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Encyclopedia > Simple living

Simple living (or voluntary simplicity) is a lifestyle individuals choose to minimize the 'more-is-better' pursuit of wealth and consumption. Adherents choose simple living for a variety of reasons, such as spirituality, health, increase in 'quality time' for family and friends, stress reduction, conservation, social justice or anti-consumerism. Others choose it for personal taste, personal economy or as participating in sustainable development. According to Duane Elgin, "we can describe voluntary simplicity as a manner of living that is outwardly more simple and inwardly more rich, a way of being in which our most authentic and alive self is brought into direct and conscious contact with living."[1] For the business meaning, see Wealth (economics). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with consumption (economics). ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Family (disambiguation). ... This article is about the television show. ... In medical terms, stress is the disruption of homeostasis through physical or psychological stimuli. ... The conservation ethic is an ethic of resource use, allocation, exploitation, and protection. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... Anti-consumerism refers to the socio-political movement against consumerism. ... Sustainable development is a socio-ecological process characterized by the fulfilment of human needs while maintaining the quality of the natural environment indefinitely. ... Duane Elgin is an author, speaker, educator, consultant, and media activist. ...


Simple living as a concept is distinguished from those living in forced poverty, as it is a voluntary lifestyle choice. Although asceticism may resemble voluntary simplicity, proponents of simple living are not all ascetics. The term "downshifting" is often used to describe the act of moving from a lifestyle of greater consumption towards a lifestyle based on voluntary simplicity. A boy from Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Simplicity Simplicity is the property, condition, or quality of being simple or un-combined. ...

Contents

History

The recorded history of voluntary simplicity, often associated with asceticism, begins with the Shramana traditions of Iron Age India. Buddha and John the Baptist were early ascetics. Various notable individuals have claimed that spiritual inspiration led them to a simple living lifestyle, such as Francis of Assisi, Ammon Hennacy, Rabindranath Tagore and Mahatma Gandhi. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A (Sanskrit) or (Pāli) is a wandering monk in certain ascetic traditions of ancient India, including: Jainism Buddhism Ājīvika religion (now extinct) Mahavira, the 24th Jina, and Gautama Buddha were leaders of their shramana orders. ... The Iron Age in the Indian subcontinent succeeds the Late Harappan (Cemetery H) culture, also known as the last phase of the Indus Valley Tradition. ... Siddhartha and Gautama redirect here. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... Saint Francis of Assisi (September 26, 1181 or 1182 – October 3, 1226) was a Roman Catholic friar and the founder of the Order of Friars Minor, more commonly known as the Franciscans. ... Ammon Hennacy Ammon Hennacy (July 24, 1893 - January 14, 1970) was an American pacifist, Christian anarchist, vegetarian, social activist, member of the Catholic Worker Movement and a Wobbly, and was known for establishing the Joe Hill House of Hospitality in Salt Lake City, Utah and never paying taxes. ... (Bengali: , IPA: ) (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941), also known by the sobriquet Gurudev, was a Bengali poet, Brahmo Samaj philosopher, visual artist, playwright, novelist, and composer whose works reshaped Bengali literature and music in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ...


Epicureanism, based on the teachings of the Athens-based philosopher Epicurus, flourished from about the fourth century BC to the third century AD. Epicureanism upheld the untroubled life as the paradigm of happiness, made possible by carefully considered choices and avoidances. Specifically, Epicurus pointed out that troubles entailed by maintaining an extravagant lifestyle tend to outweigh the pleasure of partaking in it. He therefore concluded that what is necessary for happiness, bodily comfort, and life itself should be maintained at minimal cost, while all things beyond what is necessary for these should either be tempered by moderation or completely avoided. Epicureanism is a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of Epicurus (c. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Epicure redirects here. ...


In North America, religious groups including the Shakers, Mennonites, Amish, and some Quakers have for centuries practiced lifestyles in which some forms of wealth or technology are excluded for religious or philosophical reasons. For more information about Quaker simplicity see Testimony of Simplicity. North American redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Mennonites are a group of Christian Anabaptist denominations based on the teachings and tradition of Menno Simons. ... This article is about Old Order Amish, but also refers to other Amish sects. ... Quaker redirects here. ... For the business meaning, see Wealth (economics). ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... The Testimony of Simplicity is the Quaker belief that a person ought to live his or her life simply in order to focus on what is most important and ignore or play down what is least important. ...


Henry David Thoreau, a naturalist, utopian and author, is often considered to have made the classic non-sectarian statement advocating a life of simple and sustainable living in his book Walden (1854). Thoreau redirects here. ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... For other uses, see Utopia (disambiguation). ... Sustainable living refers to an individual or societys lifestyle that can be sustained with limited exhaustion of natural resources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


In Victorian Britain, Henry Stephens Salt, an admirer of Thoreau, popularised the idea of "Simplification, the saner method of living" (quoted in Peter C. Gould, "Early Green Politics", Pg.22). Other British advocates of the simple life included Edward Carpenter, William Morris and the members of "The Fellowship of the New Life" (Gould, pg.27-8). Henry Stephens Salt (September 20, 1851 – April 19, 1939) was an influential English writer and campaigner for social reform in the fields of prisons, schools, economic institutions and the treatment of animals – he was a noted anti-vivisectionist and pacifist. ... Edward Carpenter in 1875. ... This page is about William Morris, the writer, designer and socialist. ... The Fellowship of the New Life was an organization in the 19th century, most famous for a splinter group, the Fabian Society. ...


George Lorenzo Noyes, a naturalist, mineralogist, development critic, writer and artist, is known as the thoreauvian of Maine. He lived a wilderness lifestyle, advocating through his creative work a simple life of sustainable living and his spiritual reverence for nature. George “Shavey” Lorenzo Noyes was born in Norway, Maine on August 30, 1863 and was the son of Amos Oscar Noyes and Anna Chase Noyes. ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... Mineralogy is an earth science that involves the chemistry, crystal structure, and physical (including optical) properties of minerals. ... Development criticism refers to far-reaching criticisms of modernization and its central aspects : modern technology, industrialization, capitalism and economic globalization . ... Sustainable living refers to an individual or societys lifestyle that can be sustained with limited exhaustion of natural resources. ...


During the 1920 and 1930s the Vanderbilt Agrarians of the Southern United States advocated a lifestyle and culture centered upon traditional and sustainable agrarian values as opposed to the progressive urban industrialism which dominated the Western world at that time. The Southern Agrarians (also known as the Vanderbilt Agrarians or Nashville Agrarians) were a group of twelve American writers and poets with roots in the Southern United States who joined together to publish an agrarian manifesto, a collection of essays entitled Ill Take My Stand in 1930. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Agrarianism is a social and political philosophy. ... The Industrial Revolution is the name given to the massive social, economic, and technological change in 18th century and 19th century Great Britain. ...


From the 1920s to the 1960s, a number of fairly prominent modern authors articulated both the theory and practice of lifestyles of this sort, among them Gandhian Richard Gregg, economists Ralph Borsodi and Scott Nearing, anthropologist-poet Gary Snyder, and utopian fiction writer Ernest Callenbach. Richard Gregg wrote a book entitled The Value of Voluntary Simplicity (1936) and many decades later Duane Elgin wrote the highly influential book Voluntary Simplicity (1981). There are eco-anarchist groups in the United States and Canada today promoting lifestyles of simplicity. In the United Kingdom, the Movement for Compassionate Living was formed by Kathleen and Jack Jannaway in 1984, to spread the vegan message and promote simple living and self-reliance as a remedy against the exploitation of humans, animals, and the Earth. Richard Bartlett Gregg (1885-1974) was an American social philosopher said to be the first American to develop a substantial theory of nonviolent resistance and an influence on the thinking of Martin Luther King, Jr and civil-rights theorist Bayard Rustin. ... Ralph Borsodi (1886 – 1977) was born in New York and spent the earliest years of his life in Manhattan. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Helen and Scott Nearing. ... Young Gary Snyder, on one of his early book covers Gary Snyder (born May 8, 1930) is an American poet (originally, often associated with the Beat Generation), essayist, lecturer, and environmental activist. ... For other uses, see Utopia (disambiguation). ... Ernest Callenbach (born April 3, 1929) is an American writer. ... Richard Bartlett Gregg (1885-1974) was an American social philosopher said to be the first American to develop a substantial theory of nonviolent resistance and an influence on the thinking of Martin Luther King, Jr and civil-rights theorist Bayard Rustin. ... Duane Elgin is an author, speaker, educator, consultant, and media activist. ... Eco-anarchism argues that small eco-villages (of no more than a few hundred people) are a scale of human living preferable to civilization, and that infrastructure and political systems should be re-organized to ensure that these are created. ... Movement for Compassionate Living are a UK based membership organisation promoting veganism and sustainable living. ... Hens kept in cramped conditions — the avoidance of animal suffering is the primary motivation of people who become vegans A vegan is a person who avoids the ingestion or use of animal products. ... Exploitation means many different things. ...


Practice

Some people practice voluntary simplicity to reduce need for purchased services or goods and, by extension, need to sell their time for money. Some will spend the extra free time helping family or others. During the holiday season, such people often perform alternative giving. Others may spend the extra free time to improve their quality of life, for example pursuing creative activities such as art and craft. Alternative giving or virtual giving is a form of gift giving where the donor, instead of buying a gift for the recipient, makes a donation to a charitable organization in the recipient’s name and the organization provides a certificate or card for the recipient. ... This article is about the economic and philosophical concept. ...


Another approach is to look very fundamentally at the whole issue of why we need to buy and consume so many resources for a good quality of life[1]. Though our society often seeks to buy happiness, materialism very frequently fails to satisfy, and may even increase the level of stress in life. It has been said that "the making of money and the accumulation of things should not smother the purity of the soul, the life of the mind, the cohesion of the family, or the good of the society."[2]


The 'grassroots' awareness campaign, National Downshifting Week (UK) [2] (founded 1995) encourages participants to positively embrace living with less. Campaign creator, British writer and broadcaster on downshifting and sustainable living, Tracey Smith says, "The more money you spend, the more time you have to be out there earning it and the less time you have to spend with the ones you love". National Downshifting Week encourages participants to 'Slow Down and Green Up' and contains a list of suggestions for Individuals, Companies and Children and Schools to help them lean towards the green, develop corporate social responsibility in the workplace and create eco-protocols and policies that work alongside the national curriculum, respectively.


Politics

Although some religious and political movements encourage such practices, simple living is apolitical. There is no conflict in living simply and espousing most political theories.


Many Green Parties often advocate voluntary simplicity as a consequence of their "four pillars" or the "Ten Key Values" of the United States Green party. This includes in policy terms rejection of genetic modification and nuclear power and other potentially hazardous technologies. The Greens' support for simplicity is based on the reduction in natural resource usage and environmental impact. This concept is expressed in Ernest Callenbach's "green triangle" of ecology, frugality and health. Green parties around the world are formally organized political parties based on the principles of Green politics. ... The worldwide green parties are committed to the following Four Pillars: Ecology (sometimes Ecological Wisdom or Ecological Sustainability) Social Justice (sometimes Social Equality and Economic Justice) Grassroots Democracy Non-Violence In German, they are known as Die Grünen: ökologisch, sozial, basisdemokratisch, gewaltfrei. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... Genetic engineering, genetic modification (GM), and gene splicing (once in widespread use but now deprecated) are terms for the process of manipulating genes in an organism, usually outside of the organisms normal reproductive process. ... This article is about applications of nuclear fission reactors as power sources. ... “Greens” redirects here. ... Ernest Callenbach (born April 3, 1929) is an American writer. ... Frugality (also known as thrift or thriftiness ) is the practice of acquiring goods and services at minimum cost, achieved via economical restraints or creative measures. ...


Many with similar views avoid involvement even with green politics as compromising simplicity, however, and advocate forms of green anarchism that attempt to implement these principles at a smaller scale than through modern nations, e.g. the ecovillage. This view is often allied with a general critique of globalization as industrial capitalism, colonial imperialism, or a neoliberal "neocolonialism." Such a pairing is not universal among practitioners of simple living, however, who may denounce such obsession with worldly affairs as distasteful or unseemly. Green politics or Green ideologies is a political ideology which places a high importance on ecological and environmentalist goals, and on achieving these goals through broad-based, grassroots, participatory democracy and a consensus decision-making. ... Theory and practice Issues History Culture By region Lists Related Anarchism Portal Politics Portal ·        Green anarchism is a school of thought within anarchism which puts an emphasis on the environment. ... Ecovillages are intended to be socially, economically and ecologically sustainable intentional communities. ... Economic globalization has had an impact on the worldwide integration of different cultures. ... The Industrial Revolution is the name given to the massive social, economic, and technological change in 18th century and 19th century Great Britain. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Benign colonialism be merged into this article or section. ... For the computer game, see Imperialism (computer game). ... For the school of international relations, see Neoliberalism in international relations. ... Neocolonialism is the term describing international economic arrangements wherein former colonial powers maintained control of colonies and dependencies after World War II. Neocolonialism can obfuscate the understanding of current colonialism, given that some colonial governments continue administrating foreign territories and their populations in violation of United Nations resolutions[1] and...


The relationship between economic growth and war, when fought for control and exploitation of natural and human resources, is considered a good reason for promoting a simple living lifestyle. Avoiding the perpetuation of the resource curse is a similar objective of many simple living adherents. Opposition to war has led some to a form of tax resistance in which they reduce their tax liability by taking up a simple living lifestyle. [3] World GDP/capita changed very little for most of human history before the industrial revolution. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... The resource curse or paradox of plenty, refers to the paradox that countries with an abundance of natural resources tend to have less economic growth than countries without these natural resources. ... A tax resister resists or refuses payment of a tax because of opposition to the institution collecting the tax, or to some of that institution’s policies. ...


Technology

Although simple living is often a secular pursuit, it may still involve reconsidering personal definitions of "appropriate technology", as Anabaptist groups such as the Amish or Mennonites have done. People who eschew modern technology are often referred to as Luddites or Neo-Luddism adherents. This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... Appropriate technology is technology that is appropriate to the environmental, cultural and economic situation it is intended for. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Anabaptists (Greek ανα (again) +βαπτιζω (baptize), thus re-baptizers[1]) are Christians of the Radical Reformation. ... This article is about Old Order Amish, but also refers to other Amish sects. ... The Mennonites are a group of Christian Anabaptist denominations based on the teachings and tradition of Menno Simons. ... The Luddites were a social movement of English textile artisans in the early nineteenth century who protested — often by destroying textile machines — against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution, which they felt threatened their livelihood. ... The term Luddite is a political/historical term relating to a political movement during the Industrial Revolution; currently it is primarily used as a pejorative, describing those perceived as being uncompromisingly or unnecessarily opposed to technological innovations. ...


People who practice simple living have diverse views on the role of technology. Some simple living adherents, such as Kirkpatrick Sale, are strong critics of technology, while others see the Internet as a key component of simple living in the future, including the reduction of an individual's carbon footprint through telecommuting and less reliance on paper. Voluntary simplicity may include high-tech components — indeed computers, Internet, photovoltaic arrays, wind and water turbines, and a variety of other cutting-edge technologies can be used to make a simple lifestyle within mainstream culture easier and more sustainable. Kirkpatrick Sale is an author, technology critic (neo-luddite) and tax resister. ... Per capita greenhouse gas emissions A carbon footprint is a measure of the impact human activities have on the environment in terms of the amount of green house gases produced, measured in units of carbon dioxide.[1] It is meant to be useful for individuals and organizations to conceptualize their... It has been suggested that Nomad Workers be merged into this article or section. ... A photovoltaic module that is composed of individual PV cells. ... This article is about the machine for converting the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy. ... Kaplan turbine and electrical generator cut-away view. ...


The idea of food miles, the number of miles a given item of food or its ingredients has travelled between the farm and the table, is used by simple living advocates to argue for locally grown food. This is now gaining mainstream acceptance. Food miles is an expression for the concept that the mileage of food before it reaches the consumer (or the plate) is a potential indicator for the environmental impact of the food and its components. ...


Advertising is criticised for encouraging a consumerist mentality. Many advocates of voluntary simplicity tend to agree that cutting out, or cutting down, on television viewing is a key ingredient in simple living. Some see the Internet, podcasting, community radio or pirate radio as viable alternatives. // Advert redirects here. ... A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ... Community radio is a type of radio service that caters to the interests of a certain area, broadcasting material that is popular to a local audience but is overlooked by more powerful broadcast groups. ... The term Pirate Radio usually refers to illegal or unregulated radio transmission. ...


Economics

A new economics movement has been building since the UN conference on the environment in 1972,[4] and the publication that year of Only One Earth, The Limits to Growth and Blueprint For Survival, followed in 1973 by Small Is Beautiful: Economics As If People Mattered.[5] Limits to Growth was a 1972 book modeling the consequences of a rapidly growing global population, commissioned by the Club of Rome. ... Small Is Beautiful is the title of a series of books by E. F. Schumacher[1]. The original 1973 publication is a collection of essays that brought Schumachers ideas to a wider audience, at a critical time in history. ...


A reference point for this new economics can be found in James Robertson's A New Economics of Sustainable Development,[5] and the work of thinkers and activists, who participate in his Working for a Sane Alternative network and program. According to Robertson, the shift to sustainability is likely to require a widespread shift of emphasis from raising incomes to reducing costs. James Robertson, a British-born political and economic thinker and activist, became an independent writer and speaker in 1974 after an early career as a British civil servant. ...


The principles of the new economics, as set out by Robertson, are the following:

  • "systematic empowerment of people (as opposed to making and keeping them dependent), as the basis for people-centred development;
  • systematic conservation of resources and environment, as the basis for environmentally sustainable development;
  • evolution from a “wealth of nations” model of economic life to a one-world model, and from today's inter-national economy to an ecologically sustainable, decentralising, multi-level one-world economic system;
  • restoration of political and ethical factors to a central place in economic life and thought;
  • respect for qualitative values, not just quantitative values;
  • respect for feminine values, not just masculine ones."[5]

Look up Empowerment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Conservation may refer to the following: Politics and policy Ethical Conservation, Moral or legislative progress toward freedom through advanced conduct - socially, fiscally or otherwise; based on governments and ideas Conservation movement, movement seeking to protect plant and animal species as well as the habitats they live in Conservation ethic in... Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... Ethics is a general term for what is often described as the science (study) of morality. In philosophy, ethical behavior is that which is good or right. ... Qualitative is an important qualifier in the following subject titles: Qualitative identity Qualitative marketing research Qualitative method Qualitative research THE BIG J This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Look up feminine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

See also

Sustainable development Portal

Image File history File links Sustainable_development. ... The phrase alternative society may have been in usage since the 19th century when Karl Marx and Proudhon represented two factions for alternative visions of social change. ... Theory Issues Culture By region Lists Anarchism Portal Politics Portal ·        Anarcho-primitivism is an anarchist critique of the origins and progress of civilization. ... Anti-consumerism refers to the socio-political movement against consumerism. ... Affluenza is a term used by critics of consumerism. ... Childfree is a term used to describe people who neither have, nor desire children. ... Eco-Communalism is an environmental philosophy based on ideals of simple living, local economies, and self-sufficiency (often associated with the ideologies of socialism, communalism, and sustainability). ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Ecovillages are intended to be socially, economically and ecologically sustainable intentional communities. ... Oral contraceptives. ... Frugality (also known as thrift or thriftiness ) is the practice of acquiring goods and services at minimum cost, achieved via economical restraints or creative measures. ... Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. ... Hippies (singular hippie or sometimes hippy) were members of the 1960s counterculture movement who adopted a communal or nomadic lifestyle, renounced corporate nationalism and the Vietnam War, embraced aspects of Buddhism, Hinduism, and/or Native American religious culture, and were otherwise at odds with traditional middle class Western values. ... Broadly defined, homesteading is a lifestyle of simple, agrarian self-sufficiency. ... Intentional living is a term used in a variety of contexts including religious, ethical and values-oriented contexts as well as coaching, personal transformation, and leadership training practices and programs. ... An intentional community is a planned residential community designed to promote a much higher degree of social interaction than other communities. ... LOVOS is an acronym for Lifestyles of Voluntary Simplicity which are oriented to health and sustainability similarly like the LOHAS, but different from these by their critical consumption attitude and criticism of consumerism. ... This article is about the concept of the meaning of life. ... Permaculture Mandala summarising the ethics and principles of permaculture design. ... Religion of Consumerism is a somewhat cynical or derogatory phrase used by some (authors) who have observed the global dominance of consumerism and its negative social and environmental consequences. ... Sustainable living refers to an individual or societys lifestyle that can be sustained with limited exhaustion of natural resources. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Elgin, Duane (1993) "Voluntary Simplicity" p25.
  2. ^ The thoughts of David Shi as summarized in "Voluntary Simplicity" (1993) by Duane Elgin, p53.
  3. ^ Picket Line Annual Report
  4. ^ United Nations Environment Program (1972) Report of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment. Stockholm 1972. Retrieved on March 24, 2008
  5. ^ a b c Robertson, James (2005) "The New Economics of Sustainable Development". A Briefing for Policy Makers. Report for the European Commission. ISBN 0 7494 3093 1

is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Walden (1854), Henry David Thoreau, available at wikisource — key text in simple living.
  • The Value of Voluntary Simplicity (1936), Richard Gregg; a seminal book on the subject of simplicity, heavily influenced by Gandhi.
  • The Simple Life (1973), Vernard Eller, ISBN 0802815375; a perspective on simple living according to Jesus, Kierkegaard and Eller.
  • American Mania: When More Is Not Enough by Peter C Whybrow, 2005 W. W. Norton & Co.
  • More-With-Less Cookbook (Herald Press, 1976), Doris Janzen Longacre, ISBN 0-8361-1786-7 — suggestions by Mennonites on how to eat better and consume less of the world's limited food resources.
  • New Age Politics (1979), Mark Satin, ISBN 0-440-55700-3 — articulates a politics focused on voluntary simplicity and humanistic psychology; builds on two important Elgin articles from the 1970s.
  • Living More With Less (Herald Press, 1980), Doris Janzen Longacre, ISBN 0-8361-1930-4 — a pattern of living with less and a wealth of practical suggestions from the worldwide experiences of Mennonites.
  • Voluntary Simplicity (1980), Duane Elgin, ISBN 0-688-12119-5 — key text in voluntary simplicity.
  • A Simple Choice: A Practical Guide to Saving Your Time, Money and Sanity, Deborah Taylor-Hough, ISBN 1891400495 (SourceBooks)
  • What Are People For? (North Point Press, 1990), Wendell Berry, ISBN 0-86547-437-0
  • Wealth 101: Getting What You Want-Enjoying What You've Got, Peter McWilliams (1992)
  • Your Money or Your Life (1992), Joe Dominguez & Vicki Robin, ISBN 0-14-016715-3 — another classic voluntary simplicity text.
  • Simplify Your Life: 100 Ways to Slow Down and Enjoy the Things That Really Matter, Elaine St. James, ISBN 0786880007 (Hyperion)
  • Self-reliant, Tree-based, Autonomous Vegan Villages (Movement for Compassionate Living, 1996), Kathleen Jannaway.
  • Stepping Lightly: Simplicity for People and the Planet, Mark A. Burch (2000), ISBN 0-86571-423-1
  • Affluenza (2002), John de Graaf et al., ISBN 1-57675-199-6 — popularized approach to voluntary simplicity.
  • What Should I Do If Reverend Billy is in my Store? (2003), Bill Talen, ISBN 1-56584-979-5, more recent anti-consumerism, anti-corporate. Talen gives an account of his activism.
  • The Circle of Simplicity: Return to the Good Life, Cecile Andrews, ISBN 0-06-092872-7 — leading guide for simplicity study circles.
  • Nothing's Too Small to Make a Difference, Wanda Urbanska & Frank Levering, ISBN 0-89587-297-8
  • Simplicity and Success: Creating the Life You Long For, Bruce Elkin, Trafford {2003]
  • Serve God, Save the Planet (Chelsea Green Publishing Company, 2006), J. Matthew Sleeth, M.D., ISBN 1-933392-01-0, religious approach to voluntary simplicity.
  • Living the Good Life. How one family changed their world from their own backyard. (2006), Linda Cockburn, ISBN 1-74066-312-8
  • The Good Life: Helen and Scott Nearing's Sixty Years of Self-Sufficient Living (Schocken, 1970), by "Scott and Helen Nearing".
  • Downshift to the Good Life. (2007), by Lynn Huggins - Cooper ISBN 978-1904902379
  • The Complete Tightwad Gazette: Promoting Thrift as a Viable Alternative Lifestyle." (1998), by Amy Dacyzyn, ISBN-10: 0375752250

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Thoreau redirects here. ... Richard Bartlett Gregg (1885-1974) was an American social philosopher said to be the first American to develop a substantial theory of nonviolent resistance and an influence on the thinking of Martin Luther King, Jr and civil-rights theorist Bayard Rustin. ... Mark Satin fielding a question at the Fall for the Book Literary Festival, Fairfax, VA, USA, September 21, 2004 – photo by Richard Mallory Allnutt Mark Satin (born November 16, 1946) is a U.S. lawyer and editor of the online political periodical Radical Middle Newsletter. ... Humanistic psychology is a school of psychology that emerged in the 1950s in reaction to both behaviorism and psychoanalysis. ... Duane Elgin is an author, speaker, educator, consultant, and media activist. ... Wendell Berry (born August 5, 1934, Henry County, Kentucky) is an American man of letters, academic, cultural and economic critic, and farmer. ... Movement for Compassionate Living are a UK based membership organisation promoting veganism and sustainable living. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Helen and Scott Nearing. ...

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Simple living Summary (2596 words)
Simple living (similar but not identical to voluntary simplicity or voluntary poverty) is a lifestyle individuals may pursue for a variety of motivations, such as spirituality, health, or ecology.
Simple living as a concept is distinguished from the simple lifestyles of those living in conditions of poverty in that its proponents are consciously choosing to not focus on wealth directly tied to money or restrictive, cash-based economics.
Some simple living adherents, such as Kirkpatrick Sale, are strong critics of technology, while others see the internet as a key component of simple living in the future, including the reduction of an individual's carbon footprint through telecommuting.
Simple living - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1674 words)
Although asceticism may resemble voluntary simplicity, proponents of simple living are not all ascetics.
In the United Kingdom, the Movement for Compassionate Living was formed by Kathleen and Jack Jannaway in 1984, to spread the vegan message and promote simple living and self-reliance as a remedy against the exploitation of humans, animals and the Earth.
Some simple living adherents, such as Kirkpatrick Sale, are strong critics of technology, while others see the Internet as a key component of simple living in the future, including the reduction of an individual's carbon footprint through telecommuting and less reliance on paper.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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