FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Silesians" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Silesians
Silesians
Total population

some millions[1]; ~200,000 - official nationality declarations

Regions with significant populations
Poland: 173,200 nationality declarations (2002) some millions (non nationality declarations)
Czech Republic: 10,878 nationality declarations (2001), several hundred thousand (non nationality declarations)
Germany: unknown
Languages
Silesian, Polish, German, Czech.
Religions

Catholicism, Protestantism This article is about the West Slavic language / Polish dialect. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      As a Christian ecclesiastical... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms...

Related ethnic groups
West Slavs, Germanic peoples
Girl in Upper Silesian dress from Mysłowice, 2006
Girl in Upper Silesian dress from Mysłowice, 2006
Woman in Silesian dress from Teschen, 1914
Woman in Silesian dress from Teschen, 1914

Silesians (Silesian: Ślônzoki; Polish: Ślązacy; Czech: Slezané; German: Schlesier) are the West Slavic inhabitants of Silesia (Czech: Slezsko) , Poland and Czech Republic. There has been some debate over whether or not the Silesians constitute a distinct ethnic group. Nevertheless, more than 170,000 people declared Silesian ethnicity in the Polish national census in 2002, making them the largest minority group in Poland. The West Slavs are Slavic peoples speaking West Slavic languages. ... Thor/Donar, Germanic thunder god. ... Image File history File links Slazaczka. ... Image File history File links Slazaczka. ... MysÅ‚owice (German Myslowitz) is a town in south Poland with 80,000 inhabitants (1995). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1365x2025, 426 KB) Woman in Silesian dress from Cieszyn (de Teschen, cz: Těšín) area (about 1914) Kobieta w stroju cieszyÅ„skim, okoÅ‚o roku 1914 Picture from my family collection Drozdp 18:40, 31 March 2006 (UTC) File links The... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1365x2025, 426 KB) Woman in Silesian dress from Cieszyn (de Teschen, cz: Těšín) area (about 1914) Kobieta w stroju cieszyÅ„skim, okoÅ‚o roku 1914 Picture from my family collection Drozdp 18:40, 31 March 2006 (UTC) File links The... This article is a short history of the towns of Cieszyn and Cesky Tesin as well as the Duchy of Cieszyn. ... This article is about the West Slavic language / Polish dialect. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Silesia (Czech: ; German: ; Latin: ; Polish: ; Silesian: Åšlónsk) is a historical region in central Europe. ...


The term Silesian can also be applied in a more general manner to describe an inhabitant of Silesia, regardless of ethnicity.

Contents

History

Settled by Slavic peoples (Ślężanie) circa 500 A.D., Silesia has been long contested by various peoples, states and principalities. The constant shifting of Silesia between Czech/Austrian, Polish and German control over several centuries resulted in the multilingual Silesians developing a separate culture that borrowed heavily from Czech, Polish and German. Åšlężanie was a tribe of West Slavs, specifically of the Lechitic/Polish tribes/Silesian tribes groups, inhabiting territories of Lower Silesia, near Mount Åšlęża mountain and ÅšlÄ™za river up to the area of modern city of WrocÅ‚aw. ...


In the Middle Ages, Silesia was a Piast duchy, which subsequently became a possession of the Bohemian crown under the Holy Roman Empire in the 14th century and passed with that crown to the Habsburg Monarchy of Austria in 1526. In 1742, most of Silesia was seized by King Frederick the Great of Prussia in the War of the Austrian Succession. This part of Silesia constituted the Province of Silesia (later the Prussian provinces of Upper and Lower Silesia) until 1945. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Piast dynasty is a line of Kings and dukes that ruled Poland from its beginnings as an independent state up to 1370. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... Combatants Prussia Spain France Electorate of Bavaria Kingdom of Naples Austria Great Britain Dutch Republic Electorate of Saxony Sardinia Russian Empire Commanders Frederick II Leopold I Leopold II Maurice de Saxe François-Marie de Broglie Charles VII Ludwig Khevenhüller Charles Alexander George II Charles Emmanuel III Empress Maria... Please be advised that the factual accuracy of Wikipedia articles dealing with topics related to the Oder-Neisse Line is often disputed. ... Upper Silesia (Polish: , German: ) was a province of the Free State of Prussia from 1919 to 1945. ... Lower Silesia (Niederschlesien in German) was a province of the Free State of Prussia from 1919 to 1945. ...


Following World War II, the majority of Silesia was incorporated into Poland, with smaller regions remaining in East Germany and Czechoslovakia. Millions of Silesia's ethnic German inhabitants were subsequently expelled, but those Silesians classified by the Polish authorities as "autochthons" or "ethnic Poles insufficiently aware of their Polishness" were allowed to remain, after being were sifted out from the ethnic Germans by a process of "national verification".[2] In order to qualify, it was enough to speak some of the Upper Silesian dialect, or just to have a Slavic-sounding surname. Many such Silesians were allowed to remain in the city of Opole. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... GDR redirects here. ... Ethnic Germans – often simply called Germans – are those who are considered, by themselves or others, to be ethnically German but do not live within the present-day Federal Republic of Germany, nor necessarily hold its citizenship. ... Germans expelled from the Sudetenland // The expulsion of Germans after World War II refers to the forced migration of people considered Germans (Reichsdeutsche and some Volksdeutsche) from various European states and territories during 1945 and in the first three years after World War II 1946-48. ... The term indigenous peoples has no universal, standard or fixed definition, but can be used about any ethnic group who inhabit the geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection. ... Map of Upper Silesia, 1746 Upper Silesia (Polish: Górny Śląsk, German: Oberschlesien, Czech: Horní Slezsko) is the south-eastern part of Silesia, a historical and geographical region of Poland (Opole Voivodship and Silesian Voivodship) and of the Czech Republic (Silesian-Moravian Region). ... Opole ( ; German: ) is a city in southern Poland on the Oder River (Odra). ...


During the Communist era nearly 600,000 Silesians emigrated to West Germany.


Since the end of Communist rule in Poland, there have been calls for greater political representation for the Silesian ethnic minority. In 1997, a Katowice law court registered the Union of People of Silesian Nationality (ZLNS) as the political representative organization of the Silesian ethnic minority, but after two months the registration was revoked by a regional court. Capital Warsaw Language(s) Polish Government Socialist republic Leaders  - 1948–1956 BolesÅ‚aw Bierut (First)  - 1981-1989 Wojciech Jaruzelski (Last) Prime minister  - 1944-1947 E. Osóbka-Morawski  - 1947-1952 and 1954-1970 Józef Cyrankiewicz  - 1952-1954 BolesÅ‚aw Bierut  - 1970-1980 Piotr Jaroszewicz  - 1980 Edward Babiuch  - 1980-1981... Panorama of Katowice at night Katowice (pronunciation: [] (Czech: Katovice, German: Kattowitz) is an important city of the historical region of Upper Silesia in southern Poland on the KÅ‚odnica and Rawa rivers. ...


Language

Silesian (Upper Silesian) is spoken by the Silesian ethnic group. According to the last census in Poland (2002), some 70,000 people declared Silesian as their first language. Silesian language can refer to the Silesian - a dialect of Polish, sometimes considered a separate Western Slavonic language related to Czech and Polish), or the Lower Silesian (a dialect of German). ...


There is some contention over whether Silesian is a dialect or a language in its own right. A majority of Slavic linguists consider Silesian to be merely a prominent regional dialect of Polish. However, some people regard it as a separate language belonging to the West Slavic branch of Slavic languages, together with Polish, Upper and Lower Sorbian, and other Lekhitic languages, as well as Czech and Slovak. The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages) comprise the languages of the Slavic peoples. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... This article or section should be merged with List of Sorbian languages The Sorbian languages are members of the West Slavic branch of languages spoken in eastern Germany. ... The Lechitic languages include three or possibly four languages spoken in central Europe, principally in Poland and Germany. ...


See also

  • Category:People by city in Silesia

External links

  • Tomasz Kamusella. The Szlonzoks and their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzokian Nationalism

References

  1. ^ It is Silesians' theoretical number declaring the Silesian nationality together with number all indigenous occupants of Silesia different the nationality: the Polish, Czech or German nationality. Number this as well span diaspore in whole world. Only in Poland lives about 2 million Silesians (sources: Weekly "Our Time" Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, The Institute for European Studies, Ethnological institute of UW).
  2. ^ Kamusella, Tomasz (November 2005). Doing It Our Way (English). Transitions Online. Retrieved on 2006-07-25.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Silesian Voivodship - definition of Silesian Voivodship in Encyclopedia (830 words)
The Silesian voivodship lies in the south of Poland and is bordered by the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
The Silesian Upland (Wyzyna Śląska) is situated in the central and the north western part, with the hills of the Krakowsko-Częstochowska Upland (Jura Krakowsko-Częstochowska) in the northeastern area.
Strong links of the present Silesian voivodship (comprising area known as the Upper Silesia) with the Opole and Lower Silesian Voivodships is justified and motivated by historical identity of the Duchy of Silesia (Ksiestwo Śląskie) divided in the 13th century into the Upper and Lower Silesia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m