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Encyclopedia > Singing
Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten
Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten

Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. Contrary to common thought, air is not expelled with the diaphragm, but is inhaled using the diaphragm and exhaled or expelled, using the abdominal and lower pelvic muscles, as with ordinary breathing. The pitch is altered with the vocal cords. With the lips closed, this is called humming. A piece of music with a singing part, either acappella or accompanied, is called a song; someone who sings is called a singer. Nearly anyone who can speak can sing, since in many respects singing is merely a form of sustained speech. It can be informal and just for pleasure, for example, singing in the shower; or it can be very formal, such as singing done professionally as a performance or in a recording studio. Singing at a high amateur or professional level usually requires a great deal of regular practice, and/or instruction. Top-quality singers will have instruction and training from coaches throughout their career. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (643x932, 83 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Singing ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (643x932, 83 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Singing ... This article is about audible acoustic waves. ... The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying and screaming. ... Bold text This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the anatomy of mammals, the diaphragm is a shelf of muscle extending across the bottom of the ribcage. ... The abdomen (from the Latin word meaning belly) is the part of the body between the pelvis and the thorax. ... Breathing transports oxygen into the body and carbon dioxide out of the body. ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... Laryngoscopic view of the vocal folds. ... Hum is a verb which refers to either: A sound with a particular timbre, usually a monotone or with slightly varying tones, often produced by machinery in operation or by insects in flight, or An action whereby a human vocally produces such a sound, but usually with musically varying tonality. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... A cappella music is vocal music or singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Bathroom singing, also known as singing in the bathroom, singing in the bath, or singing in the shower is a widespread phenomenon. ... Buskers perform in San Francisco A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which one group of people (the performer or performers) behave in a particular way for another group of people (the audience). ... ==Individual Studio== A recording studio is a facility for sound recording. ...

Billie Holiday singing, photo by Skippy Adelman

According to Alfred Alexander (formally an ENT consultant to the Home Office), "a singer is a person of adequate musicality, who is gifted with a voice of such power and beauty that competent judges can recommend singing as a career". Alexander believes that 1 in 50,000 in the UK possess such gifts, which means in England (800,000 births a year average) 16 people are born with such a voice a year, making 500 "first class voices" active in any particular generation (taken as 30 years) at any one time.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... Musicality refers to fitting a dance to the music being played, with the goal of relating the dance to the musics rhythm, melody, and mood. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gifted education. ... For beauty as a characteristic of a persons appearance, see Physical attractiveness. ... In the music industry, Artists and Repertoire (A&R) is the division of a record label company that is responsible for scouting and artist development. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Generation (From the Greek γιγνμαι), also known as procreation, is the act of producing offspring. ...


Singing is often done in a group, such as a choir, and may be accompanied by musical instruments, a full orchestra, or a band. Singing with no instrumental accompaniment is called a cappella. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... This article is about the vocal technique. ...


Classical and operatic solo singers are classified by the tessitura, vocal weight and timbre of their voices into voice types.
Choral singers are classified by vocal range (see also musical range). Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... In music, tessitura (Italian: texture) is a range of pitches compared to the instrument for which it was intended to be used. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... Voice type, often called Fach (pl. ... This article is about choirs, musical ensembles containing singers. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Human voices may be classified according to their vocal range — the highest and lowest pitches that they can produce. ... In music, the range of a musical instrument is the distance from the lowest to the highest pitch it can play. ...


At the highest professional level it is imperative that singers continuously practice with drills, voice exercises and strengthening activities and that without constant practice, a singer's range can be significantly decreased, requiring extra rehearsal to regain the voice's previous capability, much in the same way as any professional level musician must practice constantly with their instrument. However singing is a very natural activity and this kind of intensive practice is not usually necessary for most singers especially outside the field of classical music and where amplification is available, or for semi-professional singers. Human voices may be classified according to their vocal range — the highest and lowest pitches that they can produce. ...

Contents

Techniques

See also Vocal technique.

A vocal warm-up is usually required before the vocal cords are expected to perform at their full potential. Proper breathing technique is also a key factor in singing correctly. There are a number of vocal techniques that a person can use, either when singing or speaking. ...


Human voice is usually considered to have at least three voice registers; ranging from lowest to highest, they are the: chest register, head register, and falsetto. (The whistle register, comprising the highest notes that a human voice can reach, is also often considered a proper register, although individuals who are able to use it well are fairly rare.) Some singers choose to remain in a single range (usually the chest register) throughout a piece, but many will switch between these different ranges in order to produce a wide range of pitches, or even simply for effect. Yodelling is a technique that requires rapidly switching between at least two different registers many times in the same phrase, producing a distinct high-low-high-low sound. Human voice is sound made by a person using the vocal folds for talking, singing or crying. ... The chest register is generalized to be the range of vocal notes below middle C (C4). ... The head register is generalized to be the range of vocal notes above middle C (C4). ... Falsetto (Italian diminutive of falso, false) is a singing technique that produces sounds that are pitched higher than the singers normal range, in the treble range. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Yodeling (or Yodelling) is a form of singing that involves rapidly switching from the chest voice to the head voice making a high-low-high-low sound. ...


Most singing involves shaping the voice to form words, but types of voice instrumental music which use open sounds or nonsense syllables ("vocalizes") also exist, for instance, scat singing and yodeling. Solfege assigns certain syllables to the notes of the scale. For other uses, see Word (disambiguation). ... Voice instrumental music is the term used for compositions and improvisations for the human voice. ... For the computer operating system, see Syllable (operating system). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Yodeling (or yodelling, jodeling) is a form of singing that involves singing an extended note which rapidly and repeatedly changes in pitch from the vocal chest register (or chest voice) to the head register (or head voice), making a high-low-high-low sound. ... Sol-fa redirects here. ... In music, a scale is a set of musical notes that provides material for part or all of a musical work. ...


Vibrato

Vibrato is a technique used by singers (and many instrumentalists. For instance, string instruments that are played with a bow can produce vibrato tones) in which a sustained note actually wavers very quickly and consistently between a very slightly higher and a lower pitch, giving the note a slight quaver. Vibrato is the pulse or wave in a sustained tone. Vibrato is a natural occurrence and "faking" or forcing vibrato can lessen the quality of a voice. Vibrato is a musical effect where the pitch or frequency of a note or sound is quickly and repeatedly raised and lowered over a small distance for the duration of that note or sound. ... A string instrument (also stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ...


Vibrato adds richness to the tone. Faster vibratos are possible without perceived "damage" to the note as the frequency of the note increases; slow vibrato is necessary for low frequencies in order to allow the full waveform to propagate before altering its frequency.


Vibrato is the result of proper breath support. Some singers use vibrato as a means of expression. Many successful artists have built a career on deep, rich vibrato ability. R&B and Pop Diva Whitney Houston is known for her controlled and impressive use of vibrato in her singing, as she is able to speed it up or slow it down depending on the emotion she wants to invoke. Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... For other senses of this word, see diva (disambiguation). ... Whitney Elizabeth Houston (born August 9, 1963) is a six-time Grammy award winning, American R&B singer, soprano, pianist, actress, film producer, and former model. ...


A melisma occurs when a singer switches pitch while singing the same syllable. It is used heavily in baroque vocal music, as well as to a somewhat lesser extent in popular music. Singers especially noted for their use of this are Christina Aguilera, Mariah Carey, Celine Dion, Whitney Houston, Katharine McPhee, Aretha Franklin, Beverley Knight, Leona Lewis and Patti Labelle. In music, melisma (commonly known as vocal runs or simply runs) is the technique of changing the note (pitch) of a syllable of text while it is being sung. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... This article is about the singer. ... Mariah Carey (born March 27, 1970) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, music video director, and actress. ... Céline Marie Claudette Dion OC, OQ, (born March 30, 1968) is a Canadian singer and occasional songwriter and actress. ... Whitney Elizabeth Houston (born August 9, 1963) is a six-time Grammy award winning, American R&B singer, soprano, pianist, actress, film producer, and former model. ... This article is about the singer. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Beverley Knight MBE (born March 22, 1973) is a critically-acclaimed English soul and R&B singer, songwriter, and record producer who released her debut album in 1995. ... Leona Louise Lewis (born 3 April 1985) is an English singer-songwriter who was the winner of the third series of the popular television talent show The X Factor. ... Patti LaBelle (born Patricia Louise Holt on May 24, 1944 in West-Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an multi-grammy winning American R&B and soul singer and songwriter who fronted two groups, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles and Labelle, which changed and birthed a new era of womens music and...


See also

Look up singing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Belting (or vocal belting) refers to a specific technique of singing by which a singer uses his or her chest voice to produce high and powerful pitches. ... Sing-a-long, community singing, group singing, is an event of singing together at gatherings or parties, less formally than choir singing. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Rap redirects here. ... Screaming is a form of vocalization common in certain genres of heavy metal, hardcore punk, post-hardcore and emo. ... Recitative, a form of composition often used in operas, oratorios, and cantatas (and occasionally in operettas and even musicals), is melodic speech set to music, or a descriptive narrative song in which the music follows the words. ... Sprechgesang and sprechstimme (German for spoken-song and spoken-voice) are musical terms used to refer to an expressionist vocal technique that falls between singing and speaking. ... Throat singing, also known in the western world as overtone singing, harmonic singing, or harmonic chant; and many other regional names, is a type of singing that manipulates the harmonic resonances (or formants) created as air travels through the human vocal folds and out the lips. ... A vocoder (name derived from voice encoder, formerly also called voder) is a speech analyzer and synthesizer. ... Voice pedagogy, or vocal pedagogy, is the study of the teaching of singing. ... Voice projection is a strength of speaking or singing whereby the voice is used loudly and clearly. ... Human voice is sound made by a person using the vocal folds for talking, singing or crying. ... Human voices may be classified according to their vocal range — the highest and lowest pitches that they can produce. ...

References

  1. ^ Page 26, Yehudi Menuhin Music Guides - Voice, Edited by Sir Keith Falkner, ISBN 0-356-09099-X

Yehudi Menuhin, Baron Menuhin, OM, KBE (April 22, 1916 – March 12, 1999) was an American violinist and conductor who spent most of his performing career in the United Kingdom. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Singing News: Southern Gospel Music Magazine (405 words)
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Singing News currently offers several items that we feel would be of interest to our Southern Gospel family.
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Singing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (540 words)
Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech.
Air is expelled with the diaphragm as with ordinary breathing, and the pitch is altered with the vocal cords.
Singing is often done in a group, such as a choir, and may be accompanied by musical instruments, a full orchestra, or a band.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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