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Encyclopedia > Sir Arthur Wellesley
The Duke of Wellington
Image:Field_Marshal_Arthur_Wellesley_KG_CCB_GCH_CoR_1st_Duke_of_Wellington.jpg
Period in Office: January 1828November 1830
PM Predecessor: The Viscount Goderich
PM Successor: The Earl Grey
Date of Birth: 1 May 1769
Place of Birth: Unknown, possibily Dublin or County Meath
Date of Death: 14 September 1852
Place of Death: Walmer, Kent
Political Party: Tory

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1 May 176914 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman, widely considered one of the leading military and political figures of the 19th century. He came from an established family of noblemen – his father was the 1st Earl of Mornington, his eldest brother, who would inherit his father's Earldom, would be created Marquess Wellesley, and two of his other brothers would be raised to the peerage as Baron Maryborough and Baron Cowley. Commissioned an Ensign in the British Army, he would rise to prominence in the Napoleonic Wars, eventually reaching the rank of Field Marshal. 1st duke of Wellington File links The following pages link to this file: Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington History of the British Army Categories: UK Government images ... January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... November is the eleventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Frederick John Robinson, 1st Earl of Ripon (November 1, 1782 - January 28, 1859), known as Frederick John Robinson (until 1827), The Viscount Goderich (1827-1833), and The Earl of Ripon (1833 onwards), was a British statesman and Prime Minister (when he was known as Lord Goderich). ... Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, (March 13, 1764 - July 17, 1845). ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Dublins Hapenny Bridge. ... Meath (An Mhí in Irish) is a county in the Republic of Ireland, often informally called The Royal County. ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Walmer is in Dover District, Kent in England: located on the coast, the parish of Walmer is 6 miles (10 km) north-east of Dover. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The term Anglo-Irish means British-Irish and is used frequently to describe formal contacts, negotiations or treaties between both states. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington (19 July 1735–22 May 1781) was an Irish politician and composer, best known today for fathering several distinguished British politicians. ... Richard Colley Wesley, later Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley (20 June 1760 - 26 September 1842), was the eldest son of Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, an Irish peer, and brother of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... The Peerage is a system of titles of nobility which exists in the United Kingdom and is one part of the British honours system. ... The title Earl of Mornington was created in the Peerage of Ireland in 1760 for Garret Wellesley. ... The title Earl Cowley was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1857 for Lord Cowley, the longtime British ambassador in Paris. ... In the military of various countries, ensign is a low rank of commissioned officer. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British military. ... The Napoleonic Wars lasted from 1804 until 1815. ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ...


Wellington commanded the Allied forces during the Peninsular War, pushing the French Army out of Spain and reaching southern France. Victorious and hailed as a hero in England, he was obligated to return to Europe to command the Anglo-Allied forces at Waterloo, after which Napoleon was permanently exiled at St. Helena. Wellington is often compared to the 1st Duke of Marlborough, with whom he shared many characteristics, chiefly a transition to politics after a highly successful military career. He served as a Tory Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on two separate occasions, and was one of the leading figures in the House of Lords until his retirement in 1846. The Peninsular War (1808–1814) was a major conflict during the Napoleonic Wars, fought in the Iberian Peninsula with Spanish, Portuguese, and the British forces fighting against the French. ... Organization The French armed forces are divided into four branches: Army (Armée de Terre), including Chasseurs Alpins French Foreign Legion Marine troops light aviation (ALAT - Aviation Légére de lArmée de Terre) engineers (Génie) including Paris Fire Brigade Navy (Marine Nationale), including Naval Air naval... Battle of Waterloo Conflict Napoleonic Wars Date June 18, 1815 Place Waterloo, Belgium Result Decisive Allied victory Map of the Waterloo campaign The Battle of Waterloo, fought on June 18, 1815, was Napoleon Bonapartes last battle. ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français... John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, in his Garter robes John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough (May 26, 1650 – June 16, 1722), in full The Most Noble Captain-General John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, Earl of Marlborough, Baron Churchill of Sandridge, Lord Churchill of Eyemouth, KG, PC (in addition... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

Early life

Believed to have been born in either Dublin or at his family's lands in County Meath, both in Ireland, the third son of Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, his exact date of birth is a matter of some contention. All that exists is a church registry of the event marked a few days after it must have occurred. The most likely date is 1 May, but any day for a few days before or after is possible. He was baptised Arthur Wesley, which was legally changed to Arthur Wellesley in March 1798. Dublins Hapenny Bridge. ... Meath (An Mhí in Irish) is a county in the Republic of Ireland, often informally called The Royal County. ... Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington (19 July 1735–22 May 1781) was an Irish politician and composer, best known today for fathering several distinguished British politicians. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Baptism is a water purification ritual practiced in certain religions such as Christianity, Mandaeanism, Sikhism, and some historic sects of Judaism. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Wellesley was educated at Eton from 1781 to 1785, then moved to Brussels in Belgium to receive further education. In 1787, his father purchased Wellesley a commission as an Ensign in the 73rd Regiment of Foot; he attended the Military Academy of Angers in France, after having received earlier training in England. His first assignment was as aide-de-camp to two successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland (17871793). He was promoted to Lieutenant in 1788; two years later, he was elected as an independent Member of Parliament for Trim in the Irish House of Commons (in 1790), a position he held until 1797. He rose rapidly in rank (largely through the purchase system, which at that time allowed, and, indeed, generally required, officers in the British Army to purchase their rank) becoming Lieutenant-Colonel in the 33rd Regiment of Foot in 1793. He then fought in Holland between 1794 and 1795, and was present at Boxtel. The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (that is, an independent, fee-charging secondary school) for boys located in Eton, Berkshire near Windsor in England, located about a mile north of Windsor Castle. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (Dutch: Brussel, French: Bruxelles, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium and is considered by many to be the de facto capital of the European Union, as two of its three main institutions have their headquarters... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... In the military of various countries, ensign is a low rank of commissioned officer. ... This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, etc. ... An aide-de-camp (French: camp assistant) is a personal assistant, secretary, or adjutant to a person of high rank, usually a senior military officer or a head of state. ... The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (also known as the Viceroy or in the Middle Ages as the Lord Deputy) was the head of Englands (pre-1707) or Britains (post 1707) administration in Ireland. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A Lieutenant is a military, paramilitary or police officer. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... For other meanings, see trim (disambiguation). ... The Irish House of Commons by Francis Wheatley (1780). ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1797 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Official name 33rd Regiment of Foot Nicknames The Havercake Lads The Pattern The Dukes Motto Virtutis Fortuna Comes (Fortune Favours The Brave) Marches Quick: The Wellesley Media: The Wellesley. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Holland is the common name in English referring to the Kingdom of the Netherlands (or exclusively its European part)--although this is incorrect from a Dutch perspective. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1796, after a promotion to Colonel, he accompanied his division to India. The next year, his elder brother, Richard Wellesley, 2nd Earl of Mornington, was appointed Governor-General of India, and when war broke out in 1799 against the Sultan of Mysore, Tipu Sultan, Arthur Wellesley commanded a division of his own. While serving in that capacity, he was appointed Governor of Seringapatam and Mysore, positions he held until 1805. He fought at Assaye, Argaum, and stormed the fortress at Gawilghur. Following the successful conclusion of that campaign, he was appointed to the supreme military and political command in the Deccan; while in that position he defeated the robber chieftain Dhundia Wagh (who had ironically escaped prison in Seringapatam during the last battle of the Mysore war) and the Marathas (in 1803). In 1804, he was created a Knight of the Bath, which would be the first of numerous honours throughout his lifetime. When his brother's term ended in 1805, he returned with him to England. 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... A Colonel is also a non-military honorary title awarded by some U.S. Southern states. ... Richard Colley Wesley, later Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley (20 June 1760 - 26 September 1842), was the eldest son of Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, an Irish peer, and brother of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Mysore is a city in the Indian state of Karnataka. ... Tipu sultans summer palace Tipu Sultan, also known as Tipu Sahib (1750 - 1799) was ruler of the Kingdom of Mysore from 1782, and one of the primary native sources of resistance to the establishment of British rule in India. ... Ranganatha Temple Srirangapatna (British called it Seringapatam) is a small town, 13 km from Mysore in southern India. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of Assaye occurred September 23, 1803 near the village of Assaye in south-central India. ... Gawilghur is the name of very well fortified stronghold of the Maratha Empire. ... Extent of the Maratha Confederacy ca. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... The honours system of the United Kingdom is a means of rewarding personal bravery, achievement or service to the country. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Upon his return to England, Wellesley was elected MP for Rye (in the British House of Commons) for six months in 1806; a year later, he was elected MP for Newport on the Isle of Wight, a constituency he would represent for two years. During this time, he was an established Tory, and in April 1807 (while representing St Michael), he was invested a Privy Counsellor. Additionally, he served as Chief Secretary for Ireland for some time. However, his political life would soon come to an abrupt end, and he would sail to Europe to participate in the Napoleonic Wars. Rye is a small town in East Sussex, England, on the edge of the Romney Marsh. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Newport is the county town and nominal capital of the Isle of Wight, an island in the Solent off the south coast of England. ... The Isle of Wight is an island county off the south coast of England, opposite Southampton. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Guido Renis archangel Michael (in the Capuchin church of Sta. ... This article concerns the British Sovereigns Privy Council. ... The Chief Secretary was the most important position for determining Ireland after the Lord Lieutenant, and was frequently a cabinet level position in the 19th and early twentieth centuries. ... The Napoleonic Wars lasted from 1804 until 1815. ...


Napoleonic Wars

It was in the following years that Wellesley undertook the events that made his place in history. Since 1789, France had been embroiled in the French Revolution, and after seizing the throne in 1799, Napoleon had reached the heights of power in Europe. The British government was casting about for ways to end Napoleon's threat; and Wellesley began to supply them. 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which democrats and republicans overthrew the absolute monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring. ...


First came an expedition to Denmark in 1807, which soon led to Wellesley's promotion to Lieutenant-General and a transfer to the theatre of the Peninsular War. Although that war was not going particularly well, it was the one place where the British (and the Portuguese) had managed to put up a fight on the European mainland against France and her allies. Wellesley defeated the French at the Battle of Roliça and the Battle of Vimeiro in 1808. The resulting Convention of Cintra, which stipulated that the British army would transport the French out of Lisbon, was controversial, and Wellesley was briefly recalled to Britain. In the meantime, however, Napoleon himself had come to Spain, and when the Commander-in-Chief, Sir John Moore, died during the Battle of Corunna, Wellesley was appointed Commander-in-Chief of all British forces in Portugal. 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Peninsular War (1808–1814) was a major conflict during the Napoleonic Wars, fought in the Iberian Peninsula with Spanish, Portuguese, and the British forces fighting against the French. ... The Battle of Rolica was fought on August 17, 1808 near the village of Rolica in Portugal, between the British under the Duke of Wellington and the French under General Delaborde. ... The Battle of Vimeiro was fought on August 20, 1808 and resulted the victory of the British under the Duke of Wellington against the French under General Junot. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Convention of Sintra (or Cintra) was an agreement signed on August 30, 1808 during the Peninsular War. ... Sir John Moore (November 13, 1761 – January 16, 1809) was a British soldier and General. ... The Battle of La Coruña took place on January 16, 1809, between 14,000 British under Sir John Moore, and 16,000 French under Marshal Soult, who was endeavouring to prevent the British from evacuating by sea from the port. ...


Returning to Iberia in April 1809, he defeated the army of King Joseph of Spain (Napoleon's eldest brother) at the Battle of Talavera in 1809. For this, he was raised to the Peerage as Viscount Wellington, of Talavera and of Wellington in the County of Somerset. He proceeded to drive French forces out of Portugal entirely in 1810 to 1811, fighting at Busaco, Lisbon, and Fuentes de Oñoro. In May 1811, he was promoted to General for his services in Portugal. Iberia can mean: The Iberian peninsula of southwest Europe; That part of it once inhabited by the Iberians, who spoke the Iberian language. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Joseph Bonaparte Joseph Bonaparte (January 7, 1768 – July 28, 1844) was the elder brother of the French Emperor Napoleon I, who made him King of Naples (1806–1808) and Spain (1808–1813). ... The battle of Talavera was fought on July 27 and 28 of 1809 and resulted in the difficult victory of the British and Spanish under Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington against the French under King Joseph. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Act of Union in 1801. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of Buçaco was fought by General Lord Wellington on September 27, 1810, to secure his retreat to the Lines of Torres Vedras. ... The Battle of Fuentes de Onoro was fought on May 3 - 5, 1811 and resulted in an undecided battle between French troops under Marshall Andr Mass na and British under Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... This article is about the month of May. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... General is a military rank, in most nations the highest rank, although some nations have the higher rank of Field Marshal. ...


Driving into Spain he defeated the French again at Salamanca, then took Madrid in 1812. Around this time, he was created Earl of Wellington. A French counter-attack that year put British forces in a precarious position, but Lord Wellington was given command of all Allied armies in Spain and created Marquess of Wellington on 3 October. Wellington led a new offensive in 1813, culminating in the Battle of Vittoria, which pushed the enemies back into France and for which he was Promoted to Field Marshal. He invaded France, and finally defeated the French forces at Toulouse; after this battle, Napoleon was exiled to Elba in 1814. The Battle of Salamanca was fought in the Arapiles near Salamanca in Spain on July 22, 1812, and resulted in a Anglo-Portuguese tactical victory under Lord Wellington against the French under marshall Marmont. ... Coat of arms The Plaza de España square Madrid, the capital of Spain, is located in the center of the country at 40°25′ N 3°45′ W. Population of the city of Madrid proper was 3,093,000 (Madrilenes, madrileños) as of 2003 estimates. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in Leap years). ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Battle of Vitoria was fought on June 21, 1813 during the British, Portuguese and Spanish troops, with 96 guns, under The Duke of Wellington, and 58,000 French with 153 guns under King Joseph Bonaparte and Marshal Jourdan. ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... The battle of Toulouse was fought on April 10, 1814. ... See Village of Elba, New York and Town of Elba, New York for the locations in the United States. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Hailed as the conquering hero, Wellington was created Duke of Wellington, a title still held by one of his descendants. He was soon appointed Ambassador to France, then took Lord Castlereagh's place as First Plenipotentiary to the Congress of Vienna, where he strongly advocated allowing France to keep its place in the European balance of power. On 2 January 1815, the title of his Knighthood of the Bath was converted to Knight Grand Cross upon the expansion of that order. Robert Stewart, 2nd Marquess of Londonderry, (June 18, 1769 – August 12, 1822), known until 1821 by his courtesy title of Viscount Castlereagh, was an Anglo-Irish politician born in Dublin who represented the United Kingdom at the Congress of Vienna. ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from October 1, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... January 2 is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ...


On 26 February 1815, Napoleon left his exile on Elba and returned to France. Regaining control of the country by May, he then faced a reformation of the alliance against him. Wellington left Vienna to command the Anglo-Allied forces during the Waterloo Campaign. He ended up in Belgium, along with Prussian forces under Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, and the Anglo-Allied forces fought the French in the inconclusive Battle of Quatre Bras. Two days later, on 18 June, Wellington and von Blücher finally defeated Napoleon at Waterloo. The French Emperor abdicated once again on 22 June, and was spirited away by the British to distant St Helena. February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For information about the legislative programs of Franklin D. Roosevelt, see New Deal. ... Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher (December 16, 1742 in Rostock (Mecklenburg) - September 12, 1819) in Krieblowitz (Silesia), graf((count), later elevated Prince of Wahlstatt, was a Prussian general who led his army against Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. ... Battle of Quatre-Bras Conflict Napoleonic Wars Date June 16, 1815 Place Quatre-Bras, Belgium Result Tactical draw, French strategic win The Battle of Quatre Bras was fought between contingents of the Anglo-allied army and the left wing of the French Army on June 16, 1815 near the crossroads... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... Battle of Waterloo Conflict Napoleonic Wars Date June 18, 1815 Place Waterloo, Belgium Result Decisive Allied victory Map of the Waterloo campaign The Battle of Waterloo, fought on June 18, 1815, was Napoleon Bonapartes last battle. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ...


Later life

Politics beckoned once again in 1819, when Wellington was appointed Master-General of the Ordnance in the Tory government of Lord Liverpool. In 1827, he was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the British Army, a position he would hold for the remainder of his life, except during his premiership. Along with Robert Peel, Wellington became one of the rising stars of the Tory party, and by 1828, had become Prime Minister. 1819 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Master-General of the Ordnance (MGO) was an important British military position before 1855, when its duties were largely abolished. ... Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool (June 7, 1770 - December 4, 1828) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827. ... 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This is about the British Prime Minister. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ...


As Prime Minister, Wellington was the picture of the arch-conservative, though oddly enough the highlight of his term was Catholic Emancipation, the granting of almost full civil rights to Catholics in the United Kingdom. The change was forced by the landslide by-election win of Daniel O'Connell, a Catholic proponent of emancipation, who was elected despite not being legally allowed to sit in Parliament. Lord Winchilsea accused the Duke of having "treacherously plotted the destruction of the Protestant constitution". Wellington responded by immediately challenging Winchilsea to a duel. The duel is also one of the reasons for the founding of King's College London. On 21 March 1829, Wellington and Winchilsea met on Battersea fields. When it came time to fire, the Duke deliberately aimed wide and Winchilsea fired into the air. He subsequently wrote Wellington a grovelling apology. In the House of Lords, facing stiff opposition, Wellington spoke for Catholic emancipation, giving one of the best speeches of his career [1] (http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/terrace/adw03/polspeech/catholic.htm). The Catholic Emancipation Act was passed with a majority of 105. Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity and the Test Acts. ... Daniel OConnell Daniel OConnell (August 6, 1776 – May 15, 1847), known as The Liberator or The Emancipator, was Irelands predominant politician in the first half of the nineteenth century. ... Kings College London (often abbreviated to KCL) in London is the largest college in the federal University of London, with 21,500 registered students. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Battersea Park peace pagoda The bandstand in Battersea Park The cover of Petula Clarks 2001 box set, Meet me in Battersea Park Battersea Park is a 200 acre (0. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity and the Test Acts. ...


Wellington's government fell in 1830. In the summer and autumn of that year, a wave of riots swept the country. The Whigs had been out of power for all but a few years since the 1770s, and saw political reform in response to the unrest as the key to their return. Wellington stuck to the Tory policy of no reform and no expansion of the franchise, and as a result lost a vote of no confidence on 15 November 1830. He was replaced as Prime Minister by Lord Grey. 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the British Whig party. ... Events and Trends United States Declaration of Independence ratified by the Continental Congress (July 3, 1776). ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, (March 13, 1764 - July 17, 1845). ...


The Whigs introduced the first Reform Act, but Wellington and the Tories worked to prevent its passage. The bill passed in the House of Commons, but was defeated in the House of Lords. An election followed in direct response, and the Whigs were returned with an even larger majority. A second Reform Act was introduced, and defeated in the same way, and another wave of near insurrection swept the country. During this time, Wellington was greeted by a hostile reaction from the crowds at the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, and eventually the bill was passed after the Whigs threatened to have the House of Lords packed with their own followers if it were not. Though passed, Wellington was never reconciled to the change; when Parliament first met after the first election under the widened franchise, Wellington is reported to have said "I never saw so many shocking bad hats in my life". During this time, Wellington was gradually superseded as leader of the Tories by Robert Peel; when the Tories were brought back to power in 1834, Wellington declined to become Prime Minister, and Peel was selected instead. Unfortunately Peel was in Italy, and for three weeks in November and December 1834, Wellington acted as a caretaker, taking the responsibilities of Prime Minister and most of the other ministries. In Peel's first Cabinet (18341835), Wellington became Foreign Secretary, while in the second (18411846) he was a Minister without Portfolio and Leader of the House of Lords. The British Reform Act of 1832 (2 & 3 Will. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (LMR) was the worlds first intercity passenger railway operated solely by steam locomotives. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A Minister without Portfolio is a government minister with no specific responsibilities. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ...


Wellington retired from political life in 1846, although he remained Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, and returned briefly to the spotlight in 1848 when he helped organize a military force to protect London during that year of European revolution. He died in 1852, and was buried in St Paul's Cathedral. 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, or just the Commander-in-Chief (C-in-C), was the professional head of the British Army from 1672 until 1904, when the office was replaced by the Chief of the General Staff, soon to become Chief of the Imperial General Staff. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ...


In 1838 a proposal to build a statue of Wellington resulted in the building of a giant statue of him on his horse Copenhagen, placed above the Arch at Constitution Hill in London directly outside Apsley House, his former London home, in 1846. The enormous scale of the 40 ton, 30 feet high monument resulted in its removal in 1883 and the following year it was transported to Aldershot where it still stands near the Royal Garrison Church. 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Constitution Hill is a road in the City of Westminster, London England. ... Apsley House was the London residence of the First Duke of Wellington and is located at Hyde Park Corner; the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1883 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Map sources for Aldershot at grid reference SU8650 Aldershot is a town in the English county of Hampshire, on a moorland 35 miles southwest of London, and is administered by Rushmoor Borough Council. ...

Enlarge
His Grace The Duke of Wellington

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington Project Gutenberg eText 13103: Great Britain and Her Queen, by Anne E. Keeling http://www. ... Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington Project Gutenberg eText 13103: Great Britain and Her Queen, by Anne E. Keeling http://www. ...

Titles & Honours

Peerage of the United Kingdom

The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Act of Union in 1801. ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in Leap years). ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Dukedom of Wellington, derived from Wellington in Somerset, is a hereditary title and the senior Dukedom in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

British & Irish Honours

Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article concerns the British Sovereigns Privy Council. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article concerns the British Sovereigns Privy Council. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A garter is one of the Orders most recognisable insignia. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is a ceremonial official in the United Kingdom. ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A Medal can mean three things: a wearable medal awarded by a government for services to a country (such as Armed force service); strictly speaking this only refers to a medal of coin-like appearance, but informally the word also refers to an Order (decoration); a table medal awarded by... Apsley House was the London residence of the First Duke of Wellington and is located at Hyde Park Corner; the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south. ... The Royal Society of London is claimed to be the oldest learned society still in existence and was founded in 1660. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

International Honours & Titles

October 18 is the 291st day of the year (292nd in Leap years). ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Spanish nobles are classified either as Grandees (also called Peers) or as Titled Nobles. ... December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Order of the Golden Fleece (Ordre de la Toison dOr in French) is an order of chivalry founded in 1430 by Duke Philip III of Burgundy to celebrate his marriage to the Portuguese princess Isabelle of Aviz It was modelled on the English Order of the Garter (Philip... The title Prince of Waterloo is retained by the Dukes of Wellington. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Netherlands (Dutch: Nederland) is the European part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden). ... GCH also stands for the Generalized Continuum Hypothesis, in mathematics of the Set Theory. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Map of Germany showing Hanover Hanover (German: Hannover [haˈnoːfɐ]), on the river Leine, is the capital of the state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Apsley House was the London residence of the First Duke of Wellington and is located at Hyde Park Corner; the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south. ...

Nicknames

Apart from giving his name to "Wellington boots", the Duke of Wellington also had several nicknames. A pair of Wellington boots The Wellington boot, also known as a welly, a wellie, or a gumboot, is a type of boot based upon Hessian boots worn and popularised by Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington and fashionable among the British aristocracy in the early 19th century. ...

  • The "Iron Duke", after an incident in 1830 in which he installed metal shutters to prevent rioters breaking windows at Apsley House
  • Officers under his command called him "The Beau", thanks to him being a fine dresser or "The Peer" after he was created a Duke.
  • Regular soldiers under his command called him "Old Nosey" because of his long nose.

Two dukes, both military officers, were nicknamed the Iron Duke during their lifetimes: Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington Fernando Álvarez de Toledo, Duke of Alva HMS Iron Duke is also the name of three ships in the Royal Navy, one of which is still in active service (a frigate). ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Apsley House was the London residence of the First Duke of Wellington and is located at Hyde Park Corner; the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south. ...

The Duke of Wellington's Government, January 1828–November 1830

Changes The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... John Singleton Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst (1772-1863), Lord Chancellor of England, was a British politician. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst (22 May 1762 - 27 July 1834), the elder son of the second earl. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as Presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Edward Law, 1st Earl of Ellenborough (September 8, 1790 - December 22, 1871) was a British politician. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... This is about the British Prime Minister. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... John William Ward, 1st Earl of Dudley (1781—1833), became the 4th Viscount Dudley and Ward in 1823. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... William Huskisson (March 11, 1770 - September 15, 1830), was a British statesman, financier, and Member of Parliament for Liverpool. ... The Secretary of State for War and the Colonies was a British cabinet level position responsible for the army and the British colonies (other than India). ... Henry Goulburn (1784–1856) was an English statesman and a member of the Peelite faction after 1846. ... The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, PC, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. ... This article is about the Scottish politician. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... A notable office in British government between the 16th and early 19th centuries, the Treasurer of the Navy was responsible for the financial maintenance of the Royal Navy. ... Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville (1771-1851) was a British statesman, the son of Henry Dundas, the 1st Viscount. ... The President of the Board of Control was a British government official in the late 18th and early 19th century responsible for overseeing the British East India Company and generally serving as the chief official in London responsible for Indian affairs. ... John Charles Herries (1778 - 1855) was an English politician and financier and a frequent member of Tory and Conservative cabinets in the early to mid 19th century. ... Master of the Mint was an important office in the British government between the 16th and 19th centuries. ... George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen (January 28, 1784 - December 14, 1860) was a Tory politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1852 until 1855. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British Prime Minister and Liberal politician. ... The Secretary at War was a position with some responsibility over the administration of the British military. ...

  • May, 1828Sir George Murray becomes Colonial Secretary on the death of Huskisson.
  • June, 1828—Lord Aberdeen succeeds Lord Dudley as Foreign Secretary. Aberdeen's successor at the Duchy of Lancaster is not in the Cabinet. William Vesey Fitzgerald succeeds Grant as President of the Board of Trade and Treasurer of the Navy. Lord Palmerston leaves the Cabinet. His successor as Secretary at War is not in the Cabinet.
  • September, 1828Lord Melville becomes First Lord of the Admiralty. He is succeeded as President of the Board of Control by Lord Ellenborough, who remains also Lord Privy Seal
  • June, 1829Lord Rosslyn succeeds Lord Ellenborough as Lord Privy Seal. Ellenborough remains at the Board of Control.

This article is about the month of May. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Sir George Murray (February 6, 1772 - July 26, 1846) was a British soldier and politician, the second son of Sir William Murray, 5th Baronet. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... William Vesey-FitzGerald, 2nd Baron FitzGerald and Vesey and 1st Baron FitzGerald (24 July 1783 - 11 May 1843) was an Irish statesman. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville (1771-1851) was a British statesman, the son of Henry Dundas, the 1st Viscount. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... James St Clair-Erskine, 2nd Earl of Rosslyn (1762–1837) was an English soldier and politician. ...

The Duke of Wellington's Caretaker Government October 1834–November 1834

Other offices were in commission. The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... The Secretary of State for War and the Colonies was a British cabinet level position responsible for the army and the British colonies (other than India). ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... John Singleton Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst (1772-1863), Lord Chancellor of England, was a British politician. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Thomas Denman, 1st Baron Denman (23 July 1779 - 26 September 1854), English judge, was born in London, the son of a well-known physician. ... The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, PC, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. ...


See Also

image:wikiquote without text-35px.png
Wikiquote quotations related to:
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

File links The following pages link to this file: Charles Farrar Browne Definitions of music Edmund Spenser Floccinaucinihilipilification Main Page James Cagney Plautus Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead Thomas J. Watson William Penn Pericles Hyman G. Rickover Julian of Norwich Wikipedia:About Eric Gill Main Page/Temp Virginia Satir Raymond Williams... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Wellington Arch, also known as Constitution Arch, is a triumphal arch located to the south of Hyde Park in central London. ...

References


Burkes Peerage & Gentry is a guide to the titled families of Great Britain and Ireland. ...

Preceded by:
William Elliot
Chief Secretary for Ireland
1807–1809
Succeeded by:
Robert Dundas
Preceded by:
The Earl of Mulgrave
Master-General of the Ordnance
1819–1827
Succeeded by:
The Marquess of Anglesey
Preceded by:
HRH The Duke of York
Commander-in-Chief of the Forces
1827–1828
Succeeded by:
The Lord Hill
Preceded by:
The Viscount Goderich
Prime Minister
1828–1830
Succeeded by:
The Earl Grey
Leader of the House of Lords
1828–1830
Preceded by:
The Earl of Liverpool
Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports
1829–1852
Succeeded by:
The Marquess of Dalhousie
Preceded by:
Viscount Duncannon
Home Secretary
(pro tempore)
1834
Succeeded by:
Henry Goulburn
Preceded by:
Thomas Spring Rice
Secretary of State for War and the Colonies
(pro tempore)
1834
Succeeded by:
The Earl of Aberdeen
Preceded by:
The Viscount Melbourne
Prime Minister
(pro tempore)
1834
Succeeded by:
Sir Robert Peel
Preceded by:
The Viscount Melbourne
Leader of the House of Lords
1834–1835
Succeeded by:
The Viscount Melbourne
Preceded by:
The Viscount Palmerston
Foreign Secretary
1834–1835
Succeeded by:
The Viscount Palmerston
Preceded by:
The Viscount Melbourne
Leader of the House of Lords
1841–1846
Succeeded by:
The Marquess of Lansdowne
Preceded by:
The Lord Hill
Commander-in-Chief of the Forces
1842–1852
Succeeded by:
The Viscount Hardinge


The Chief Secretary was the most important position for determining Ireland after the Lord Lieutenant, and was frequently a cabinet level position in the 19th and early twentieth centuries. ... Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville (1771-1851) was a British statesman, the son of Henry Dundas, the 1st Viscount. ... Henry Phipps, 1st Earl of Mulgrave (14 February 1755 - 7 April 1831) was a British statesman and politician. ... The Master-General of the Ordnance (MGO) was an important British military position before 1855, when its duties were largely abolished. ... Henry William Paget, 1st Marquess of Anglesey (17 May 1768 - 29 April 1854) was a British military leader and politician, now chiefly remembered for leading the charge of the heavy cavalry against dErlons column during the Battle of Waterloo. ... His Royal Highness The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus) (16 August 1763 - 5 January 1827) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son of King George III. From 1820 until his own death in 1827, he was the heir... The Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, or just the Commander-in-Chief (C-in-C), was the professional head of the British Army from 1672 until 1904, when the office was replaced by the Chief of the General Staff, soon to become Chief of the Imperial General Staff. ... Rowland Hill, 1st Viscount Hill (1772 - 1842) was a soldier who served in the Napoleonic Wars as a subordinate to the Duke of Wellington. ... Frederick John Robinson, 1st Earl of Ripon (November 1, 1782 - January 28, 1859), known as Frederick John Robinson (until 1827), The Viscount Goderich (1827-1833), and The Earl of Ripon (1833 onwards), was a British statesman and Prime Minister (when he was known as Lord Goderich). ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, (March 13, 1764 - July 17, 1845). ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool (June 7, 1770 - December 4, 1828) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827. ... The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is a ceremonial official in the United Kingdom. ... James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess and 10th Earl of Dalhousie (April 22, 1812–December 19, 1860) was a British statesman, and a colonial administrator in India. ... John William Ponsonby, 4th Earl of Bessborough also known as Lord Duncannon (31 August 1781 - 16 May 1849) was an English politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Henry Goulburn (1784–1856) was an English statesman and a member of the Peelite faction after 1846. ... Thomas Spring Rice, 1st Baron Monteagle (1790-7 February 1866), English statesman, son of S. E. Rice and Catherine Spring, came of a Limerick family, whose ancestor was Sir Stephen Rice (1637-1715), chief baron of the Irish exchequer and a leading Jacobite. ... The Secretary of State for War and the Colonies was a British cabinet level position responsible for the army and the British colonies (other than India). ... George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen (January 28, 1784 - December 14, 1860) was a Tory politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1852 until 1855. ... William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne (March 15, 1779-November 24, 1848) was home secretary (1830-1834) and prime minister (1834 and 1835-1841) of Britain, and mentor of Queen Victoria. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... This is about the British Prime Minister. ... William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne (March 15, 1779-November 24, 1848) was home secretary (1830-1834) and prime minister (1834 and 1835-1841) of Britain, and mentor of Queen Victoria. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne (March 15, 1779-November 24, 1848) was home secretary (1830-1834) and prime minister (1834 and 1835-1841) of Britain, and mentor of Queen Victoria. ... Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British Prime Minister and Liberal politician. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British Prime Minister and Liberal politician. ... William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne (March 15, 1779-November 24, 1848) was home secretary (1830-1834) and prime minister (1834 and 1835-1841) of Britain, and mentor of Queen Victoria. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne (1780-1863), Son of the 1st Marquess by his second marriage, was born on 2 July 1780 and educated at Edinburgh University and at Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Rowland Hill, 1st Viscount Hill (1772 - 1842) was a soldier who served in the Napoleonic Wars as a subordinate to the Duke of Wellington. ... The Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, or just the Commander-in-Chief (C-in-C), was the professional head of the British Army from 1672 until 1904, when the office was replaced by the Chief of the General Staff, soon to become Chief of the Imperial General Staff. ... Henry Hardinge, 1st Viscount Hardinge (March 30, 1785 - September 24, 1856), was a British field marshal and governor-general of India. ...



Preceded by:
New Creation
Duke of Wellington
Succeeded by:
Arthur Wellesley


The Dukedom of Wellington, derived from Wellington in Somerset, is a hereditary title and the senior Dukedom in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Arthur Richard Wellesley, 2nd Duke of Wellington (3 February 1807 - 13 August 1884) was the son and successor to Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2849 words)
Arthur Wesley (later changed to Wellesley when his elder brother changed his own name) is believed to have been born in either in Mornington House, his family's social season Dublin residence, or at his family's seat of Dangan Castle near Trim in County Meath, both in Ireland.
Wellesley was educated at Eton from 1781 to 1785, but a lack of success there, combined with a shortage of family funds, led to a move to Brussels in Belgium to receive further education.
Wellesley was elected MP for Rye (in the British House of Commons) for six months in 1806; a year later, he was elected MP for Newport on the Isle of Wight, a constituency he would represent for two years.
Peninsular War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4593 words)
Despite his victory, Wellesley was replaced as commander by Harry Burrard, as he was considered too junior an officer to command the newly reinforced expedition to Portugal.
Wellesley pursued and dislodged the French from San Sebastian, which was sacked and burnt.
Wellesley's 55,000 Anglo-Spanish troops were opposed by the 46,000 French of King Joseph Bonaparte, Marshal Jourdan and Marshal Victor near Talavera de la Reina, a town 110 km (70 miles) southwest of Madrid.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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