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Encyclopedia > Silver screen

The term silver screen derives from the type of projection screen used at the start of the motion picture industry and specifically refers to the actual silver (Ag) content embedded in the material (a tightly woven fabric, either natural, such as silk, or a synthetic fiber) that made up the screen's highly reflective surface. For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series Transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Density, Hardness 10490 kg/m3, 2. ... Silk (< OE sioloc probably < L. SERICVS / Gr. ... Synthetic Fibers are the result of an extensive search by scientists to increase and improve upon the supply of naturally occurring animal and plant fibers that have been used in making cloth. ...


Excellent for use with low-wattage projectors and the early projected monochromatic images, the silver screen, or silver lenticular (vertically ridged) screen, however, provides smaller horizontal/vertical viewing angles than its more modern counterparts and tends to color-shift to blue when color images are used, in addition to hot-spotting (the tendency of single source projection to over saturate the screen's center, leaving the peripheries darker). Due to these limitations and the continued innovation of screen materials, the manufacture of silver projection screens was generally phased out, though never fully discontinued, while the term "silver screen" itself continues to be used to refer to projection screens in general and motion picture projection screens in particular. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Something which is monochromatic has a single color. ...


Other projection screen types to come after the silver lenticular screen are the pearlescent screen (which has narrow viewing angles and a higher gain--thus reflects more of the projected light--color shifts to red and tends to hot spot), the glass-beaded screen (which has a higher gain, though due to the nature of its structure, suffers a significant loss of viewing angles and a marked loss of resolution since glass beaded screens are retro reflective, that is, their reflection is directed back to the light source; in addition, the glass beaded screen is physically unstable since the beads can shift, break or break off, resulting in noticeable dark spots), the gray screen (which design, while improving contrast with front projection, results in a color shift to the blue end of the spectrum much as the silver lenticular--ideal for black and white projections but noticeably distorted with color and rendering whites off-white) and the matte white screen (which is generally regarded by those in the screen manufacturing industry to be the finest development in screen technology, providing true color reproduction, the highest resolution capacity, the widest viewing angles, no glare and no hot spotting).


It is the matte white screen which has become the entertainment industry standard.


Silver lenticular screens, however, while no longer employed as the standard for motion picture projection, remain in use as they are ideally suited for modern 3D projection. A 3D projection is a mathematical process to project a series of 3D shapes to a 2D surface, usually a computer monitor. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Silver screen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (583 words)
A silver screen, also known as a silver lenticular screen, is a type of projection screen that was popular in the early years of the motion picture industry, and is still used in projecting 3-D films.
Silver lenticular (vertically ridged) screens, which are made from a tightly woven fabric, either natural, such as silk or a synthetic fiber, were excellent for use with low-power projector lampheads and the monochromatic images that were a staple of early projected images.
Silver lenticular screens, while no longer employed as the standard for motion picture projection, remain in use as they are ideally suited for modern 3-D film polaroid projection.
silver screen: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (611 words)
A silver screen, also known as a silver lenticular screen, is a type of projection screen that was popular in the early years of the motion picture industry.
Silver lenticular (vertically ridged) screens, which were made from a tightly woven fabric, either natural, such as silk or a synthetic fiber, were excellent for use with low-power projectors and the monochromatic images that were a staple of early projected images.
Silver lenticular screens, while no longer employed as the standard for motion picture projection, remain in use as they are ideally suited for modern 3D laser projection.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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