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Encyclopedia > Simon Sudbury

Simon Theobald a.k.a "Simon of Sudbury" (d. June 14, 1381) was an Archbishop of Canterbury (1375 - 1381). He was born at Sudbury in Suffolk, studied at the University of Paris, and became one of the chaplains of Pope Innocent VI, who sent him, in 1356, on a mission to Edward III of England. June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... Events June 12 - Peasants Revolt: In England rebels arrive at Blackheath. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... Events October 24 - Valdemar IV of Denmark dies and is succeeded by his grandson Olaf III of Denmark. ... Events June 12 - Peasants Revolt: In England rebels arrive at Blackheath. ... There are a number of places named Sudbury: Sudbury, Suffolk, England Sudbury, London, England Sudbury, Derbyshire, England Sudbury, Massachusetts, USA Greater Sudbury, Ontario, Canada (official name of the municipality; for most purposes the city continues to be known simply as Sudbury) - the city is served by the Sudbury electoral district... This article is about the English county. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... Innocent VI, né Stephen Aubert (1282 - September 12, 1362), pope at Avignon from 1352 to 1362, the successor of Clement VI, was a native of the diocese of Limoges, and, after having taught civil law at Toulouse, became bishop successively of Noyon and of Clermont. ... Events January 20 - Edward Balliol surrenders title as King of Scotland to Edward III of England September 19 - Battle of Poitiers The English defeat the French in the Hundred Years War, capturing the King John II of France in the process. ... Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English Kings of medieval times. ...


In October 1361 the pope appointed him Bishop of London, and he was soon serving the king as an ambassador and in other ways. In 1375 he succeeded William Whittlesey as archbishop of Canterbury, and during the rest of his life was a partisan of John of Gaunt. Events Founding of the University of Pavia, Italy. ... The current Bishop of London is Richard John Carew Chartres, who is the 132nd Bishop, and was installed on January 26, 1996. ... Events October 24 - Valdemar IV of Denmark dies and is succeeded by his grandson Olaf III of Denmark. ... William Whittlesey (or Whittlesea) (d. ... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ...


In July 1377, he crowned Richard II, and in 1378 John Wycliffe appeared before him at Lambeth, but he only undertook proceedings against the reformer under great pressure. Events January 17 – Gregory XI enters Rome. ... Richard II (January 6?, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born at Bordeaux and became his fathers heir when his elder brother died in infancy. ... Events March - John Wyclif tried to gain public favour by laying his theses before parliament, and then made them public in a tract. ... Wycliffe may also refer to Wycliffe Bible Translators John Wycliff (also Wycliffe or Wyclif) (132? – December 31, 1384) was an English theologian and early proponent of reform in the Roman Catholic Church during the 14th century. ... Lambeth Palace Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, located in Lambeth, beside the Thames opposite the Palace of Westminster. ...


In January 1380, Sudbury became chancellor of England, and the insurgent peasants regarded him as one of the principal authors of their woes. Having released John Ball from his prison at Maidstone, the Kentish insurgents attacked and damaged the archbishop's property at Canterbury and Lambeth; then, rushing into the Tower of London, they seized the archbishop himself. So unpopular was Sudbury that guards simply allowed the rebels through the gates. Events September 8 - Battle of Kulikovo - Russian forces under Grand Prince Dmitrii Ivanovich defeat a mixed army of Tatars and Mongols (the Golden Horde), stopping their advance at Kulikovo. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... The Peasants Revolt or Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe and is a major event in the history of England. ... John Ball (d. ... Maidstone is the county town of Kent, in southeast England, about 30 miles from London. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... St Peters St, Canterbury, from the West Gate, 1993 Canterbury (Latin: Duroverum) is a cathedral city in the county of Kent in southeast England. ... The Tower of London, seen from the river, with a view of the water gate called Traitors Gate. ...


Sudbury was dragged to Tower Hill and, on June 14 1381, was beheaded. His body was afterwards buried in Canterbury Cathedral. Sudbury rebuilt part of the church of St Gregory at Sudbury, and with his brother, John of Chertsey, he founded a college in this town; he also did some building at Canterbury. His father was Nigel Theobald, and he is sometimes called Simon Theobald or Tybald. June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... Canterbury Cathedral, N.W., ca. ...


He introduced the Poll Tax in 1380, and the subsequent revolt was echoed when the tax was reintroduced in the 1980s. However, in the twentieth century the government quickly abandoned the scheme. A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica.
The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica ( 1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...

Preceded by:
William Whittlesey
Archbishop of Canterbury
1375–1381
Succeeded by:
William Courtenay
Preceded by:
The Lord Scrope of Bolton
Lord Chancellor
1380–1381
Succeeded by:
Hugh Segrave
(Keeper of the Great Seal)


William Whittlesey (or Whittlesea) (d. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... William Courtenay (c. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Simon Sudbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (333 words)
He was born at Sudbury in Suffolk, studied at the University of Paris, and became one of the chaplains of Pope Innocent VI, who sent him, in 1356, on a mission to Edward III of England.
In January 1380, Sudbury became chancellor of England, and the insurgent peasants regarded him as one of the principal authors of their woes.
Sudbury was dragged to Tower Hill and, on June 14 1381, was beheaded.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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