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Encyclopedia > Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II
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Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee and her domestic and international visits proved very popular with her subjects.

The Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II's ascension to the British throne, and was celebrated with large-scale parties and parades throughout the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth in June of 1977; the official "Jubilee Days" were held to coincide with the Queen's Official Birthday. The anniversary date itself was commemorated in church services across the land on 6 February 1977, and continued throughout the month. In March, preparations started for large parties in every major city, as well as for smaller ones for countless individual streets throughout the country. A Silver Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 25th anniversary. ... Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), styled HM The Queen ( born 21 April 1926) is the queen regnant and head of state of Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Canada, Grenada, Jamaica, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent... Flag of the Commonwealth of Nations The Commonwealth of Nations is a voluntary association of independent sovereign states, most of which were once governed by the United Kingdom and are its former colonies. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ... The Queens Birthday or Queens Official Birthday is celebrated as a public holiday in several Commonwealth countries (usually Commonwealth realms). ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ...

Contents

The beginning of Jubilee

On 4 May, both Houses of Parliament presented addresses of loyalty and deference to the Queen. She replied to them and stressed that the year 1977 would finally bring unity to the entire Commonwealth, as was the Jubilee's goal. Immediately after the Jubilee addresses of 4 May, the Queen left Buckingham Palace on a goodwill trip across the country; she wanted to take this time to meet as many of her loyal subjects as time permitted before she needed to come back to London for festivities. May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria memorial. This principal facade of 1850 by Edward Blore was redesigned in 1913 by Sir Aston Webb. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ...


National and international goodwill visits

No monarch before Elizabeth II visited more of the United Kingdom in such a short span of time (the trips lasted three months). All in all, the Queen and her husband Prince Philip visited a total of 36 counties. The trip started with record crowds gathering to see the Royals in Glasgow on 17 May. After moving to England (where a record one million spectators came to greet the couple in Lancashire) and Wales, the Queen and Prince Philip wrapped up the first of their trips with a visit to Northern Ireland. Among the places visited during the national trips were numerous schools, which were the subject of a television special hosted by presenter Valerie Singleton. HRH The Duke of Edinburgh His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten, formerly Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark), styled - HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (born 10 June 1921), is the consort of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... Glasgows location in Scotland Glasgow or Glaschù is Scotlands largest city, on the River Clyde in west central Scotland. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Lancashire (archaically, the County of Lancaster) is a county palatine of England, lying on the Irish Sea. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English(100%), Welsh(20. ... Northern Ireland is one of four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ... A television presenter is a British term for a person who is known for introducing or hosting television programmes. ... Valerie Singleton is a British television presenter, best known for her many years as the female presenter of the popular childrens series, Blue Peter. ...


Later in the summer, the Queen and Prince Philip embarked on a Commonwealth visit that first brought them to island nations such as Fiji and Tonga, following up with longer stints in New Zealand and Australia, with a final stop in Papua New Guinea before going on to the British holdings in the West Indies. The final stop on the international tour was a trip to Canada, in which Prince Charles joined the couple to greet the crowds. The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... HRH The Prince of Wales His Royal Highness The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor) (born 14 November 1948), the eldest son of HM Queen Elizabeth II and HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, is Heir Apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom...


June celebrations in London

On 6 June, the Queen lit a bonfire beacon at Windsor Castle, whose light spread across the night in a chain of other beacons throughout the country. On 7 June, crowds lined the procession to St Paul's Cathedral, where the royal family attended a Service of Thanksgiving alongside many world leaders, including United States President Jimmy Carter, as well as all of the former living Prime Ministers, stretching back from Harold Macmillan all the way to Harold Wilson. The service was followed by lunch in the Guildhall, hosted by the Lord Mayor of London. At the reception, the Queen was quoted as saying, "...when I was twenty-one I pledged my life to the service of our people and I asked for God's help to make good that vow. Although that vow was made in my salad days, when I was green in judgement, I do not regret nor retract one word of it." June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... This page discusses Beacons, fires designed to attract attention. ... An early 18th century view of Windsor Castle by Kip and Knyff. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is a group of people closely related to the British monarch. ... Order: 39th President Vice President: Walter Mondale Term of office: January 20, 1977 – January 20, 1981 Preceded by: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Ronald Reagan Date of birth: October 1, 1924 Place of birth: Plains, Georgia First Lady: Rosalynn Carter Political party: Democratic James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM (10 February 1894 - 29 December 1986), nicknamed Supermac and Mac the Knife, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... The Right Honourable James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, PC (March 11, 1916 – May 24, 1995) was one of the most successful Labour Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom and a 1960s icon. ... The Guildhall The Guildhall is a building in the City of London, off Cheapside near Bank. ... Michael Berry Savory is the current Lord Mayor of London. ...


After the luncheon, the procession drove the royals down The Mall to Buckingham Palace, where an estimated one million people lined the pavements to see the family wave to onlookers. A further 500 million people around the Commonwealth watched the day's events on live television. 7 June was the day that streets and villages threw elaborate parties for all their residents, to honour the Queen and their country's rich history. Many streets strung bunting (the little flags were usually modeled in pattern after the Union Jack) from rooftop to rooftop across the street. In addition to parties, many streets decorated motor vehicles as historical events from Britain's past, and drove them about town, organizing their very own parades. In London alone there were over 4000 organized parties for individual streets and neighbourhoods. During the entire day, onlookers were greeted by the Queen many times as she made several appearances for pictures from her balcony. The Mall, looking towards Buckingham Palace The Mall in London is the road running from Buckingham Palace at its western end to Admiralty Arch and on to Trafalgar Square at its eastern end. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria memorial. This principal facade of 1850 by Edward Blore was redesigned in 1913 by Sir Aston Webb. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Genera Melophus Latoucheornis Emberiza Plectrophenax Buntings are a group of mainly European passerine birds of the family Emberizidae. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The Union Flag or Union Jack is the flag most commonly associated with the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and was also used throughout the former British Empire. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... A neighbourhood (in Commonwealth English) or neighborhood (in American English) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ... A balcony Balcony (from Italian balcone, scaffold; cf. ...


On 9 June, the Queen made a Royal Progress trip via boat down the River Thames from Greenwich to Lambeth, in a re-enactment of the famous progresses taken by Queen Elizabeth I. On the trip, the Queen officially opened the Silver Jubilee Walkway and the South Bank Jubilee Gardens, two of numerous places named after the festivities. In the evening, the Queen presided over a fireworks display and was subsequently taken by a procession of lighted carriages to Buckingham Palace, where she greeted onlookers yet again from her balcony. June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... A Royal Progress was a tour of their kingdom by a monarch and his or her entourage. ... Length 346 km Elevation of the source 110 m Average discharge entering Oxford: 17. ... Greenwich (pronounced or ) is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the river Thames in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Lambeth is a place in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Tourists in a vis-a-vis, Prague The classic definition of a carriage is a four-wheeled horse-drawn private passenger vehicle with leaf springs or leather strapping for suspension, whether light, smart and fast or large and comfortable. ...


The Jubilee in popular culture

Before, during, and after the events of Jubilee, the event was addressed in many mediums of popular culture.


The most infamous event marking the Jubilee was the Sex Pistols' release of the vehement anti-monarchy song "God Save the Queen." The song was seen as an attack on both the royal family (which the Sex Pistols called a "fascist regime") and the United Kingdom as a nation. Originally titled "No Future," the end of the song calls for an end to "England's dreaming," as there will be "no future." On 7 June, the high day of celebrations, the Sex Pistols attempted to interrupt the Jubilee festivities by playing their song from a boat on the River Thames, but they were arrested after a brief scuffle. Despite overwhelming public approval, there was enough discontent within the British public that many agreed with the song's message, and subsequently bought enough copies during Jubilee Week to rocket "God Save the Queen" to #2 on the UK pop charts. During the festivities and in the immediate aftermath, radio stations were under strict orders not to play the tune. The Sex Pistols in 1977. ... God Save the Queen (B-side Did You No Wrong) was the second single by punk band The Sex Pistols. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ...


The soap opera Coronation Street wrote an elaborate Jubilee parade into the storyline, having Rovers' Return manageress Annie Walker (played by Doris Speed) dress up in elaborate costume as Elizabeth I. Ken Barlow and "Uncle Albert" played Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing respectively. The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of Our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television... The opening title of Coronation Street, since 2002. ... Doris Speed OBE ( February 3, 1899 - November 16, 1994) was a British actress, most known for her role as snooty Rovers Return manageress Annie Walker on Coronation Street, a role she played from 1960 to 1983. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Ken Barlow, after he found out that his third wife, Deirdre, was having an affair with his rival Mike Baldwin. ... Edmund Hillary on the New Zealand 5 dollar note Sir Edmund Percival Hillary, KG, ONZ, KBE (born July 20, 1919) is a New Zealander mountaineer and explorer, most famous for the first successful climb of Mount Everest. ... Tenzing Norgay (May 15, 1914 - May 9, 1986) was a Nepalese Sherpa, a participant in seven expeditions to Mount Everest culminating in the first successful ascent, during Sir John Hunts expedition of 1953. ...


Lasting impact

Various places were named after the Jubilee. The under-construction Fleet Line of the London Underground was re-named the Jubilee Line, though it did not open until 1979. Other places named after the Jubilee were the Silver Jubilee Walkway and the South Bank Jubilee Gardens. Slight modifications to the famous London Underground roundel indicate the name of each station on platform and outdoor signs. ... The Jubilee Line is a line on the London Underground, coloured grey on the Tube map. ... 1979 is a common year starting on Monday. ...


Apart from names, the Jubilee also saw the borough of Derby granted the status of a city. Derby (pronounced dar-bee ) is a city in the East Midlands of England. ... Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ...


External links

  • Silver Jubilee page from royalinsight.gov.uk (http://www.royalinsight.gov.uk/OutPut/Page930.asp)
  • The Queen's Silver Jubilee address (4 May 1977), from the BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/1959535.stm)
  • This day in history (7 June 1977), from the BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/june/7/newsid_2562000/2562633.stm)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1147 words)
The Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II's accession to the throne of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and other Commonwealth realms.
Elizabeth II reads the Speech from the Throne in the Parliament of Canada during her Jubilee visit to Ottawa.
The most infamous event marking the Jubilee was the Sex Pistols' release of the vehement anti-monarchy song "God Save the Queen." The song was seen as an attack on both the royal family (which the Sex Pistols called a "fascist regime") and the United Kingdom as a nation.
Silver Jubilee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (169 words)
A Silver Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 25th anniversary.
In the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth realms such as Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, a Silver Jubilee is held in the 25th year of a monarch's reign (followed by a Golden Jubilee in the 50th year and a Diamond Jubilee in the 60th year).
King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand celebrated his Silver Jubilee on 9 June 1971.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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