FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Silver Age of Comics
Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash.
Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash.

The Silver Age of Comic Books is an informal name for the period of artistic advancement and commercial success in mainstream American comic books, predominantly in the superhero genre, that lasted roughly from the mid 1950s to the early 1970s. It followed the Golden Age of Comic Books. Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with 30 days. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing super-speed, nicknamed the Scarlet Speedster. ... American comic books are typically small magazines containing fictional stories in the artistic medium of comics. ... Superman (left) and Batman, two of the most recognizable and influential superheroes. ... // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the height of the baby-boom from returning... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ...


During the Silver Age, the character make-up of superheroes evolved. Writers injected science fiction concepts into the origins and adventures of superheroes. More importantly, superheroes became more human and troubled and, as a result of the Silver Age, character development and personal conflict are almost as important to a superhero’s mythos as super powers and epic adventures. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Mythos can mean: A collection of myths A web-based comic and video game series created by Variant Interactive; see Mythos: the Demon Hunters A brand of Greek beer; see Mythos (beer) An Origins Award-winning card game released in 1996 by Chaosium; see Mythos (card game). ...

Contents


Events leading up to the Silver Age

Following World War II, superheroes faced a steady decline in popularity. Their development was complicated by the rise of gritty horror and crime-related comic books and a moral crusade, lead by Dr. Fredric Wertham, which deemed all of the above genres as subversive. In response, the comic book industry implemented the stringent Comics Code, which only allowed for the tamest stories. World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was by far the bloodiest, most expensive, and most significant war in... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any media intended to scare, unsettle or horrify the reader. ... Fredric Wertham Dr. Fredric Wertham (March 20, 1895–November 29, 1981) was a German-American psychiatrist and crusading author who protested the purportedly harmful effects of mass media—comic books in particular—on the development of children. ... The Comics Code Authority (CCA) is an organization founded in 1954 to act as a de facto censor for American comic books. ...


Because of the decline in the popularity of superheroes and the regulations of the code, only bland versions of DC ComicsSuperman, Batman, and Wonder Woman were regularly published by the mid-1950s. The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... Superman, nicknamed The Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938 and eventually became the most popular and well-known comic book icon of all time. ... The comic book character Batman (originally referred to as The Batman, and occasionally as The Bat-Man), is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Wonder Woman is a DC Comics superheroine. ... // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the height of the baby-boom from returning...


History

Amazing Fantasy #15 (1962), the first appearance of Spider-Man, one of the most significant new superheroes of the Silver Age
Amazing Fantasy #15 (1962), the first appearance of Spider-Man, one of the most significant new superheroes of the Silver Age

The beginning (as well as the end) of the Silver Age is cause for debate, but it is generally agreed that the period began with DC ComicsShowcase #4 in 1956, which introduced the modernized version of the Flash. Under the editorship of Julius Schwartz, the Flash was the first of many old characters revised into more modern, science fiction-influenced versions. Others included Green Lantern, the Atom and Hawkman. DC also introduced The Justice League of America, an all-star group consisting of its most popular characters. Download high resolution version (486x738, 78 KB)Cover of Marvel Comics Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man. ... Download high resolution version (486x738, 78 KB)Cover of Marvel Comics Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... Showcase was a DC Comics comic book anthology series. ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 - February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #6, art by Ethan Van Sciver. ... The Atom is a superhero created in 1940 for All-American Comics, and recreated in 1961 in a self-named title, a part of DC Comics Silver Age of Comic Books. ... Hawkman is also the name of a talented reggae artist who collaborated with trip-hop artist Tricky. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


The success of these series helped the company find a viable genre that could make for successful properties under the restrictions of the Comics Code Authority. This breathed new life into the comic book medium and sales began to recover. The seal of the Comics Code Authority, which appears on the covers of approved comic books. ...


The period also saw the rise of Marvel Comics under the guidance of writer/editor Stan Lee and artists/cowriters Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, who introduced more sophisticated characterization and dynamic plotting into superhero comics. The most popular and influential Marvel character of this period was Spider-Man. Other significant and long-lasting Marvel heroes introduced during the Silver Age include The Fantastic Four, The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man, Thor, Daredevil, The X-Men, and Marvel's own all-star group The Avengers Marvel Comics NYSE: MVL, sometimes called by the nickname The House of Ideas, is an American comic book company. ... Stan Lee and his most famous co-creation, Spider-Man. ... The Fantastic Four, one of Kirbys most famous creations. ... Cover art by Steve Ditko Steve Ditko (born 2 November 1927 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania) is a renowned comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The Fantastic Four are a Marvel Comics superhero group. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Iron Man is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Thor in comics can mean: Thor - a god in the comic book series Valhalla which is based on the Elder Eddas. ... For people who perform risky stunts as a profession, see stunt performer. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... The Avengers are a Marvel Comics superhero team, comprised of many of the Marvel Universes most popular and powerful heroes and the Marvel Comics counterpart to DC Comics Justice League of America. ...


After an initial period of hesitance, DC began to adopt some of Marvel’s artistic approaches.


The resurgence of the superhero genre proved so influential that publishing houses not known for their superheroes, like Archie Comics, Charlton Comics and Dell Comics, attempted their own superheroes, but met with limited critical and popular success. Tower Comics was an exception with the acclaimed T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents series by Wally Wood, but it was short-lived. Archie Comics is an American comic book publisher known for its many series featuring the fictional teenagers Archie Andrews, Betty Cooper, Veronica Lodge, Reggie Mantle and Forsythe Jughead Jones. ... Charlton Comics was a minor comic book publishing house that existed from 1946 to 1986, best known for several of its characters and some of the noteworthy creators who worked for it. ... Dell Comics was the comic book publishing arm of Dell Publications, which got its start in pulp magazines. ... Categories: Stub | Comic book publishers ... T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents is a team of comic book superheroes originally published by Tower Comics in the 1960s. ... Wallace Wally Wood (June 17, 1927–November 2, 1981), best known for his work in EC Comics and Mad magazine, was an imaginative writer-illustrator who freelanced to a wide variety of markets. ...

The cover ofNick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. #7, featuring the signature surrealistic art of Jim Steranko
The cover ofNick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. #7, featuring the signature surrealistic art of Jim Steranko

In addition, new artists, many of whom had formal education in their art, employed their education to expand the mainstream medium into new art styles previously ignored. The major examples include Neal Adams who introduced naturalism with his realistic style and Jim Steranko who introduced surrealism in his stories. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x610, 74 KB)Cover to Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. #7, December, 1968. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x610, 74 KB)Cover to Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. #7, December, 1968. ... Cover to Green Lantern #76, April 1970. ... Naturalism refers to a number of different topics: Philosophical naturalism: the view that nothing exists but the world — that there are no supernatural entities. ... The cover of #7, featuring the signature surrealistic art of Jim Steranko James Jim Steranko (born November 5, 1938) is an American illusionist and escape artist, magician, musician, graphic artist, comic book writer, artist, and historian, publisher, and movie storyboard illustrator. ... Surrealism is a philosophy, a cultural and artistic movement, and a term used to describe unexpected juxtapositions. ...


The period hit its commercial peak in 1966-1968 with the popularity of the Batman TV series, which both heightened interest in comics and damaged their public image as a legitimate artistic medium. 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Burt Ward as Robin and Adam West as Batman Batman was the title of an exceptionally popular TV series based on the comic-book character Batman that aired on ABC TV for 2 1/2 seasons from 12 January 1966 to 14 March 1968. ...


The precise end of the Silver Age is in some debate. Candidate periods include:

  • The departure of Jack Kirby from Marvel Comics and beginning his Fourth World titles at DC Comics (1970).
  • The advent of darker superhero stories in the early 1970s. During this time, Batman returned to his roots as a dubious vigilante, Dennis O'Neil and Neal Adams started the gritty, urban-themed series Green Lantern/Green Arrow, and Spider-Man’s love interest Gwen Stacy was killed off.
  • The rise of a new wave of horror comics such as Ghost Rider and Tomb of Dracula in the early 1970s.
  • The debut of the "All-New All-Different" X-Men in Giant-Size X-Men #1 (1975), restarting a franchise that would dominate subsequent decades.

The period immediately following the Silver Age up to the mid-1980s is commonly referred to as the Bronze Age of Comic Books (by analogy with Bronze Age). The period after that is referred to as the Modern Age of Comic Books, the Dark Age of Comic Books (referring to both a decline in the industry and the popularity of grim titles such as Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns and Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' Watchmen), the Iron Age of Comic Books, or the Diamond Age of Comic Books (suggested by Scott McCloud, with the different facets signifying the current diversity in the medium). The Fourth World is the popular name given to a number of interconnecting comic book titles produced by Jack Kirby and published by DC Comics from 1970 to 1973. ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s. ... Cover to Green Lantern #76, April 1970. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #6, art by Ethan Van Sciver. ... Green Arrow (Oliver Ollie Queen) is a DC Comics superhero. ... Gwendolyne Gwen Stacy is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe published by Marvel Comics. ... Ghost Rider is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics, and of several characters in the Marvel Universe. ... Tomb of Dracula was a horror comic book published by Marvel Comics in the 1970s. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Wolverine, a member of the X-Men, a popular franchise in the Modern Age, and an example of an anti-hero, a popular character type of the Modern Age The Modern Age of Comic Books is an informal name for the period of American comic books generally considered to last... The first issue of The Dark Knight Returns, perhaps Millers best known work Frank Miller (born 27 January 1957 in Olney, Maryland) is an American writer and artist best known for his film noir-style comic book stories. ... The premiere issue of the series The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ... Alan Moore Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton, England) is a British writer most famous for his work in comics. ... Screenshot of Beneath a Steel Sky, backgrounds courtesy of Dave Gibbons. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Scott McCloud (born 1960 in Massachusetts, USA) is a cartoonist and a leading popular scholar of comics as a distinct literary and artistic medium. ...


The Underground comics scene got its major start in this period. However because the artistic content, goals and marketing of these comic books were so different from the mainstream companies, it is generally considered a separate movement in the medium. The term underground comics or comix describes the self-published or small press comic books that sprang up in the US in the late 1960s. ...


Noted Silver Age talents

During this period in the mainstream companies, the writers were downplayed in favour of the editors. Artists, especially with the success of Marvel, began to play an increasingly important role in the writing process themselves. do i even know who you are??? // Headline text Bold textAn Editor is a person who prepares text—typically language, but also images and sounds—for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. ...


Editors

Stan Lee and his most famous co-creation, Spider-Man. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 - February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Mortimer Weisinger (1915-1978) was an American magazine and comic book editor. ...

Artists

Gene Colan (born September 1, 1926) is an American comic book illustrator, who sometimes worked under the name Adam Austin. ... Cover art by Steve Ditko Steve Ditko (born 2 November 1927 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania) is a renowned comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man. ... Carmine Infantino (May 24, 1925-) is a comic book artist and editor who was a major force in the Silver Age of Comic Books. ... Eli Katz (April 6, 1926–January 31, 2000), who worked under the name Gil Kane, was a comic book illustrator whose career spanned the so-called Golden and Silver Ages of comics. ... The Fantastic Four, one of Kirbys most famous creations. ... Joe Kubert is a legendary comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ... Cover to Green Lantern #76, April 1970. ... The cover of #7, featuring the signature surrealistic art of Jim Steranko James Jim Steranko (born November 5, 1938) is an American illusionist and escape artist, magician, musician, graphic artist, comic book writer, artist, and historian, publisher, and movie storyboard illustrator. ... Curt Swan (born February 17, 1920 in Minneapolis, Minnesota; died June 16, 1996) was an American comic book artist, most known for his work on the Superman comics. ... Wallace Wally Wood (June 17, 1927–November 2, 1981), best known for his work in EC Comics and Mad magazine, was an imaginative writer-illustrator who freelanced to a wide variety of markets. ...

Writers

Stan Lee and his most famous co-creation, Spider-Man. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940 in Missouri) is an American writer and editor of comic books. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s. ... Robert Kanigher (June 18, 1915 - May 6, 2002) was a prolific comic book writer whose career spanned five decades. ... Robert Haney (1926 - November 25, 2004) was a comic book writer. ...

Style/convention

Certain styles and conventions were generally common to titles during the Silver Age.


Comic book covers

The comic book covers of the Silver Age are notable for the abundance of speech bubbles on the cover. While this was seen in some Golden Age titles, the practice became quite commonplace, in a bid to hook the reader into purchasing the book. This tactic lost currency, though, as the extreme scenes and dialogue presented on the covers would differ greatly from the actual events transpiring in the book itself. This style fell out of favor, and is rarely seen today, except as homage or parody. Four different shapes of speech or thought balloons Speech balloons (also speech bubbles or word balloons) are a graphic convention used in comic books, strips, and cartoons to allow words (and much less often, pictures) to be understood as representing the speech or thoughts of a given character in the... Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal (1210 words)
The Silver Age of Comic Books was a period of artistic advancement and commercial success in mainstream American comic books, predominantly in the superhero genre, that lasted roughly from the late 1950s/early 1960s to the early 1970s.
The beginning (as well as the end) of the Silver Age is cause for debate, but it is generally agreed that the period began with DC Comics' Showcase #4 in 1956, which introduced the modern version of the Flash.
The state of the comic book industry as of September 2007, especially that of DC Comics, has been labeled by fans as a second silver age, or Neo Silver Age, due to the return of several of the concepts prevalent in the first silver age.
Comic Book Resources - CBR News: Julius Schwartz dies at the age of 88 (449 words)
Comics writer Mark Evanier has reported the unfortunate news that comics legend Julius Schwartz died this morning at Winthrop Hospital in New York City at 2:30 AM.
Schwartz was a pioneer of the Silver Age of comics, joining DC and immediately having an effect on the publications of that company.
The majority consensus agrees that the Golden Age of Comics gave way to the Silver Age of Comics with the publication of DC's "Showcase" #4 in 1956 when DC revived the Flash.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m