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Encyclopedia > Silent Movie
Silent Movie
Directed by Mel Brooks
Produced by Michael Hertzberg
Written by Mel Brooks
Ron Clark
Rudy de Luca
Barry Levinson
Starring Mel Brooks
Marty Feldman
Dom DeLuise
Bernadette Peters
Sid Caesar
Music by John Morris
Cinematography Paul Lohmann
Editing by Stanford C. Allen
Andrew Horvitch
John C. Howard
Release date(s) USA June 17, 1976
Running time 86 min.
Country USA
Language Silent
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile
This article is about the comedy film. For voiceless films, see Silent film.

Silent Movie is a 1976 comedy film directed by and starring Mel Brooks. The ensemble cast includes Dom DeLuise, Marty Feldman, Bernadette Peters, Sid Caesar, Anne Bancroft, Liza Minnelli, Burt Reynolds, James Caan, and Paul Newman. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (495x755, 97 KB) Summary movie poster for the American theatrical release of the film Silent Movie (1976) poster artwork by John Alvin Source URL: http://www. ... Mel Brooks in the 2005 film of The Producers Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an American actor, writer, director, and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies, or as he says, spoofs. ... Ron Clark This article is an autobiography, and may not conform to Wikipedias NPOV policy. ... Barry Levinson Barry Levinson (born April 6, 1942 in Baltimore, Maryland) is a Jewish-American screenwriter, film director, actor, and producer of film and television. ... Actor Marty Feldman in Young Frankenstein (1974) Martin Alan Marty Feldman (July 8, 1934 – December 2, 1982) was a writer, comedian and film and television actor in the UK, famous for his bulging eyes, which were the result of a thyroid condition. ... Dom DeLuise as Urgo in an episode of Stargate: SG-1. ... Bernadette Peters is the stage name of Bernadette Lazzara (born February 28, 1948 in Ozone Park, Queens, New York City), an actress and singer. ... Sid Caesar (born Isaac Sidney Caesar on September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television sketch comedy series Your Show of Shows. ... The Right Honourable John Morris, Earl Morris of Aberavon, KG, PC, QC (born 5 November 1931), was a UK Labour member of Parliament for Aberavon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... // Events March 22 - Filming begins on George Lucas Star Wars science fiction film. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... // Events March 22 - Filming begins on George Lucas Star Wars science fiction film. ... Airplane! is considered by some critics to be one of the funniest movies of all time. ... Mel Brooks in the 2005 film of The Producers Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an American actor, writer, director, and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies, or as he says, spoofs. ... Dom DeLuise as Urgo in an episode of Stargate: SG-1. ... Actor Marty Feldman in Young Frankenstein (1974) Martin Alan Marty Feldman (July 8, 1934 – December 2, 1982) was a writer, comedian and film and television actor in the UK, famous for his bulging eyes, which were the result of a thyroid condition. ... Bernadette Peters is the stage name of Bernadette Lazzara (born February 28, 1948 in Ozone Park, Queens, New York City), an actress and singer. ... Sid Caesar (born Isaac Sidney Caesar on September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television sketch comedy series Your Show of Shows. ... Anne Bancroft and Dustin Hoffman in The Graduate Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Liza May Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-winning and Tony Award-winning American actress and singer. ... Burt Reynolds in 2005 Burt Reynolds (born Burton Leon Reynolds, Jr. ... James Edmund Caan[1] (born March 26, 1940 in The Bronx, New York) is an Academy Award, Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated American film, stage and television actor. ... Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and film director. ...


As its title suggests, the film is a parody of the silent film genre, particularly the slapstick comedies of Hal Roach, Mack Sennett and Buster Keaton. Among the film's many jokes is the fact that the only audible line in the movie is spoken by Marcel Marceau, the famous mime. Sound is also used for a scene that shows New York City and the score begins to play "San Francisco", only to have it come to a sudden stop as if the orchestra realizes they are playing the wrong music. They then go into "I'll Take Manhattan" instead. Parody of Back to the Future In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... Harold Eugene Roach, Sr. ... Mack Sennett (1880 - 1960) Mack Sennett (January 17, 1880 – November 5, 1960) was an innovator of slapstick comedy in film. ... Joseph Frank Keaton Jr. ... Marcel Mangel (born March 22, 1923; Strasbourg, France), better known by his stage name Marcel Marceau, is a well-known mime, among the most popular representatives of this art form world-wide. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


A play on the 1970s trend of large corporations buying up smaller companies is parodied in this film by the attempt of the Engulf and Devour Corporation to take control of a studio (a thinly veiled reference to Gulf+Western's takeover of Paramount Pictures). The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... Gulf and Western Industries, Inc. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ...


Plot

Mel Funn's (Brooks) filmmaking trio, consisting of himself, Marty Eggs (Feldman) and Dom Bell (DeLuise), set out to pitch Funn's new screenplay to the chief (Caesar) of Big Picture Studios. The screenplay is for the first major silent motion picture in forty years. At first the studio chief rejects the idea because the studio is not very successful, and he doesn't trust Funn's judgement based on his previous drinking problem, but Funn convinces him that if he can get all of Hollywood's biggest stars to be in the film that he could save the studio.


Funn, Eggs, and Bell proceed to recruit Burt Reynolds, James Caan, Liza Minnelli, Anne Bancroft, and Paul Newman (all played by themselves) to be in their silent film. They ask Marcel Marceau (also as himself) to be in the film and he replies, "No," the only spoken line (or word if you'd rather) in the film. Funn claims not to understand Marceau's reply because he "doesn't speak French."


Meanwhile, Engulf (Gould) and Devour (Carey) of Engulf & Devour Studios worry that Funn will save Big Picture Studios, and they will be unable to buy it out. They attempt to "stop Funn with sex," by sending Vilma Kaplan (Peters) to seduce, and then pretend to fall in love with Mel Funn. Funn realizes the truth the day before the filming of the movie is set to begin, and returns to drinking. Little did he know that Vilma really had fallen in love with him.


Vilma, Eggs, and Bell convince Funn to stop drinking and have several hundred cups of coffee. The movie is filmed on schedule, but is stolen from the theater by Engulf & Devour just before its preview. Funn and his associates steal it back and, after a slapstick car chase and final "showdown," return the film to the theater, where it becomes a big hit. Funn, Eggs, and Bell succeed in saving Big Picture Studios.


Gags

The following slapstick gags take place in the movie:

  • At the beginning of the movie, Mel, Dom, and Marty give a pregnant woman a lift to the hospital, and her weight causes the car to make the entire trip on its two rear wheels.
  • Just before going to see the Studio Chief, Mel and his friends cross their fingers for good luck, and Mel can't uncross his. Later, he shakes hands with the Chief, and the Chief's fingers are crossed instead of Mel's as a result; the Chief then "passes" this crossed condition to his secretary's fingers the same way.
  • Right after the Studio Chief tells Mel that "slapstick is dead," the Chief falls backward in his chair onto the floor, and the force of this causes him and the chair to be hurled forward through the front of his desk and across the office.
  • When Mel gets a bright idea in the Chief's office, a lamp bulb that's behind and above his head comes on.
  • In one scene, the Studio Chief and the moviemaking trio watch a scene from a low-budget picture called The Queen's Rifles: Three rows of British troops are being ordered to fire their rifles. First the front row fires; then the second row fires, shooting the first row in their backs; and then the last row fires, shooting the second row in their backs. Trying to find something positive to say, Mel says, "I like the last row best."
  • While Dom uses a public restroom, two men — one blind, one sighted — each ask Marty to look after his dog while they use the facilities. After they come out, they each accidentally take the other's dog; because of this, the guide dog won't let the sighted man cross a street, and the non-guide dog takes off, dragging the blind man behind it.
  • In order to approach Liza Minelli so they can ask her to be in their movie, Mel, Dom, and Marty disguse themselves in suits of armor and go into the studio commissary where she's eating. Unaccustomed to such cumbersome outfits, the trio stumble and trip repeatedly, destroying tables and chairs in the process.
  • In the theater where the preview of the movie is going to take place, two people go to the snack counter and get a trash can loaded with popcorn (the front of which reads "Popcorn — Trash Can Size"). Butter is poured into it with what appears to be a gasoline pump. Astounded by the sight of this, Mel turns to Dom — who's eating a Hershey bar the size of a door.
  • During the car chase, one of the vehicles causes an exterminator's van to run off the road; this causes the giant prop fly to be hurled from the roof of the van and land on a customer's table at a sidewalk café. The diner, played by Henny Youngman, then shouts the famous line, "Waiter, there's a fly in my soup!"

A blind man is lead by his guide dog in Brasília, Brazil. ... Liza Minnelli (born March 12, 1946) is an American actress and singer. ... Armor or armour (see spelling differences) is protective clothing intended to defend its wearer from intentional harm in combat and military engagements, typically associated with soldiers. ... A commissary is someone delegated by a superior to execute a duty or an office. ... A waste container (known more commonly in British English as a dustbin and American English as a trash can) is a container, which can be made out of metal or plastic¹, used to store refuse. ... Popcorn Popcorn or popping corn is a type of maize which explodes from the kernel and puffs up when it is heated in oil or by dry heat. ... Hershey bar is a wanna-be chocolate bar manufactured by the The Hershey Company - the worlds largest chocolate company - located in Hershey, Pennsylvania. ... Exterminator could refer to A practitioner in pest control. ... Henny Youngman performing at the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon Henny Youngman (Henry Youngman, March 16, 1906 - February 24, 1998) was a comedian and violinist famous for one-liners, short simple jokes usually delivered rapid-fire. ...

External link


The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, television stars, video games and production crew personnel. ...

Films Directed by Mel Brooks
The Producers | The Twelve Chairs | Young Frankenstein | Blazing Saddles | Silent Movie | High Anxiety
History of the World, Part I | Spaceballs | Life Stinks | Robin Hood: Men in Tights | Dracula: Dead and Loving It

  Results from FactBites:
 
Silent Movies (1572 words)
The silent movie is, for the vast majority of audiences, even those that have serious interests in films, the pariah of the movie world.
In fact, the late silents are pretty incontrovertably superior in technique to almost any sound film made in the first four or five years of the sound period.
There are still many people alive who saw silent films when they were the only game in town, but they are getting older and older, and their world recedes daily from the world of today.
Silent Movie Theater (2237 words)
Silents were therefore kept in release well into the thirties, and some of the early talking films were marketed in both silent and sound versions.
The Silent Movie Theater was always founded on the love of an era and of the wonderful creativity of the men and women who made movies back then.
The Silent Movie Theater was closed again for several years until it was purchased, refurbished and reopened by a new proprietor in 1999.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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