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Encyclopedia > Sigurd
Sigurd sculpture in Bremen

Sigurd (Old Norse: Sigurðr, German: Siegfried) was a legendary hero of Norse mythology, as well as the central character in the Völsunga saga. The earliest extant representations for his legend come in pictoral form from seven runestones in Sweden[1] and most notably the Ramsund carving (c. 1000) and the Gök Runestone (11th century). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 687 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sigurd Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 687 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sigurd Metadata This... This article is about the city in Germany. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The Ramsund carving in Sweden depicts 1) how Sigurd is sitting naked in front of the fire preparing the dragon heart, from Fafnir, for his foster-father Regin, who is Fafnirs brother. ... A rune stone Rune stones are somewhat flat standing stones with runic stone carvings from the Iron Age (Viking Age) and early middle ages found in most parts of Scandinavia. ... The Ramsund carving of Sigurd and the passages from the Volsunga saga The Ramsund carving also known as the Sigurd carving is a runic carving with the official name Södermanlands runinskrifter 101. ... Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ... The Gök Runestone is, beside the nearby Ramsund carving, one of seven Swedish runestones that are the earliest extant representation of the legend of Sigurd who appears in the Iceland Völsunga saga and the German Nibelungenlied as well as in Richard Wagners operas. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ...


As Siegfried, he is the hero in the German Nibelungenlied, and Richard Wagner's operas Siegfried and Götterdämmerung. The Nibelungenlied is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Siegfried is the third of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...   (Twilight of the Gods – see Notes) is the last of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...


The name Sigurðr is an Icelandic or Norwegian corruption of the German Siegfried as the correct Old Norse would have been Sigruþr (Sigröd), a form which appears in the Ramsund carving that depicts the legend[2]. Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... The Ramsund carving of Sigurd and the passages from the Volsunga saga The Ramsund carving also known as the Sigurd carving is a runic carving with the official name Södermanlands runinskrifter 101. ...

Contents

The Völsunga saga

Volsung Cycle
Volsunga saga
Poetic Edda
Norna-Gests þáttr
Þiðrekssaga
Artifacts
Andvarinaut
Gram
Dwarves
Andvari
Hreidmar
Otr
Regin
Dragon
Fafnir
People
Volsung
Sigmund
Signy
Sinfjötli
Helgi Hundingsbane
Sigurd
Brynhild
Gudrun
Attila
Gunnar
Locations
Gautland
Hunaland
Related
Nibelungenlied
Hagbard and Signy

In the Völsunga saga, Sigurd is the posthumous son of Sigmund and his second wife, Hiordis. Sigmund dies in battle when he attacks Odin, and Odin shatters Sigmund's sword. Dying, Sigmund tells Hiordis of her pregnancy and bequeaths the fragments of his sword to his unborn son. The Volsung Cycle is the name of a series of Germanic legends based on the same matter as Niebelungenlied, and which were recorded in medieval Iceland. ... The Ramsund carving in Sweden depicts 1) how Sigurd is sitting naked in front of the fire preparing the dragon heart, from Fafnir, for his foster-father Regin, who is Fafnirs brother. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems from the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... The death of Nornagest, by Gunnar Vidar Forssell Norna-Gests þáttr or the Story of Norna-Gest is a legendary saga about the Norse hero Norna-Gest. ... Þiðrekssaga (also Thidreksaga, Thidrekssaga, Niflungasaga or Vilkina saga) is a saga of the adventures of the hero Dietrich von Bern, believed to be based on the historical Theodoric the Great, and written down about 1250. ... In Norse mythology, Andvarinaut was a magical ring, first owned by Andvari. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafnir. ... In Norse mythology, Andvari was a dwarf. ... In Norse mythology, Hreidmar was the avaricious king of the dwarf folk, who captured three gods with his unbreakable chains. ... OTR and Otr may refer to: Off-the-record messaging, an instant messenger encryption technology Ótr, a dwarf in Norse mythology Off The Record (TV series), A Canadian sports talk show Off-Topic Republic, a sect of the Toolkitzone. ... In Norse mythology, Regin was the son of Hreidmar and foster father of Sigurd. ... Fáfnir guards the gold hoard in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagners Siegfried. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Volsung was murdered by the Geatish king Siggeir and avenged by one of his sons, Sigmund. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Signy and Hagbard Signy is the name of two heroines in two legends from Scandinavian mythology which were very popular in medieval Scandinavia. ... Odin taking the dead Sinfjötli to Valhalla Sinfjötli (Old Norse) or Fitela (Anglo-Saxon) was born out of the incestuous relationship between Sigmund and his sister Signy. ... Helgi Hundingsbane/Hundingsbani was a hero in the Norse sagas. ... In Norse mythology, Brünnehilde was a shieldmaiden and a Valkyrie. ... Gudrun and Sigurd In Norse mythology, Gudrun, who is called Kriemhild in the Nibelungenlied, was the sister of Gunnar. ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Gunnar is the most attractive and unreservedly admired of Icelandic saga heroes,a man of heroism, energy, virtue, and --- above all --- unswerving loyalty to the land of his birth and love for its overpowering physical beauty Tricked by his enemies into disobeying the warnings of his prescient friend Njáll... Götaland, Gothia, Gothland [1], Gotland (AHD), Gautland or Geatland, is a historical land of Sweden, and was a separate kingdom, before Sweden was unified. ... Many historians consider the Huns (meaning person in Mongolian language) the first Turkic people mentioned in European history. ... The Nibelungenlied is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... Signhild Hagbard and Signy (Signe) (the Viking Age) or Habor and Sign(h)ild (the Middle Ages and later) were a pair of lovers in Scandinavian mythology and folklore whose legend was widely popular. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ...


Hiordis marries King Alf, and Alf sends Sigurd to Regin as a fosterling. Regin tempts Sigurd to greed and violence by first asking Sigurd if he has control over Sigmund's gold. When Sigurd says that Alf and his family control the gold and will give him anything he desires, Regin asks Sigurd why he consents to a lowly position at court. Sigurd replies that he is treated as an equal by the kings and can get anything he desires. Then Regin asks Sigurd why he acts as stableboy to the kings and has no horse of his own. Sigurd then goes to get a horse. An old man (Odin in disguise) advises Sigurd on choice of horse, and in this way Sigurd gets Grani, a horse derived from Odin's own Sleipnir. Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling. ... In Norse mythology, Regin was the son of Hreidmar and foster father of Sigurd. ... Grani is a mythical eight-legged horse that appears in Norse mythology. ... The Ardre image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ...


Finally, Regin tempts Sigurd by telling him the story of the Otter's Gold. Regin's father was Hreidmar, and his brothers were Fafnir and Ótr. Regin was a natural at smithing, and Otr was natural at swimming. Otr used to swim at Andvari's waterfall, where the dwarf Andvari lived. Andvari often assumed the form of a pike and swam in the pool. In Norse mythology, Hreidmar was the avaricious king of the dwarf folk, who captured three gods with his unbreakable chains. ... Fáfnir guards the gold hoard in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagners Siegfried. ... In Norse mythology, Ótr (alternately: Ott, Oter, Otr, Ottar, Ottarr, Otter) is a dwarf. ... In Norse mythology, Andvari was a dwarf. ...


One day, the Æsir saw Otr with a fish on the banks, thought him an otter, and Loki killed him. They took the carcass to the nearby home of Hreidmar to display their catch. Hreidmar, Fafnir, and Regin seized the Æsir and demanded compensation for the death of Otr. The compensation was to stuff the body with gold and cover the skin with gold. Loki got the net from the sea giantess Rán, caught Andvari (as a pike), and demanded all of the dwarf's gold. Andvari gave the gold, except for a ring. Loki took this ring, too, although it carried a curse of death on its bearer. The Æsir stuffed Otr's body with gold and covered its skin in gold and covered the last exposed place (a whisker) with the ring of Andvari. Afterward, Fafnir killed Hreidmar and took the gold. In Old Norse, the Æsir (singular Ás, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur, Anglo-Saxon Ós, from Proto-Germanic *Ansuz) are the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse mythology. ... It has been suggested that Loki and the dwarfs be merged into this article or section. ... Rán In Norse mythology, Rán is a sea goddess who collects the drowned in a net. ...

Siegfried Tasting the Dragon's Blood by Arthur Rackham
Siegfried Tasting the Dragon's Blood by Arthur Rackham

Sigurd agrees to kill Fafnir, who has turned himself into a dragon in order to be better able to guard the gold. Sigurd has Regin make him a sword, which he tests by striking the anvil. The sword shatters, so he has Regin make another. This also shatters. Finally, Sigurd has Regin make a sword out of the fragments that had been left to him by Sigmund. The resulting sword, Gram, cuts through the anvil. To kill Fafnir the dragon, Regin advises him to dig a pit, wait for Fafnir to walk over it, and then stab the dragon. An old man (Odin) advises Sigurd to dig several trenches also to drain the blood, and to bathe in it after killing the dragon; bathing in Fafnir's blood confers invulnerability. Sigurd does so and kills Fafnir; Sigurd then bathes in the dragon's blood, which touches all of his body except part of his shoulder where a leaf has stuck. Regin then asks Sigurd to give him Fafnir's heart. Sigurd tastes Fafnir's blood and gains the power to understand the language of birds. Birds advise him to kill Regin, since Regin is plotting Sigurd's death. Sigurd beheads Regin, roasts Fafnir's heart, and consumes part of it. This gives him the gift of "wisdom" (prophecy). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... An illustration from Alices Adventures in Wonderland Arthur Rackham (September 19, 1867 – September 6, 1939) was a prolific British book illustrator. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafnir. ... A language of the birds, a mystical, perfect or divine language, or a mythical or magical language used by birds to communicate with the initiated , is postulated in mythology, medieval literature and occultism. ...


Sigurd met Brynhildr, a "shieldmaiden," after killing Fafnir. She pledges herself to him but also prophecies his doom and marriage to another. (In Völsunga saga, it is not clear that Brynhild is a Valkyrie or in any way supernatural.) Sigurd and Brynhilds funeral In Norse mythology, Brynhildr was a shieldmaiden and a valkyrie. ... Hervor dying after the battle with the Huns. ... The Valkyries Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. ...


Sigurd went to the court of Heimar, who was married to Bekkhild, sister of Brynhild, and then to the court of Gjúki, where he came to live. Gjuki had three sons and one daughter by his wife, Grimhild. The sons were Gunnar, Hogni and Guttorm, and the daughter was Gudrun. Grimhild made an "Ale of Forgetfulness" to make Sigurd forget Brynhild, and he then married Gudrun. Later, Gunnar wanted to court Brynhild. Brynhild's bower was surrounded by flames, and she promised herself only to the man daring enough to go through them. Only Grani, Sigurd's horse, would do it, and only with Sigurd on it. Sigurd exchanged shapes with Gunnar, rode through the flames, and won Brynhild for Gunnar. Gjúki is the king of the Burgundians in the eddic poem Atlakvida, and he was the father of Gunnar (see Gunther). ... This article should be merged with Kriemhild In Norse mythology, Grimhild was the witch who cast a spell on Sigurd making him leave his wife, Brünnehilde, for Gudrun. ... ΑÖÖÖÜđiÔ:For the character of the sitcom Friends see here. ... Gudrun and Sigurd In Norse mythology, Gudrun, who is called Kriemhild in the Nibelungenlied, was the sister of Gunnar. ...


Some time later, Brynhild taunted Gudrun for having a better husband, and Gudrun explained all that had passed to Brynhild and explained the deception. For having been deceived and cheated of the husband she had desired, Brynhild plots revenge. First, she refuses to speak to anyone and withdraws. Eventually, Sigurd was sent by Gunnar to see what was wrong, and Brynhild accuses Sigurd of taking liberties with her. Gunnar and Hogni plot Sigurd's death and enchant their brother, Guttorm, to a frenzy to accomplish the deed. Guttorm kills Sigurd in bed, and Brynhild kills Sigurd's three year old son. Brynhild then wills herself to die, and a funeral pyre is built for Guttorm (killed by Sigurd), Sigurd, Brynhild, and Sigurd's son. Sigurd and Brynhild had the daughter Aslaug who married Ragnar Lodbrok. Aslaug, Asl g, Kraka or Kr ka, was a queen of Scandinavian mythology who appears in Snorris Edda, the V lsunga saga and the saga of Ragnar Lodbrok. ... Aella murdering Ragnar Lodbrok Ragnar Lodbrok (Ragnar Hairy-Breeks, Old Norse: Ragnarr Loðbrók) Swedish king, ruled the early kingdoms of Sweden and Denmark some time in the 8th or 9th century. ...


By Thidrekssaga

The Old Norse Thidrekssaga relates a slightly different tale, with Regin as the dragon and Mimir as his brother and foster father to Siegfried. In this version, King Sigmund returns home from travel to learn of accusations of his wife's illicit relations with a menial. He orders her tongue to be cut out in the forest as punishment. During execution of the order, she secretly births a child and places it in a glass vessel which falls into a river and travels downstream. It is found by a doe who nurses the young child, who is then subsequently found by a wise smith of the forest, Mimir who names him Siegfried and takes him as his own. But growing large and willful, Mimir gets rid of him by conspiring with his brother, Regin, a dragon, to kill him. But Siegfried slays the dragon and then slays his unloyal father. [3] Thidreks saga (also Thidreksaga, Thidrekssaga, Niflungasaga) is a saga of the adventures of the hero Dietrich von Bern, believed to be based on the historical Theodoric the Great, and written down about 1250. ... In Norse mythology, Regin was the son of Hreidmar and foster father of Sigurd. ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... In Norse mythology, Regin was the son of Hreidmar and foster father of Sigurd. ...


Illustration

The Ramsund carving depicts Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Ramsund carving of Sigurd and the passages from the Volsunga saga The Ramsund carving also known as the Sigurd carving is a runic carving with the official name Södermanlands runinskrifter 101. ... The Ramsund carving of Sigurd and the passages from the Volsunga saga The Ramsund carving also known as the Sigurd carving is a runic carving with the official name Södermanlands runinskrifter 101. ...

  1. how Sigurd is sitting naked in front of the fire preparing the dragon heart, from Fafnir, for his foster-father Regin, who is Fafnir's brother. The heart is not yet fully roasted, and when Sigurd touches it, he burns himself and sticks his finger into his mouth. As he has tasted dragon blood (some blood was on the heart), he starts to understand the birds' song.
  2. The birds say that Regin will not keep his promise of reconciliation and will try to kill Sigurd, which causes Sigurd to cut off Regin's head.
  3. Regin is dead beside his own head, his smithing tools with which he reforged Sigurd's sword Gram are scattered around him, and
  4. Regin's horse is laden with the dragon's treasure.
  5. is the previous event when Sigurd killed Fafnir, and
  6. shows Otr from the saga's beginning.

Fáfnir guards the gold hoard in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagners Siegfried. ... In Norse mythology, Regin was the son of Hreidmar and foster father of Sigurd. ... Fáfnir guards the gold hoard in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagners Siegfried. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafnir. ... OTR and Otr may refer to: Off-the-record messaging, an instant messenger encryption technology Ótr, a dwarf in Norse mythology Off The Record (TV series), A Canadian sports talk show Off-Topic Republic, a sect of the Toolkitzone. ...

Parallels in other legends

There are parallels in several European myths and legends.


The sword Sigmund draws from Branstock is similar to the sword drawn by King Arthur from the stone. How Sir Bedivere Cast the Sword Excalibur into the Water. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ...


The story of Sigurd eating the heart of the dragon is very similar to the Irish story of Fionn mac Cumhail eating the salmon of knowledge. Fionn mac Cumhail (earlier Finn or Find mac Cumail or mac Umaill, pronounced roughly Finn mac Cool) was a legendary hunter-warrior of Irish mythology, also known in Scotland and the Isle of Man. ...


Sigurd's invulnerability and his weak point are similar to those of the Greek hero Achilles , the Persian hero Esfandyar, and the Duryodhana story of India's Mahabharata epic. The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (1821–1859) (Musée Fabre) In Greek mythology, Achilles (also Akhilleus or Achilleus) (Ancient Greek: ) was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homers Iliad, which takes for its theme, not the War... For information about all peoples of Iran, see Demographics of Iran; for Central Asian Persians, see Tajiks. ... Esfandiar or Esfandyar is an Iranian legendary hero. ... In the Mahabharata, Duryodhana (or Dhuryodhana) is the eldest son of the blind king Dhritarashtra by Queen Gandhari, and the eldest of the one hundred Kaurava brothers, and the chief antagonist of the Pandavas. ... Manuscript illustration of the Battle of Kurukshetra The (Devanagari: ) is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the . ...


Cultural impact

The Norwegian royal family claimed descent from Sigurd and the Volsungs. Furthermore, because dragons were seen as symbols of Satan in medieval typologies, the story of Sigurd slaying Fafnir was often depicted in Christian churches in Scandinavia. For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe and includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ...


Adaptations of the legend

The best-known adaptation of the Sigurd legend is Richard Wagner's cycle of music dramas Der Ring des Nibelungen. The Sigurd legend is the basis of Siegfried and contributes the stories of Die Walküre and Götterdämmerung. Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Music drama is the term ascribed to the revolutionary medium of artistic expression created by the German composer Richard Wagner. ... This article is about the series of operas; for the film, see Dark Kingdom: The Dragon King. ... Siegfried is the third of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... Die Walküre (The Valkyrie) is the second of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...   (Twilight of the Gods – see Notes) is the last of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...


In 1884 the French composer Ernest Reyer wrote the lesser-known opera Sigurd, which has the benefit of condensing the story into one evening, with equally stirring music. 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Ernest Reyer (1823 – 1909) was the adopted name of French opera composer and music critic Louis Étienne Ernest Rey. ...


The illustrator Arthur Rackham drew 70 vibrant renderings of the story for the book Siegfried & The Twilight of the Gods, translated by Margaret Armour (1910). An illustration from Alices Adventures in Wonderland Arthur Rackham (September 19, 1867 – September 6, 1939) was a prolific British book illustrator. ...


William Morris's epic poem Sigurd the Volsung is a major retelling of the story in English verse. William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris, publisher Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Modern retellings/distillations of the legend are found in James Baldwin's Story of Siegfried and the Sci Fi Channel's Dark Kingdom: The Dragon King. SCI FI (sometimes rendered Sci-Fi when part of a longer phrase) is an American cable television channel, launched on September 24, 1992, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ...


While not straight adaptations, elements of the legend were likely borrowed by J. R. R. Tolkien in The Lord of the Rings (a special golden ring and a shattered sword which is reforged), as well as in the story of Túrin Turambar from The Silmarillion (specifically in the slaying of Glaurung the dragon). John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ... The shards of Narsil in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring. ... In The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien, Túrin Turambar was a Man of Middle-earth, who became a tragic hero (or anti-hero) of the First Age in the tale called Narn i Chîn Húrin (The Tale of the Children of Húrin). Unpublished drafts of... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... Known as The Deceiver,The Golden, and the Worm of Greed, Glaurung was the first and greatest of the land-bound fire-breathing Dragon, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Namco adapted the legend for the game Soul Calibur in which Siegfried, a German knight who murdered his own father, wields the unholy sword Soul Edge, and transforms into Nightmare, whose right arm resembles that of a dragon. Also, in certain games, Siegfried/Nightmare has an optional sword named Glam, a mistranslation of Gram, Sigurd's own mighty sword. Soul Calibur is the second game in the Soul series of fighting games developed and produced by Namco, consisting of Soul Edge (Soul Blade in the US), Soul Calibur, Soul Calibur II, and Soul Calibur III. Originally an arcade game, Soul Calibur was ported and released for the Sega Dreamcast... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ...


Sigfried is also the name of a minor villain character of the anime Saint Seiya. In the second story-arc of the series, Seiya and the other Saints of Athena must battle against the God warriors of Odin whose most powerful warrior is named Siegfried. Serialized in Shonen Jump Original run January 1986 – December 1990 No. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ...


Notes

  1. ^ An article at the Museum of Foteviken, Sweden, retrieved January 19, 2007.
  2. ^ Brate, E. (1922). Sveriges runinskrifter. p. 126.
  3. ^ Rank, Otto. The Myth of the Birth of the Hero. Vintage Books: New York, 1932, p. 56-59.

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sigurd

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sigurd - LoveToKnow 1911 (1098 words)
SIGURD (S'igurar) or Siegfried (M. Sifrit), the hero of the Nibelungenlied, and of a number of Scandinavian poems included in the older Edda, as well as of the prose V iilsunga Saga, which is based upon the latter.
Sigurd acquired great fame and riches by slaying the dragon Fafnir, but the chief interest of the story centres round his connexion with the court of the Burgundian king Gunnar (Gunther).
Sigurd himself is not mentioned by any contemporary writer; but, apart from the dragon incident, there is nothing in the story which affords sufficient justification for regarding his personality as mythical.
The Sigurd Portal (382 words)
Sigurd positions himself in a trench beneath the dragon's trail, and stabs him from beneath when Fafnir leaves his lair for water.
Sigurd killing Fafnir the dragon, by stabbing him from beneath.
Sigurd tests the doneness of the meat with his thumb and understands from nearby birds that Regin intends to kill him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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