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Encyclopedia > Sippar

Sippara (Zimbir in Sumerian, Sippar in Assyro-Babylonian) was an ancient Babylonian city on the east bank of the Euphrates, north of Babylon. It was divided into two quarters, "Sippar of the Sun-god" and "Sippar of the goddess Anunit," the former of which was discovered by Hormuzd Rassam in 1881 at Abu-Habba, 16 miles southeast of Baghdad.


Two other Sippars are mentioned in the inscriptions, one of them being "Sippar of Eden," which must have been an additional quarter of the city. It is possible that one of them should be identified with Agade or Akkad, the capital of the first Semitic Babylonian Empire.


The two Sippars of the Sun-god and Anunit are referred to in the Old Testament as Sepharvaim. A large number of cuneiform tablets and other monuments has been found in the ruins of the temple of the Sun-god which was called E-Babara by the Sumerians, Bit-Un by the Semites. The Chaldaean Noah is said by Berossus to have buried the records of the antediluvian world here--doubtless because the name of Sippar was supposed to be connected with sipru, "a writing"--and according to Abydenus (Fr. 9) Nebuchadrezzar excavated a great reservoir in the neighbourhood. Here too was the Babylonian camp in the reign of Nabonidos, and Pliny (N.H. vi. 30) states that it was the seat of a university.


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 EncyclopŠdia Britannica.


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Sippar (504 words)
Coordinates: 33.058829311599° N 44.252153346703° E Sippar (modern Tell Abu Habbah, Sumerian Zimbir "bird city") was an ancient Babylonian city on the east bank of the Euphrates, some 60 km north of Babylon.
It was divided into two quarters, "Sippar of the Sun-god" and "Sippar of the goddess Anunit," the former of which was discovered by Hormuzd Rassam in 1881 at Abu-Habba, 16 miles southeast of Baghdad.
Sippar is thought to have contained the world's oldest bank, the temple of Shamash, which was in operation until at least 1831 BC.
Sippar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (287 words)
Sippar (Zimbir in Sumerian, Sippar in Assyro-Babylonian, coordinates: 33.058829311599┬░ N 44.252153346703┬░ E) was an ancient Babylonian city on the east bank of the Euphrates, north of Babylon.
It was divided into two quarters, "Sippar of the Sun-god" and "Sippar of the goddess Anunit," the former of which was discovered by Hormuzd Rassam in 1881 at Abu-Habba, 16 miles southeast of Baghdad.
Sippar is called Sepharvaim in the Old Testament, which alludes to the two quarters of the city by its dual form.
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