FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sijilmasa

Sijilmasa (or Sijilmassa) was a mediaeval trade centre in the western Maghreb. The Maghreb (المغرب العربي ; sometimes also rendered Moghreb), meaning western in Arabic, is the region of the continent of Africa north of the Sahara desert and west of the Nile — specifically, the modern countries of Morocco, Western Sahara (annexed and occupied by Morocco), Algeria, Tunisia, Libya — and to a much lesser extent...


Sijilmasa was an oasis town south west of Fez on the northern edge of the Sahara, overlooking the Ziz River. It was established by Sufris in 757. Up until the 11th century it was, as the exit-point for the western Trans-Sahara trade route, one of the most important trade centres in the Maghreb. Sijilmasa became very wealthy through trade with Ghana, above all through the exchange of luxury items from the Mediterranean for gold. This article is about the city Fez in Morocco. ... The Sufris were a sect of Islam in the 7th and 8th centuries, and a part of the Kharijites. ... Events March 9 - A major earthquake strikes Palestine and Syria Offa becomes king of Mercia. ... Djenné, founded in 800, an important trading base, now a World Heritage Site Trans-Saharan trade, between Mediterranean countries and West Africa, was an important trade route from the eighth century until the late sixteenth century. ... The Maghreb (المغرب العربي ; sometimes also rendered Moghreb), meaning western in Arabic, is the region of the continent of Africa north of the Sahara desert and west of the Nile — specifically, the modern countries of Morocco, Western Sahara (annexed and occupied by Morocco), Algeria, Tunisia, Libya — and to a much lesser extent... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ...


On account of its wealth, the city was able to assert its independence under the Miknasa tribe as a Kharijite Emirate, freeing itself from the Abbasid Caliphate as early as 771. In alliance with the Caliphate of Córdoba it was also able to remain apart from the Fatimids of Ifriqiya in the 10th century. However, when the Miknasa allied themselves with the Fatimids, they were dislodged by the Berber Magrawa tribe, who were allied with the Umayyads of Córdoba. The Miknasa were a Berber tribe in Morocco and western Algeria The Miknasa Berbers originated in Tripolitania and southern Tunisia, but migrated westwards into central Morocco and western Algeria in pre-Islamic times. ... Kharijites were members of an Islamic sect in late 7th and early 8th century AD, concentrated in todays southern Iraq. ... Generally speaking, an emirate (Arabic imarah, plural imarat) is a territory that is administered by an emir, although in Arabic the term can be generalized to mean any province of a country that is administered by a member of the ruling class. ... Abbasid provinces during the caliphate of Harun al-Rashid Abbasid (Arabic: العبّاسيّون AbbāsÄ«yÅ«n) was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Islamic empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs. ... An Anglicized/Latinized version of the Arabic word خليفة or Khalīfah, Caliph (  listen?) is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... Events December 4 - Austrasian King Carloman dies, leaving his brother Charlemagne king of the now complete Frank kingdom (Pope Leo III crowned Charlemagne Emperor of the Franks at Rome on Christmas Day, 800). ... The interior of the Great Mosque in Córdoba, now a Christian cathedral. ... The Fatimid Empire or Fatimid Caliphate ruled North Africa from A.D. 909 to 1171. ... In medieval history, Ifriqiya or Ifriqiyah (Arabic: إفريقية) was the area comprising the coastal regions of what are today western Libya, Tunisia, and eastern Algeria. ... The Berbers (also called Imazighen, free men, singular Amazigh) are an ethnic group indigenous to Northwest Africa, speaking the Berber languages of the Afroasiatic family. ... The Magrawa were a Berber tribe in central and western Algeria. ... The Umayyad Dynasty (Arabic الأمويون / بنو أمية umawiyy; in Turkish, Emevi) was the first dynasty of caliphs of the Prophet Muhammad who were not closely related to Muhammad himself, though they were of the same Meccan tribe, the Quraish. ...


Under the Magrawa the city retained its role as a trade centre, but came increasingly into conflict with the Sanhaja, a nomad tribe of the Sahara. In 1054, Ibn Yasin allied the Almoravids with the Sanhaja and captured Sijilmasa in 1054, imposing his rigorous interpretation of Islam. A revolt quickly followed (1055), in the course of which the Almoravids were defeated and their leader Yahya ibn Umar killed. His successor Abu-Bakr Ibn-Umar put down the rebellion in 1056 and laid waste to Sijilmasa, which never recovered its status a centre of trade. The Sanhaja were one of the largest Berber tribal confederations of the Maghreb, along with the Zanata and Masmuda History The tribes of the Sanhaja settled at first in the northern Sahara. ... Kazakh nomads in the steppes of the Russian Empire, ca. ... Events Cardinal Humbertus, a representative of Pope Leo IX, and Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, decree each others excommunication. ... Abdallah Ibn Yasin (d. ... Almoravides (From Arabic المرابطون sing. ... Events Cardinal Humbertus, a representative of Pope Leo IX, and Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, decree each others excommunication. ... Islām is described as a dÄ«n, meaning way of life and/or guidance. Six articles of belief There are six basic beliefs shared by all Muslims: 1. ... Events January 11 - Theodora becomes Reigning Empress of the Eastern Roman Empire. ... Abu-Bakr Ibn-Umar (died in 1087), Moroccan Almoravid ruler. ... Events Anselm of Canterbury leaves Italy. ...


Although it was destroyed again in 1363, it was rebuilt under the orders of Sultan Moulay Ismail in the 18th century. It was conquered by the nomadic Ait Atta people in 1818. Today, Sijilmassa is recognized by the World Monuments Fund as an endangered site, and preserved by the Moroccan Ministry of Culture. Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1358 1359 1360 1361 1362 - 1363 - 1364 1365 1366 1367 1368 See also: 1363 state leaders Events Magnus II, King of Sweden, is deposed by Albert of Mecklenburg. ... Moulay Ismail the Bloodthirsty (1675-1727) was a Moroccan ruler. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The World Monuments Fund (WMF) is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of historic art and architecture worldwide through fieldwork, advocacy, grantmaking, education, and training. ... Look up Culture in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikinews has news related to this article: Culture and entertainment Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Cultural Development in Antiquity Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Culture and Civilization in Modern Times Classificatory system for cultures and civilizations, by Dr. Sam Vaknin...


External link


  Results from FactBites:
 
Archeology (659 words)
The former capital of the district of Tafilalt, Sijilmasa was founded in the middle of the eighth century by the Bani Wasul, a tribe of Zenata Berbers.
Sijilmasa's situation as an oasis center on the east bank of Wadi Ziz—virtually the northern edge of the Sahara—rendered it the main point of entry for West African exports to Morocco.
In the 11th century, Sijilmasa was described as a large city enclosed by walls constructed of dry mud on stone foundations, penetrated by 12 gates.
Encyclopedia: Sijilmasa (1212 words)
Sijilmasa (or Sijilmassa) was a mediaeval trade centre in the western Maghreb
Sijilmasa was an oasis town south west of Fez on the northern edge of the Sahara, overlooking the Ziz River.
In 1054, Ibn Yasin allied the Almoravids with the Sanhaja and captured Sijilmasa in 1054, imposing his rigorous interpretation of Islam.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m