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Encyclopedia > Sinclair Lewis
Sinclair Lewis

Born Harry Sinclair Lewis
February 7, 1885(1885-02-07)
Sauk Centre, Minnesota
Died January 10, 1951 (aged 65)
Rome, Italy
Occupation Novelist, Playwright, Short story writer
Nationality American
Notable award(s) Nobel Prize in Literature
1930

Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885January 10, 1951) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. In 1930 he became the first American to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, "for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humour, new types of characters." His works are known for their insightful and critical views of American society and capitalist values, as well as their strong characterizations of modern working women. Download high resolution version (472x640, 12 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sauk Centre is a city located in Stearns County, Minnesota. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... This article is in need of attention. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... The short story is a literary genre. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Biography

Boyhood and education

Born Harry Sinclair Lewis in the village of Sauk Centre, Minnesota, he began reading books at a young age and kept a diary. He had two siblings, Fred (born 1875) and Claude (born 1878). His father, Edwin J. Lewis, was a physician and, at home, a stern disciplinarian who had difficulty relating to his sensitive, unathletic third son. Lewis' mother, Emma Kermott Lewis, died in 1891. The following year, Edwin Lewis married Isabel Warner, whose company young Lewis apparently enjoyed. Throughout his lonely boyhood, the ungainly Lewis — tall, extremely thin, stricken with acne and somewhat popeyed — had trouble gaining friends and pined after various local girls. At the age of 13, he unsuccessfully ran away from home, wanting to become a drummer boy in the Spanish-American War.[1] Sauk Centre is a city located in Stearns County, Minnesota. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Grant Salzl has a huge nose full of acne. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000...

Sinclair Lewis' boyhood home. It is now a museum.
Sinclair Lewis' boyhood home. It is now a museum.

In fall 1902, Lewis left home for a year at Oberlin Academy (the then-preparatory department of Oberlin College) to qualify for acceptance by Yale University. While at Oberlin, he developed a religious enthusiasm that waxed and waned for much of his remaining teenage years. He entered Yale in 1903 but did not receive his bachelor's degree until 1908, having taken time off to work at Helicon Hall, Upton Sinclair's cooperative-living colony near Englewood, New Jersey, and to travel to Panama. Lewis's unprepossessing looks, "fresh" country manners, and seemingly self-important loquacity did not make it any easier for him to win and keep friends at Oberlin or Yale than in Sauk Centre. Some of his crueler Yale classmates joked "that he was the only man in New Haven who could fart out of his face". Nevertheless, he did manage to initiate a few relatively long-lived friendships among students and professors, some of whom recognized his promise as a writer.[2] Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Oberlin College is a highly selective liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ... Yale redirects here. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... Map highlighting Englewoods location within Bergen County. ...


Early career

Lewis's earliest published creative work -- romantic poetry and short sketches -- appeared in the Yale Courant and the Yale Literary Magazine, of which he became an editor. After his graduation from Yale, Lewis moved from job to job and from place to place in an effort to make ends meet, write fiction for publication, and chase away boredom. While working for newspapers and publishing houses (and for a time at the Carmel-by-the-Sea, California writers' colony), he developed a facility for turning out shallow, popular stories that were purchased by a variety of magazines. At this time, he also earned money by selling plots to Jack London. Lewis's first published book was Hike and the Aeroplane, a Tom Swift-style potboiler that appeared in 1912 under the pseudonym Tom Graham. His first serious novel, Our Mr. Wrenn: The Romantic Adventures of a Gentle Man, appeared in 1914, followed by The Trail of the Hawk: A Comedy of the Seriousness of Life (1915) and The Job (1917). That same year also saw the publication of another potboiler, The Innocents: A Story for Lovers, an expanded version of a serial story that had originally appeared in Woman's Home Companion. Free Air, another refurbished serial story, was published in 1919. The Yale Literary Magazine, founded in 1836, is the oldest literary review in the United States, and publishes poetry and fiction by Yale undergraduates twice per academic year. ... “Carmel, California” redirects here. ... For other persons named Jack London, see Jack London (disambiguation). ... The first Tom Swift book: Tom Swift and his Motor Cycle Tom Swift is the protagonist in several series of juvenile adventure novels starting in the early twentieth century and continuing to present. ... A potboiler is an artistic work (writing, picture, musical composition, play, film, but usually something written), created only to make money quickly or to maintain a steady income for the artist, thus implying that artistic values were subordinate to saleability. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The term serial refers to the intrinsic property of a series —namely its order. ... Free Air is a novel written by Sinclaire Lewis. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Commercial success

Sinclair Lewis, circa 1930, when he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Sinclair Lewis, circa 1930, when he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Upon moving to Washington, DC, Lewis devoted himself to his writing. As early as 1916, Lewis began taking notes for a realistic novel about small-town life. Work on that novel continued through the summer of 1920, when he finally completed Main Street which was published on October 23, 1920[citation needed]. As biographer Mark Schorer has stated, the phenomenal success of Main Street "was the most sensational event in twentieth-century American publishing history."[3] Based on sales of his prior books, Lewis's most optimistic projection was a sale of 25,000 copies. In the first six months of 1921 alone, Main Street sold 180,000 copies, and within a few years sales were estimated at two million.[4] According to Richard Lingeman "Main Street earned Sinclair Lewis about three million current [2002] dollars".[citation needed] René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Main Street book cover The satirical novel Main Street by Sinclair Lewis was published in 1920. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


He followed up this first great success with Babbitt (1922), a novel that satirized the American commercial culture and boosterism. The story was set in the fictional Zenith, Winnemac, a setting Lewis would return to in future novels. Babbitt is a classic novel by the American novelist and playwright Sinclair Lewis, first published in 1922. ... Boosterism is the act of huge boobs or promoting, ones town, city, or organization, with the goal of improving public perception of it. ...


Lewis' success in the 1920s continued with Arrowsmith (1925), a novel about an idealistic doctor which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize (which he refused). The controversial Elmer Gantry (1927), which exposed the hypocrisy of hysterical evangelicalism, was denounced by religious leaders and was banned in some U.S. cities. Lewis closed out the decade with Dodsworth (1929), a novel about the most affluent and successful members of American society leading essentially pointless lives in spite of their great wealth and advantages. Arrowsmith is a novel by American author and playwright Sinclair Lewis that was published in 1925. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... For information on the UK singer Elmer Gantry, aka Dave Terry, see Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera Elmer Gantry is a 1927 novel by Sinclair Lewis. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ... Dodsworth is a satiric novel written by American novelist Sinclair Lewis, published in 1929. ...


Lewis also spent much of the late 1920s and 1930s writing short stories for various magazines and publications. One of his short stories published in Cosmopolitan magazine was "Little Bear Bongo" (1936), a tale about a bear cub who wanted to escape the circus in search of a better life in the real world.[5] The story was acquired by Walt Disney Pictures in 1940 for a possible feature film. World War II sidetracked those plans until 1947, when the story (now titled "Bongo") was placed on a shorter length as a part of the Disney feature Fun and Fancy Free. June 1936 issue Cosmopolitan is a magazine for women, sometimes referred to as Cosmo, which has been published for more than a century. ... Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Fun and Fancy Free (first released on September 27, 1947) is a feature film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. ...


Nobel Prize

In 1930, Lewis won the Nobel Prize in Literature in his first year of nomination. In the Swedish Academy's presentation speech, special attention was paid to Babbitt. While using his Nobel Lecture as a platform to praise some of his contemporaries –- including, among others, Theodore Dreiser, Willa Cather, and Ernest Hemingway –- he also lamented that "in America most of us -— not readers alone, but even writers —- are still afraid of any literature which is not a glorification of everything American, a glorification of our faults as well as our virtues," and that America is "the most contradictory, the most depressing, the most stirring, of any land in the world today." Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about Svenska Akademien. ... Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American author of the naturalist school, known for dealing with the gritty reality of life. ... Wilella Sibert Cather (December 7, 1873[1] – April 24, 1947) is an eminent author from the United States. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ...


Later years

After winning the Nobel Prize, Lewis would publish nine more novels in his lifetime, the best remembered being It Can't Happen Here, a novel about the election of a fascist U.S. President. Poster for a stage adaptation of It Cant Happen Here, ca. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ...


Lewis died in Rome on January 10, 1951, aged 65, from advanced alcoholism and is buried in the cemetery in Sauk Centre. A final novel, World So Wide, was published posthumously. is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

  • Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home
  • The Palmer House (Sauk Centre)

Bibliography

  • Hike and the Aeroplane, 1912 (as Tom Graham)
  • Our Mr. Wrenn, 1914
  • The Trail of the Hawk, 1915
  • The Innocents, 1917
  • The Job, 1917
  • Free Air, 1919
  • Main Street, 1920
  • Babbitt, 1922
  • Arrowsmith, 1925
  • Mantrap, 1926
  • Elmer Gantry, 1927
  • The Man Who Knew Coolidge, 1928
  • Dodsworth, 1929
  • Ann Vickers, 1933
  • Work of Art, 1934
  • It Can't Happen Here, 1935
  • Jayhawker, 1935 (play)
  • Selected Short Stories, 1935
  • The Prodigal Parents, 1938
  • Bethel Merriday, 1940
  • Gideon Planish, 1943
  • Cass Timberlane, 1945
  • Kingsblood Royal, 1947
  • The God-Seeker, 1949
  • World So Wide, 1951 (posthumous)

Free Air is a novel written by Sinclaire Lewis. ... Main Street book cover The satirical novel Main Street by Sinclair Lewis was published in 1920. ... Babbitt is a classic novel by the American novelist and playwright Sinclair Lewis, first published in 1922. ... Arrowsmith is a novel by American author and playwright Sinclair Lewis that was published in 1925. ... For information on the UK singer Elmer Gantry, aka Dave Terry, see Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera Elmer Gantry is a 1927 novel by Sinclair Lewis. ... Dodsworth is a satiric novel written by American novelist Sinclair Lewis, published in 1929. ... Ann Vickers is a 1933 novel by Sinclair Lewis. ... Poster for a stage adaptation of It Cant Happen Here, ca. ... Sinclair Lewis novel, Gideon Planish, takes aim at less-thаn-honorable fund raising organisations. ...

Quotations

  • "I love America, but I don't like it." (This is almost certainly incorrectly attributed to Sinclair Lewis)
  • "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in a flag and carrying a cross." (This is almost certainly incorrectly attributed to Sinclair Lewis)
  • "This is America - a town of a few thousand, in a region of wheat and corn and dairies and little groves. The town is, in our tale, called 'Gopher Prairie, Minnesota'. But its Main Street is the continuation of Main Streets everywhere."
  • "Advertising is a valuable economic factor because it is the cheapest way of selling goods, particularly if the goods are worthless."
  • "Winter is not a season, it's an occupation."
  • "There are two insults which no human will endure: the assertion that he hasn't a sense of humor, and the doubly impertinent assertion that he has never known trouble."
  • "American professors like their literature clear and cold and pure and very dead."
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Sinclair Lewis
Wikisource has original text related to this article:

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Schorer, M.: Sinclair Lewis: An American Life, pp. 3-22. McGraw-Hill, 1961.
  2. ^ Ibid., pages 47-136.
  3. ^ Ibid., p. 268.
  4. ^ Ibid., pp. 235, 263-69.
  5. ^ Bongo Bear. Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Retrieved on 2008-01-26.
    See also Film Posters and Ephemera and Lewis Manuscripts / Miscellania at the Port Washington Public Library.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Port Washington is a hamlet and Census Designated Place in Nassau County, New York on the North Shore of Long Island. ...

References

  • Mark Schorer, Sinclair Lewis: An American Life, 1961.
  • Richard Lingeman, Sinclair Lewis: Rebel From Main Street, 2002

Mark Schorer, or Marc R. Schorer (1908 - 1977) was an American writer, novelist, critic. ...

Further reading

  • Lingeman, Richard ed. Sinclair Lewis: Main Street & Babbitt (Library of America, 1992) ISBN 978-0-94045061-5
  • Lingeman, Richard ed. Sinclair Lewis: Arrowsmith, Elmer Gantry, Dodsworth (Library of America, 2002) ISBN 978-1-93108208-2
  • D. J. Dooley, The Art of Sinclair Lewis, 1967.
  • Martin Light, The Quixotic Vision of Sinclair Lewis, 1975.
  • Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 31.3, Autumn 1985, special issues on Sinclair Lewis.
  • Sinclair Lewis at 100: Papers Presented at a Centennial Conference, 1985.
  • Martin Bucco, Main Street: The Revolt of Carol Kennicott, 1993.
  • James M. Hutchisson, The Rise of Sinclair Lewis, 1920-1930, 1996.
  • Glen A. Love, Babbitt: An American Life.
  • Stephen R. Pastore, Sinclair Lewis: A Descriptive Bibliography, 1997.

Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Martin Light is a subdivision of the Danish company Martin Professional. ...

External links

Free Air is a novel written by Sinclaire Lewis. ... Main Street book cover The satirical novel Main Street by Sinclair Lewis was published in 1920. ... Babbitt is a classic novel by the American novelist and playwright Sinclair Lewis, first published in 1922. ... Arrowsmith is a novel by American author and playwright Sinclair Lewis that was published in 1925. ... For information on the UK singer Elmer Gantry, aka Dave Terry, see Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera Elmer Gantry is a 1927 novel by Sinclair Lewis. ... Dodsworth is a satiric novel written by American novelist Sinclair Lewis, published in 1929. ... Ann Vickers is a 1933 novel by Sinclair Lewis. ... Poster for a stage adaptation of It Cant Happen Here, ca. ... Sinclair Lewis novel, Gideon Planish, takes aim at less-thаn-honorable fund raising organisations. ... Cass Timberlane is a 1947 film starring Spencer Tracy and Lana Turner, based upon Sinclair Lewiss novel, and directed by George Sidney. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Stories on Sinclair Lewis (3939 words)
Lewis wrote the books were a payment for the debt he owed the library for providing him with so much entertainment and knowledge while he was growing up.
Lewis found himself in the position of the best-selling writer scorned by the literati because of the suspicion that any book that is popular must be artistically defective," said James Lundquist in his book on Lewis.
The presenters agreed Lewis was the leading chronicler the jazz age and the social change that was occurring during the roaring twenties.
Sinclair Lewis - definition of Sinclair Lewis in Encyclopedia (496 words)
Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885 - January 10, 1951) was an American novelist and playwright.
In 1930, Sinclair Lewis became the first American author to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Lewis was innovative for giving strong characterization to modern working women and his concern with race.
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