BC, was an epic poet, scholar, and director of the Library of Alexandria. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ...


It is also said that Hera, queen of the gods, persuaded the Sirens to enter a singing contest with the Muses. The Muses won the competition and then plucked out all of the Sirens' feathers and made crowns out of them. For the rock band, see Muse (band). ...

Odysseus and the Sirens. An 1891 painting by John William Waterhouse.
Odysseus and the Sirens. An 1891 painting by John William Waterhouse.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1296x641, 198 KB) John William Waterhouse (1849-1917), Ulysses and the Sirens (1891). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1296x641, 198 KB) John William Waterhouse (1849-1917), Ulysses and the Sirens (1891). ... John William Waterhouse. ...

In Christian thought

By the fourth century, when pagan beliefs gave way to Christianity, belief in literal sirens was discouraged. Although Jerome, who produced the Latin Vulgate version of the Scriptures, used the word "sirens" to translate Hebrew tenim (jackals) in Isaiah 13:22, and also to translate a word for "owls" in Jeremiah 50:39, this was explained by writers of Church doctrine such as Ambrose to be a mere symbol or allegory for worldly temptations, and not an endorsement of the Greek myth[13]. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Jerome (disambiguation). ... The Vulgate Bible is an early 5th century version in Latin, partly revised and partly translated by Jerome on the orders of Pope Damasus I in 382. ... For other uses, see Ambrose (disambiguation). ...


Sirens continued to be used as a symbol for temptation regularly throughout Christian art of the medieval era; however, in the 17th century, some Jesuit writers began to assert their actual existence, including Cornelius a Lapide, Antonio de Lorea, and Athanasius Kircher, who argued that compartments must have been built for them aboard Noah's Ark[14]. The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Cornelius Cornelii a Lapide (Cornelis Cornelissen van den Steen) (b. ... Athanasius Kircher ( ) (sometimes erroneously spelled Kirchner) was a 17th century German Jesuit scholar who published around 40 works, most notably in the fields of oriental studies, geology and medicine. ... This article is about the vessel described in the Hebrew scriptures. ...


In popular culture

As with many mythological creatures, sirens are directly featured in many artistic works and get passing mentions in many more. For creatures that are wholly fictional creations, see Category:Fictional species. ...


Selected examples

In modern literature, mythological sirens have influenced everything from plant names (for example, a carnivorous plant by the same name in Terry Brooks' Shannara series) to comic book characters (Marvel Comics' superhero Siryn). In television, sirens have appeared in shows ranging from sci-fi (the BBC comedy Red Dwarf episode Psirens) and fantasy (an episode of Charmed titled "Siren Song") to action (the Batman TV series episode 97, featuring The Siren played by Joan Collins) genres. The popularity of siren characters extends to films as well with sirens being the main focus of John Duigan's Sirens (1994) and appearing in the 2000 film O Brother, Where Art Thou? (the latter drawing particularly on the myth of Odysseus and the sirens). For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... Nepenthes mirabilis in flower, growing on a road cut in Palau Carnivorous plants (sometimes called insectivorous plants) are plants that derive some or most of their nutrients (but not energy) from trapping and consuming animals or protozoans, most focusing on insects and other arthropods. ... Terence Dean Terry Brooks (born January 8, 1944) is a writer of fantasy fiction. ... This article is about the fantasy series. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Siryn (Theresa Rourke Cassidy) is a Marvel Comics superhero, associated with the X-Men. ... Sci-fi is an abbreviation for science fiction. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British sitcom. ... Psirens was the first epsiode to air in the sixth series of Red Dwarf. ... For other uses, see Charm. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Joan Henrietta Collins OBE (born 23 May 1933) is a Golden Globe Award winning British actress and bestselling author. ... John Lawless Duigan, (born June 19, 1949 in Hampshire, England) is a film director. ... Sirens is a 1994 film written and directed by John Duigan and set in Australia between the two World Wars. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For the film soundtrack, see O Brother, Where Art Thou? (soundtrack). ...


The idea of the lure of the siren also features in the lyrics and composition of many musical pieces such as Erasure's Siren Song, numerous variations of Song to the Siren, Savatage's song and album Sirens, Nightwish's song and single, 'The Siren' and New Order's album Waiting for the Sirens Call. Due to the bewitching powers suggested by the traditional mythology, sirens also tend to be used as characters in computer and video games such as the Final Fantasy series, the video game series Star Control's species "Syreens" and many others. Look up lyrics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the a musical group Erasure. ... Chorus, Erasures fifth proper studio album, was released by Mute Records in the UK and Sire Records in the U.S. in 1991 (see 1991 in music). ... Song to the Siren is the first The Chemical Brothers single released under the name The Dust Brothers. ... Savatage is a progressive heavy metal band founded by the brothers Jon and Criss Oliva in 1979. ... Sirens is Savatages debut album. ... Nightwish is a Finnish metal band, formed in 1996 in the town of Kitee, Finland. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... The Siren was the third single of the album Once by Nightwish. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... Waiting For The Sirens Call is the title of the 2005 album by New Order; their first on Warner Records. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... This article is about the British magazine covering computer and video games. ... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ... The Star Control series is a trilogy of computer games with a cult following. ... Spoiler warning: The Syreen are a fictional race of beings featured in the sci-fi Star Control computer game series. ...


Sirens also appeared in the animated film Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas. They did not, however, appear as a half-woman half-bird creature, nor mermaids but as water, shaped into the body of beautiful women. They seemed also to be capable of controlling the water around them. The story nevertheless retained sirens' ability to lure sailors to their deaths by song; women however remained unaffected by the sirens' singing. Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas is an animated movie produced by DreamWorks SKG and released in 2003. ...


As a classical image the sirens and their story have been reproduced in countless sculptures, engravings and other works of art throughout history, including the paintings by John William Waterhouse which accompany this article. The image remains popular and iconic in a woodcut rendition (reproduced as a logo) representing the global coffee company Starbucks. John William Waterhouse. ... For other uses of Starbuck, see Starbuck. ...


See also

Harpy (from Latin: Harpyia, Greek: Άρπυια, Harpuia, pl. ... For other uses, see Mermaid (disambiguation). ... A cecaelia (pronounced as seh-SAY-lee-ahh; though unrelated to the Latin-originated name Cecilia) is a composite mythical being, appearing occasionally in art and literature (notably from Japan), combining the head, arms and torso of a woman (more rarely a man) and, from the lower torso down, the... Melusines secret discovered, from One of sixteen paintings by Guillebert de Mets circa 1410. ... This article is about the banshee of Irish folklore. ... The Pincoya, Goddess of the Chiloean Seas, with a long head of hair, incomparable beauty, cheerful and sensual, rises from the depths of the sea. ... A Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893. ... Strömkarlen from 1884 by Ernst Josephson has formed many modern Swedes view of Näcken. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... The Rock of Lorelei by the Rhine Lorelei Lorelei Loreley sign on the bank of the Rhine View of the Rhine as seen by Lorelei The Lorelei (originally written as Loreley) is a rock on the eastern bank of the Rhine near St. ... The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland Length 1. ... A water sprite (also called a water fairy or water faery) is a general term for a legendary creature, an elemental spirit associated with water, according to alchemist Paracelsus. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In mythology and fiction (usually fantasy and science fiction) bird people are a race of people who resemble, or who are evolved from, birds. ... A huldra and Näcken. ... El Trauco, according to the traditional mythology of Chiloé, is a kind of hideous deformed dwarf who lives in the deep forests. ... It has been suggested that Fire siren be merged into this article or section. ... The Coat of Arms of Warsaw consists of a syrenka in a red field. ... Rusalka may refer to: Rusalkas, Slavic water nymphs. ... There are a few possible meanings for Siren: Siren, the mythological creature Siren (amphibian), a type of salamander Sirenia, an order of aquatic mammals including the dugong and the manatee Siren (noisemaker), devices to sound an alarm or used as a musical instrument Siren, Wisconsin, a village in the United... The Sirens of TI is a free nightly show provided by the Treasure Island Hotel and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada. ...

References

  1. ^ "We must steer clear of the Sirens, their enchanting song, their meadow starred with flowers" is Robert Fagles' rendering of lines in Odyssey XI.
  2. ^ Strabo i. p. 22 ; Eustathius of Thessalonica's Homeric commentaries §1709 ; Servius I.e.
  3. ^ Virgil. V. 846; Ovid XIV, 88.
  4. ^ Ovid has asked rhetorically "Whence came these feathers and these feet of birds?" "Ovid's aetiology is of course beside the mark," Jane Ellen Harrison observed; the Keres, the Sphinx and even archaic representations of Athena are winged; so is Eos and some Titans in the Gigantomachy reliefs on the Great Altar of Pergamon; Eros is often winged, and the Erotes.
  5. ^ Harrison, "The Ker as siren", Prolegomenma to the Study of Greek Religion (3rd ed. 1922:197-207) p 197.
  6. ^ Fagles' translation.
  7. ^ Harrison 199.
  8. ^ liner notes to Fresh Aire VI by Jim Shey, Classics Department, University of Wisconsin
  9. ^ Suda on-line
  10. ^ Harrison 198f.
  11. ^ Pliny's Natural History 10:70.
  12. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 141; Lycophron, Alexandra 712 ff.
  13. ^ Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, Bk 3, Chap. 1, 4
  14. ^ Kircher's account of sirens in Arca Noë, translated in Literature and Lore of the Sea, 1986, Patricia Ann Carlson, p. 270

Robert Fagles is a Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University. ... Eustathius of Thessalonica (Greek: ) (? - 1198) was a native of Constantinople who became archbishop of Thessalonike. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation). ... This article is about the medical term. ... Keres may refer to: Keres (mythology), female death-spirits in Greek mythology Keres people, Pueblo peoples in New Mexico Keresan languages, languages or dialects spoken by Keres peoples Paul Keres - Estonian chess grandmaster Keres (launcher), an Israeli transporter erector launcher for AGM-78 Standard ARM missiles. ... For other uses, see Sphinx (disambiguation). ... This is the Greek name of the capital of the Hellenic Republic (Greece). ... Eos, by Evelyn De Morgan (1850 - 1919), 1895 (Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC): for a Pre-Raphaelite painter, Eos was still the classical pagan equivalent of an angel Eos (dawn) was, in Greek Mythology, the Titan goddess of the dawn, who rose from her home at the edge of... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... Dionysos attacking a Giant during the Gigantomachia, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... The front of the Pergamon Altar, as it is reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. ... Look up eros, Eros, EROS in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Erōtes or Amores is a Greek dialogue, an example of contest literature, comparing the love of women and the love of boys, preferring the latter. ... Ker or KER may refer to: In mathematics, ker is abbreviation to kernel KER is an airport code of Kerman, Iran See also Kerr This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Fresh Aire VI is an album by Mannheim Steamroller, released in 1986. ... Naturalis Historia Pliny the Elders Natural History is an encyclopedia written by Pliny the Elder. ... Gaius Julius Hyginus, (c. ... Lycophron was a Greek poet and grammarian. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sirens
  • Theoi Project, Seirenes the Sirens in classical literature and art
  • The Suda (Byzantine Encyclopedia) on the Sirens

  Results from FactBites:
 
FilePlanet: Siren | Adventure | Gaming (382 words)
This is an awesome video between GameSpy and a developer of Siren, a game based around a land-locked village in Japan that disappears.
Siren, the upcoming surivival-horror title from SCEI, is no doubt one of the most firghtening games ever created.
Watch as the player successfully navigates a puzzle, where he must avoid an enemy by crawling past a fence.
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