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Encyclopedia > Sigma Nu
Sigma Nu

Image:Sigmanucrest.png
(ΣΝ)

Founded January 1, 1869 (Age 139)
the Virginia Military Institute
Type Social, Honor
Scope United States, Canada
Motto Excelling with Honor
Colors Gold, White, Black
Symbol Serpent
Flower White rose (The Classic Five-Petaled, wild, white English Florabunda)
Chapters 195 (including 10 colonies)
Members 206,653 currently
{{{lifetime}}} lifetime
Headquarters 9 Lewis St., P.O. Box 1869
Lexington, Virginia, USA
Homepage http://www.sigmanu.org

ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. Sigma Nu was founded in 1869 by three cadets at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia. Founders James Frank Hopkins, Judge Greenfield Quarles and James McIlvaine Riley formed Sigma Nu shortly after Hopkins witnessed what he considered a hazing ritual by upperclassmen at the Virginia Military Institute. Sigma Nu's existence remained secret until the founders publicly announced their new society on the first day of January 1869, the accepted birth date of Sigma Nu Fraternity. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ... Serpent can be any of the following: The reptile commonly called snake. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... This article refers to the general definition of cadet. ... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ... Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Born in Ripley, Mississippi on December 30, 1845. ... Born in Christian County, Kentucky, April 1, 1847. ... Born in St. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ...


The Fraternity's values are summarized as an adherence to the principles of brotherly Love, Truth, and Honor. Because of its military heritage, Sigma Nu retains many military trappings in its chapter ranks and traditions, and places much importance on the concept of personal honor. Today, Sigma Nu honors its founders' integrity as the basis of its strictly enforced ban on hazing. Sigma Nu is also one-third of the Lexington Triad, along with Kappa Alpha Order and Alpha Tau Omega. Lexington Triad Monument The Lexington Triad refers to three national fraternities that were founded during Reconstruction in Lexington, Virginia. ... Kappa Alpha Order (commonly known as KA) is a collegiate Order of Knights and American social fraternity. ... ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) (commonly known as ATO, Taus, Alpha Taus) is an American social fraternity that annually ranks among the top ten national fraternities for numbers of chapters and total number of members. ...

Contents

History

Sigma Nu's history began in the period following the American Civil War, when a Confederate veteran from Mississippi enrolled at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington Virginia. That cadet was James Frank Hopkins, and it is to him and two of his classmates that Sigma Nu owes its existence. When Hopkins enrolled at VMI, the South was in a state of turmoil, only beginning to recover from its devastating military defeat. VMI was recognized for its civil engineering program at a time when the South needed engineers to repair its bridges, railroads and general infrastructure. At the Institute, cadets suffered from the aftermath of war and its disruption of 19th Century home life. No less insufferable was the institutional system of physical harassment imposed on lower classmen by their own upper classmen. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Hopkins had experienced military subservience during the war, and was willing to tolerate a reasonable amount of constraint intended to induce discipline. However, Hopkins was unwilling to accept any amount of hazing, as then tolerated at VMI, in the name of his Christian faith. "Not one ounce of hazing" was he willing to suffer and he was doggedly adamant to eliminate it.

Today, a portion of the limestone outcropping where the Fraternity was founded sits outside its Lexington headquarters.
Today, a portion of the limestone outcropping where the Fraternity was founded sits outside its Lexington headquarters.

Two classmates and close friends who were also unhappy with the hazing situation soon joined Hopkins. They were Greenfield Quarles, from Arkansas, a Kentuckian by birth, and James McIlvaine Riley from St. Louis, Missouri. These three men began a movement to completely abolish the hazing system at VMI. Their efforts climaxed on a moonlit October night in 1868, presumably following Bible study at the superintendent's home, when the three met at a limestone outcropping on the edge of the VMI parade ground. Hopkins, Quarles and Riley clasped hands on the Bible and made a solemn pledge to form a new brotherhood. Image File history File links SigmaNuRock. ... Image File history File links SigmaNuRock. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ...


The vows taken by these three Founders bound them together to oppose hazing at VMI and encouraged the application of the Principle of Honor in all their relationships. That the founders should adopt Honor as a guiding principle was a natural move since a rigid code of Honor was already an established tradition of the VMI Corps of Cadets. The Honor system at VMI required each cadet to conform to the duty imposed by his conscience that each act be governed by a high sense of honor. Szkoła Rycerska Szkoła Rycerska Full name: Akademia Szlachecka Korpusu Kadetów (English :Knight School) was the first state school in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth established in 1765 in Warsaw, by King Stanislaw August Poniatowski. ...


The founders of Sigma Nu

"The Founding of Sigma Nu" by James B. Settles (Gamma Omicron)

Image File history File links Founding1. ... Image File history File links Founding1. ... Born in Ripley, Mississippi on December 30, 1845. ... Born in St. ...

Announcement

Although the Sigma Nu Fraternity began in October 1868, its existence was kept secret until the founders publicly announced their new society on the first day of January 1869, the accepted birth date of Sigma Nu. In those days the Institute did not close for "breaks" as we know them. It suspended classes only for the day on such occasions as Christmas and New Year's Day.


The fraternity's spiritual birth, however, actually occurred in 1866, the year the Founders entered VMI, when Hopkins first rebelled against hazing at the Institute. Still, the Founders did not create Sigma Nu with any feeling of animosity toward others; rather they were prompted by the impulses of sympathy and affection for all people, which underlie abiding peace and contentment. They had experienced enough hate and destruction all during and after the War. They wanted to end all abuses, and they knew it would not come easily. It was never an issue of who won or lost the War. It was only an issue of winning the peace.


The new fraternity needed an identifying symbol, and Founder Hopkins designed a badge for the members to wear on their uniforms. That badge was patterned after the White Cross of the French Légion d'honneur, which was worn on the uniform of a favorite professor of Hopkins. The badge was first introduced in the spring of 1869. Keeping with the Founders' decree, the Badge has remained unchanged ever since, except in size and the raised center. Even today, the collegiate Commander's Badge, and the Badge of the Grand Officers remain identical to Hopkins' original badge. When the first slate of Officers was chosen, Riley, the most popular, was elected Commander and Hopkins the Lieutenant Commander. Typically, Hopkins, the epitome of humbleness, was delighted that "Mac" Riley was chosen leader. It gave Hopkins "the doer", thinker, planner, along with Quarles who had similar talent, more of an opportunity to concentrate on solidifying Alpha before he graduated in 1870. By the 1869 commencement, the group had grown to fifty-one members. [1]


Expansion

Expansion began for Sigma Nu in 1870 after the graduation of the Founders, when the mother chapter at VMI, then known as Chapter I, approved the establishment of a chapter at the University of Virginia. In addition, many of the graduating Brothers from VMI were given charters that they could grant to collegiate chapters near where they settled. Many of these chapters would not survive, as a number of states passed anti-fraternity laws during the decade.


Sigma Nu established a chapter at North Georgia Agricultural College in 1881, soon after Georgia's law was repealed. One of the men instrumental in the chartering of the North Georgia chapter was John Alexander Howard, who had graduated two years previously but nonetheless took an interest in the new society. A journalist by trade, Howard read widely and in his reading discovered Baird's Manual of American College Fraternities, which prompted him to examine shortcomings in Sigma Nu. At this time Sigma Nu was still using the Roman numeral designation for chapters. Howard felt that the fraternity should adopt a Greek-letter designation according to the founding date of the chapter. Thus, his own chapter at North Georgia became Kappa, while VMI's chapter would be known as Alpha. Another contribution was the founding of The Delta, the fraternity's international magazine. He selected the magazine's title to symbolize the geographic relationship of the three existing chapters of the fraternity at that time, Alpha, Lambda (at Washington and Lee University) and Kappa. The first edition of The Delta was published in April 1883 and contained sixteen pages.[2] North Georgia College & State University is a military college, located in Dahlonega, Georgia. ... Bairds Manual of American College Fraternites was last published in its 20th edition in 1991 by the Bairds Manual Foundation. ... The system of Roman numerals is a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, and was adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Virginia. ...


First National Convention

The year following the publication of The Delta witnessed another important milestone for Sigma Nu. That event was the First National Convention, which met at the Maxwell House Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee, July 9 to July 10, 1884. The person responsible for the First National Convention was Isaac P. Robinson (Lambda, Washington and Lee). Robinson felt that a meeting of alumni and collegiate representatives was imperative because of a need to update the constitution, revise procedures and coordinate efforts. The Sigma Nu convention later became known as Grand Chapter. It is held every two years and serves as the legislative body of the General Fraternity. Maxwell House is a brand of coffee. ... Nashville redirects here. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Washington and Lee University (originally Washington College) is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia. ...


Another event in 1884 which had a major impact upon the Fraternity was the establishment of Nu Chapter at the University of Kansas. During the first fifteen years of its existence, Sigma Nu was primarily a Southern fraternity, and the decision to establish Nu Chapter was to be the first step in a radical expansion program. Nu chapter was to open the west and north for Sigma Nu. Eugene L. Alford of Lambda was instrumental in the founding of Nu Chapter. The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or just Kansas) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ...


Two charter initiates of Nu who became very influential in Sigma Nu in later years were Perlee Rawson Bennett and Grant Woodbury Harrington. Bennett served the fraternity as Grand Recorder for many years and in 1890 was elected Regent. He presided over the Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, and Tenth Grand Chapters. Harrington became editor of The Delta and Grand Recorder. For eight years (1886–1894) he had almost total responsibility for the administration of the fraternity. Other early members of Nu Chapter were the Sears brothers, William H. Sears, Clarence H. Sears and Walter James Sears, who also became influential in Sigma Nu affairs. Their brother, Lorin Beecher Sears, attended Ohio State University where no chapter of Sigma Nu existed at the time. Walter was so interested in having Lorin initiated into the Fraternity that he entered Ohio State University, founded Beta Nu and became its first initiate; Lorin became its second. Walter Sears devoted much of his lifetime to Sigma Nu, but his name will be remembered best for his beautiful prose work, "The Creed of Sigma Nu."[3] Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ...


The Move West

Leland Stanford University opened in 1891. Among its first students was Carl Lane Clemans, who had founded Chi Chapter at Cornell College in Iowa. Clemans was determined to open a chapter on the West Coast, and he recruited enough men to charter Beta Chi Chapter at Stanford in November 1891. Beta Chi's fame soon spread to Berkeley, and Clemans went there to help organize Beta Psi in February 1892. Stanford redirects here. ... This article is about the liberal arts college in Mount Vernon, Iowa. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


Sigma Nu opened the Northwest to Greek letter organizations when Gamma Chi was chartered at the University of Washington in 1895, earning the Fraternity kudos throughout the Greek community for its "Northwest conquest." For almost four years Sigma Nu was the only college fraternity in the Northwest, having been the first to establish a chapter not only in the State of Washington, but also Montana and Oregon. The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Beta Iota at Mount Union was chartered by Walter James Sears in 1892. Three years later Beta Iota initiated Albert Hughes Wilson, to whom Sigma Nu owes a great debt. "Bert" Wilson served as Regent, but his most noteworthy achievement was in expansion. Wilson established more chapters than any other member of the Fraternity, thirty-two in all, and he is generally credited with helping develop Sigma Nu into a geographically representative organization. Brother Wilson was the exemplar of inter-fraternity spirit. As an aside, it should be noted that Brother Wilson C. Morris (Beta Iota, Mt. Union) is given credit by Sigma Tau Gamma men's fraternity as being the driving force behind its founding, while the collegiate Brothers of Delta Theta Chapter at Lombard College (now at Knox College) assisted greatly with the founding of Alpha Xi Delta women's fraternity.[4] Mount Union may refer to: Mount Union, Pennsylvania Mount Union, Iowa Mount Union College This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mount Union College is a 4-year private, liberal arts college in Alliance, Ohio. ... Sigma Tau Gamma Fraternity or Sig Tau is a U.S. all-male college social fraternity founded on June 28, 1920 at University of Central Missouri (then known as Central Missouri State Teachers College). ... Lombard College was a college located in Galesburg, Illinois. ... Knox College is a four-year coeducational private liberal arts college located in Galesburg, Illinois. ... Alpha Xi Delta (ΑΞΔ) was founded in 1893 by ten women at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, who shared a vision of an organization dedicated to the personal growth of women. ...


Headquarters established

Having active chapters in each section of the country, Sigma Nu was now in every sense a national fraternity. Expansion proceeded at an orderly rate, and by 1915 there was a need for centrally located administrative offices with full-time officers. Heretofore, the various Sigma Nu officers maintained their files and records at their own homes or places of business. Fire had once destroyed many of the fraternity's records, and there was a lack of coordination in general.


Following the Denver Grand Chapter in 1915, the High Council approved the establishment of the central administrative system first proposed by Regent Francis V. Keesling (Beta Chi, Stanford). The plan, adapted by Walter J. Sears, converted the High Council into a board of directors elected by the Grand Chapter; all executive and administrative duties previously exercised by members of the High Council and committees were lodged in a single official – the General Secretary (now Executive Director) – appointed by the High Council and subordinate to its direction. This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ...


Indianapolis was selected as the location of the fraternity's headquarters, and on November 1, 1915 the General Offices were opened there temporarily in the Lemcke Annex before moving into the main building. Bixby Willis (Lambda, Washington and Lee), a past Grand Treasurer of Sigma Nu, was employed as the first General Secretary. In 1926 the central office was moved to the Illinois Building in Indianapolis. Indianapolis served as the fraternity's headquarters for forty-two years, during which time fifty-five new chapters were added to the roster.[5] The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Deaths of the Founders

Founder James Riley, who had served ten years (1869–1879) as the fraternity's first Regent, died (entered "chapter eternal," as members of the fraternity refer to it) on May 6, 1911, in St. Louis, Missouri. Members of the Fraternity carried his remains to a burial plot purchased in Bellefontaine Cemetery by the St. Louis Alumni Chapter in fraternal affection for the Founder. is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Bellefontaine Cemetery (established in 1849) and the Roman Catholic Calvary Cemetery (established in 1857) in St. ...


James Frank Hopkins died on December 15, 1913, and he was buried in the village cemetery at Mabelvale, Arkansas beside his wife, Jennie Barclay Hopkins, a native Lexingtonian. In 1920 a memorial was dedicated at the gravesite. Greenfield Quarles, the only Founder still living at the time, offered a tribute to Alpha 1: is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

"The love of our Brother for his fellow man was only excelled by his love of God. His example has instilled into the hearts of us all the principles which guide us now, and these principles will go down in future generations for all time. His life has been an inspiration to all youth. All that was mortal of Brother Hopkins lies buried here; but his immortal spirit will live forever."

Six months later, the last of the three Founders, Judge Greenfield Quarles, died at his home in Helena, Arkansas, January 14, 1921.[6] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Helena-West Helena, Arkansas. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Return to Lexington

A monument in Lexington honors the three fraternities that began in the town.
A monument in Lexington honors the three fraternities that began in the town.

Even before Sigma Nu's first central office was organized in Indianapolis, some dreamed of the day when the Fraternity would have an appropriate shrine at Sigma Nu's birthplace, but it took nearly four decades before the first step was taken. That step was the appointment of a Headquarters Committee in 1954. It compared rent with ownership and ultimately recommended the latter in a college town where a Sigma Nu chapter thrived. Inevitably Sigma Nu history and tradition pointed to Lexington. Image File history File links Lexington_Triad. ... Image File history File links Lexington_Triad. ...


Regent James W. Bradley (Epsilon Epsilon, Oklahoma State) and his High Council took the historic step in 1957, purchasing without mortgage or lien a singularly appropriate property, a large home ideally suited for conversion and development. The land, conveniently located on the highest hill in the corporate limits of Lexington, Virginia, and on a seven-and-a-half-acre tract overlooking VMI and Washington and Lee University, enjoys the Blue Ridge Mountains as a backdrop to the east and the Allegheny Mountains to the west. The land was originally owned by the son of General Frances H. Smith, the first superintendent of VMI, who inspired Hopkins in the founding of Sigma Nu; the house, built by the grandson of Superintendent Smith, came to Sigma Nu directly from the Smith family. Milton L. Grigg, a renowned Virginia architect and participant in the famous Williamsburg Restoration, was contracted to restore the building. The headquarters facility was occupied in 1958 and officially dedicated June 9, 1960. Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The Allegheny Mountain Range (also spelled Alleghany and Allegany) -- informally, the Alleghenies -- is part of the Appalachian Mountain Range of the eastern United States. ... Milton Grigg was a Virginia architect best known for his restoration work at Colonial Williamsburg and Monticello. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Civil Rights era

Despite the progress, the 1950s and 1960s proved to be as tumultuous for the fraternity as they were for the United States as a whole. With many Sigma Nu chapters requesting to admit members who were not Christians or Caucasians, the fraternity faced a dilemma. As with most national fraternities, Sigma Nu's founding documents and policies (including the charters it granted to individual chapters) had traditionally and explicitly barred non-white members and Jews, as might be expected for an organization established during the nineteenth century. However, in recognition of the changing racial climate, some universities began to pressure the various fraternities to excise their racial qualifications.[citation needed] For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For the peoples actually from the Caucasus, see Peoples of the Caucasus. ...


When the issue was raised at a Grand Chapter (national convention) in the 1960s, many southern chapters threatened to leave the gathering if the racial language were changed; the fraternity voted against the proposal, and some chapters left the national organization in protest.[2] Sigma Nu offered a "waiver with honor," proposing to allow individual chapters to avoid compliance with certain specific clauses that prohibited them from admitting members of certain groups, but not all chapters found that option satisfactory. Delta Beta chapter at Dartmouth College, for example, seceded in 1961 and became the local fraternity Sigma Nu Delta; although it returned for a few months under a "waiver with honor," it soon departed again and did not return until 1985. Sigma Nu eventually adopted the reforms suggested, and now counts members of many different backgrounds among its ranks.[citation needed] In 1967 a national convention was held in Lexington, Virginia. At this convention there was a heated debate about the inclusion of blacks and Jews. There was a clear division between northern and southern chapters. Civil rights won the day and Sigma Nu was changed to be more inclusive. Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ...


Sigma Nu centennial

On January 1, 1969, Sigma Nu reached its one-hundredth anniversary. In the year that followed, it marked that event with a series of Centennial dinners at thirty-six locations throughout the country and with pilgrimages to the gravesites of the three Founders and the first editor of The Delta. Then on Sunday, June 15, a Centennial Convocation was held in Lexington. Two new wings of the Headquarters building were dedicated, one housing the Sigma Nu Museum and the other the Fraternity's Honor Library, later to be dedicated in tribute to former Executive Secretary Richard R. "Dick" Fletcher, who had long since earned the moniker "Mr. Sigma Nu". is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... A centennial is a 100-year anniversary of an event, or the celebrations pertaining thereto. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sigma Nu in its 100th year had come a long way from its founding. At the century mark it had issued 164 charters of which 143 chapters were alive and flourishing. Of the nine other truly national fraternities older than Sigma Nu, only three had more initiates. Sigma Nu owned 110 chapter houses providing living accommodations for more than 3,500 students. All this had been accomplished solely through the appeal of its principles without merger or honorary members. Every chapter had earned its own way by applying integrity in both purpose and method.


Sigma Nu celebrates its 125th year

Gamma Chi chapter at the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Well into the fraternity's second century, Sigma Nu continued its growth. Today, the number of initiates is nearly 200,000; the number of chapters approaching 300. Many of the fraternity's chapters have initiated more than a 1,000 members, with a large number topping 1,500 and several exceeding 2,000. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 874 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 874 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... Seattle redirects here. ...


Among the many significant achievements during the past decade has been the addition of adjacent properties in Lexington, Virginia, known as the Ethical Leadership Center, owned by the Sigma Nu Educational Foundation, Inc. Particularly noteworthy is Sigma Nu's inter fraternity leadership in risk reduction and risk management matters followed by the introduction of its unique LEAD Program, one of the most meaningful educational initiatives ever undertaken by a college fraternity. In addition the transfer of ownership of the Fraternity's Headquarters property, known as the Sigma Nu Headquarters Shrine, to the Sigma Nu Educational Foundation, Inc. [3]has enabled alumni gifts to assist in its restoration and preservation, so as to relieve the burden of upkeep on future generations of collegians.


Finally, in celebration of the fraternity's 125th anniversary, the foundation undertook construction of a third wing to the Headquarters Shrine as well as a Pathway of Honor of engraved bricks, which provides an opportunity to celebrate the life of each Sigma Nu. The Pathway of Honor will meander throughout the Lexington properties. A special "Pilgrimage to the Rock" was held at the 56th Grand Chapter held in Washington, DC, in August 1994.


Sigma Nu Educational Foundation, Inc.

In 1945, Brother William P. Yates (Beta Rho, Pennsylvania), inspired the formation of the "Sigma Nu Inc., Educational Foundation" with a handsome bequest. Its name was changed in recent times to the "Sigma Nu Educational Foundation, Inc." The foundation has been instrumental in assisting collegiate members with financial aid supplements, and the General Fraternity in the development of the LEAD Program, (LEAD is an acronym for leadership, ethics, achievement, development). The Foundation continues to support the exclusively educational programs of the Fraternity.[7] This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...


Fraternity structure

Sigma Nu is governed by a biennial national convention known as Grand Chapter, which elects the national officers and votes on legislation. The constitution of Sigma Nu is compiled as The LAW of Sigma Nu Fraternity, Inc. Look up Biennial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Biennial is a term referring to a period of two years, much in the same way centennial refers to 100 years. ...


The organization is a member of the North-American Interfraternity Conference, or NIC. The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ...


From its founding at VMI, a military school, Sigma Nu's officers have gone by military titles. While many Greek organizations follow a business or political system (e.g., "President", "Vice President"), Sigma Nu uses the following titles for its highest-ranking chapter officers, with analogous positions in parentheses:


1. Eminent Commander (similar to president)

Presides over all Chapter meetings and must remain neutral unless called upon to break a tie; regulates who may speak during chapter, and declares what time it starts and ends; appoints all committee members; is the representative of the fraternity for all on-campus groups and committees, college administrators, and off-campus organizations.

2. Lieutenant Commander (vice president)

Typically heads the internal operations, and is responsible for overseeing committee chairmen, often by chairing the Executive Council of other chapter officers. Serves in place of the Eminent Commander if he is not present.

3. Treasurer

Responsible for all chapter finances, dues, and payments.

4. Recorder (secretary)

Responsible for taking all notes during meetings and chapter correspondence.

5. Marshal (new member educator)

Responsible for the candidate education program and the general well being of the candidates; represents the new members to the chapter and vice versa.

Other positions include Chaplain (Brotherhood Chair, in some chapters) and Sentinel (Sergeant at arms). Another role unique to Sigma Nu is that of LEAD Officer, who oversees the fraternity's four-year leadership development program. A Serjeant at Arms (also spelt Sergeant at Arms, and sometimes Serjeant-at-Arms) is an officer appointed by a deliberative body, usually a legislature, to keep order during its meetings. ...


Full members of Sigma Nu are called knights, while new, uninitiated members (informally called "pledges") are referred to as candidates. (There is a third classification, known as "brother", that ranks between candidate and knight and is not considered full membership. What most fraternities refer to as "brothers" are called "knights" in Sigma Nu terminology.) Knights Dueling, by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ...


Alumni

Famous Sigma Nu alumni have included men of note in the arts, media, politics, sports, and numerous other fields. Some of the most well known are listed below.


Performing arts, literature, and media

  • Sean Hampton (Delta Mu) [8]
    Film and Television Actor
  • Doug Ying (Delta Phi)
    Author of critically acclaimed 2007 novel, "The Jone Dome". Other works include "Strange Fisherman", "Nice Eating Disorder", and "Short Haircut".
  • Murray Silver (Eta Gamma)
    Author and filmmaker, "Great Balls of Fire: The Uncensored Story of Jerry Lee Lewis"

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... An Emmy Award. ... The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ... Quiz show redirects here. ... A Master of Ceremonies or MC is the host of a staged event or other performance. ... Miss Universe is an annual international female beauty contest, and the title for the winner of the contest, founded in 1952 by California clothing company Pacific Mills. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Mark Schlabach is a columnist for ESPN.com. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... For the fictional character, see Midnight Cowboy. ... American Sportscasters A sportscaster, sports announcer, or sports commentator is a type of journalist on radio or television who specializes in reporting or commenting on sports events. ... This article is about the animal. ... For other persons named William Daniels, see William Daniels (disambiguation). ... St. ... Boy Meets World is an American television sitcom that chronicles the events and everyday life lessons of Cory Matthews, who grows up from a young boy to a married man. ... KITT on display at Universal Studios. ... For the American media company, see Knight Ridder. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Ripon College is also the name of a college in Yorkshire, England. ... This article is about the series. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Brian J. Mistler, B.A., B.S., M.A. (University of Bradford), is an American born philosopher and writer. ... Look up gestalt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dr. M. Pat Korb is founder and director of the Gestalt center of Gainesville in Gainesville, Florida. ... Zane Grey (January 31, 1872 – October 23, 1939) was an American author best known for his popular adventure novels and pulp fiction that presented an idealized image of the rugged Old West. ... Riders of the Purple Sage is Zane Greys best-known novel. ... Dave Guard (born Donald David Guard, 19 October 1934, in Honolulu, Hawaii - died 22 March 1991) was an American folk singer and original member of The Kingston Trio. ... The Kingston Trio is an American folk group, perhaps the single most prominent one. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Folk song redirects here. ... William Motter Inge (May 3, 1913 – June 10, 1973) was an American playwright and novelist, whose works feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... // The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... Splendor in the Grass, an American movie from 1961, tells a story of sexual repression. ... Wyatt Thomas (Tom) Johnson is an American journalist and media executive, best known for serving as president of Cable News Network (CNN) during the 1990s and, before that, as publisher of the Los Angeles Times newspaper. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Andy Luckey, born in San Francisco, California, 1965, is a Writer, Director and Producer. ... TMNT redirects here. ... Alan Richard Michaels (born November 12, 1944) is an American television sportscaster. ... Play-by-play, in broadcasting, is a North American term and means the reporting of a sporting event with a voiceover describing the details of the action of the game in progress. ... This article is about the television network. ... NBC Sunday Night Football is a weekly television broadcast of Sunday evening National Football League games on NBC that began airing on Sunday, August 6, 2006 with the pre-season opening Hall of Fame Game. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... MNF redirects here. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... NBA redirects here. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... This article is about the jazz musician. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Grammy Hall of Fame Award is a special Grammy award established in 1973 to honor recordings that are at least twenty-five years old and that have qualitative or historical significance. Alphabetical listing by title: List of Grammy Hall of Fame Award recipients A-D List of Grammy Hall... Tom Poston (October 17, 1921 – April 30, 2007) was an American television and film actor. ... An Emmy Award. ... “Steve Allen” redirects here. ... To Tell the Truth is also the title of Charles Robert Jenkins autobiography To Tell the Truth is an American television game show created by Bob Stewart[1] and produced by Goodson-Todman Productions that has been aired intermittently in various formats since 1956, hosted by various television personalities. ... Mork & Mindy was a sci-fi-based American sitcom broadcast from 1978 until 1982 on the American Broadcasting Company. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Burton Rascoe (October 22, 1892 - March 19, 1957), was an American journalist, editor and literary critic. ... Paul Stephen Rudd (born April 6, 1969) is an American film, television, and stage actor. ... Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy is an American comedy film which was released on July 9, 2004. ... Poster for The 40-Year-Old Virgin The 40-Year-Old Virgin is a comedy film starring Steve Carell that is set to be released on August 19, 2005. ... Clueless is a 1995 comedy film loosely based on Emma by Jane Austen, but set in a Beverly Hills high school. ... DVD cover The Shape of Things is a play by American author and film director Neil LaBute and a 2003 American movie. ... Joshua David Josh the Head Saviano (born March 31, 1976) is an American actor who played Kevin Arnolds best friend, Paul Joshua Pfeiffer, in the situation comedy The Wonder Years. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... The Wonder Years is an Emmy Award-winning US American television dramedy created by Carol Black and Neal Marlens. ... Shadoe Stevens at the 41st Emmy Awards Shadoe Stevens (born Terry Ingstad on November 3, 1947 in Jamestown, North Dakota) was the host of American Top 40, heard in 120 countries by an estimated one billion people a week, from 1988 to 1995. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... The American Top 40 logo American Top 40 (commonly abbreviated to AT40) is an internationally-syndicated, independent radio program created by Casey Kasem and Don Bustany. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Boyd Tinsley (b. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer-songwriter and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Kyle Martin Chandler (born September 17, 1965) is an Emmy-nominated American film and television actor. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy, and horror in film, television, and home video. ... Early Edition is a television series on CBS that ran from September 28, 1996 to May 27, 2000. ... For the film, see James Dean (film). ... Rebel Without a Cause is a 1955 film directed by Nicholas Ray that tells the story of a rebellious teenager who comes to a new town, meets a girl, defies his parents, and faces the local high school bullies. ... East of Eden is a 1955 movie, directed by Elia Kazan, and based on the novel of the same name by John Steinbeck. ... Giant is a 1956 film which tells the story of rival ranchers and oilmen in West Texas in the middle years of the 20th century. ... Chip Arndt (born October 2, 1966) was the winner of The Amazing Race 4 along with his then-husband, Reichen Lehmkuhl. ... Reichen Lehmkuhl (born Richard Lehmkuhl, December 26, 1973 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA) is an American former reality show winner, male model, and actor. ... Chace Crawford (born Christopher Chace Crawford on July 18, 1985) is an American actor best known for his role as Nate Archibald in Gossip Girl on The CW.[1] // Chace Crawford grew up in Plano, Texas. ... This article is about the book series. ...

Political figures

  • Ed Bryant (Epsilon Xi)
    Former U.S. Congressman from Tennessee 1994-2002, U.S. Senate candidate in 2002, 2006.

Chester Trent Lott Sr. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Daniel Robert Graham (born November 9, 1936) is an American politician. ... List of Governors of Florida: Florida Governors Military Government Territorial Government Statehood Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Florida | Government of Florida ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... DLA Piper (known until 4 September 2006 as DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary) is the third largest law firm in the world by number of attorneys after Clifford Chance and Baker & McKenzie. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Jim Gibbons may refer to: Jim Gibbons (United States politician) (born 1944), Republican governor of Nevada. ... This is a list of Governors of Nevada. ... Jim Newberry was elected Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky on November 7, 2006. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Bill Baarsma (Democrat) is the mayor of Tacoma, Washington. ... Nickname: Location of Tacoma in Pierce County and Washington State Coordinates: , Country State County Pierce Government  - Mayor Bill Baarsma (D) Area  - City  62. ... Ed Bryant (born September 7, 1948), American politician, is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Tennessee (1995 - 2003). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Congressman Roger F. Wicker Roger F. Wicker (born July 5, 1951) is an American politician and a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, a position he has held since 1995. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Sixth Congressional District of Washington Norman DeValois Dicks (born December 16, 1940), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1977, representing the Sixth Congressional District of Washington. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Joseph Jody Lester Powell (born 1943) is a U.S. administrator. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... A press secretary is a senior advisor (usually to a politician) who provides advice on how to deal with the media and, using news management techniques, helps them to maintain a positive public image and avoid negative media coverage. ... Clarence M. Kelley (October 24, 1911 - August 5, 1997) was a public servant and former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Herman Eugene Talmadge (August 9, 1913 - March 21, 2002) was an American politician who served as Governor of the U.S. state of Georgia briefly in 1947 and again from 1948 to 1955, and as a U.S. Senator from 1957 until 1981. ... This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Eugene Talmadge (September 23, 1884 – December 21, 1946) was a United States Democratic Party politician who served as governor of the U.S. state of Georgia from 1933 to 1937 and again from 1941 to 1943. ... This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... Joe Trippi (b. ... In United States and other democracies, political campaigns larger than a few individuals generally include a campaign manager whose role is to coordinate the campaigns operations. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Thomas Allen Tom Coburn, M.D. (born March 14, 1948) is a medical doctor and a Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Michael Dennis Antonovich (born 1939 in Los Angeles, California) is a member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors representing the Fifth District, which covers northern Los Angeles County, the Antelope, Santa Clarita, and parts of the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys. ... This article is about the Atlas Supervisor computer program. ... Eugene Clay Shaw Jr. ... GOP redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Quentin Northrup Burdick (June 19, 1908 – September 8, 1992) was a United States Senator from North Dakota from 1960 until his death in 1992. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Alan MacGregor Cranston (June 19, 1914 – December 31, 2000) was a U.S. journalist and politician. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Walter Franklin George (January 29, 1878 – August 24, 1957) was an American politician from the state of Georgia. ... Clifford Peter Hansen (born October 16, 1912) is a retired Republican American politician from the state of Wyoming. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... James Albertus McClure (born December 27, 1924) is an American politician from the state of Idaho, most notably serving as a Republican in the United States Senate. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Steve Symms Steven Douglas Symms was an American congressman (1973-1981) and U.S. senator (1981-1993) from the state of Idaho. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ...

Sports figures

  • Jason Glushon (Xi)
    Professional Baseball Player
  • Chet Jastremski (Beta Eta)
    1964 Olympic Bronze Medalist; made the cover of Sports Illustrated; member of the swimming hall of fame
  • Norm Johnson (Epsilon Pi)
    Ranks fifteenth all time in points scored in NFL history
  • Guy Lewis (Zeta Chi)
    University of Houston Basketball coach with 27 straight winning seasons
  • Wayne Munn (Delta Eta)
    World Heavyweight Wrestling Champion in 1925
  • Roy Skinner (Zeta Theta)
    Vanderbilt University Basketball coach (1961-1976); winningest coach in school history. Integrated the Southeastern Conference (SEC) basketball by signing the first black player, Perry Wallace.
  • Steve Stenstrom (Beta Chi)
    Stanford quarterback and a Heisman trophy candidate

Felix Doc Blanchard (born December 11, 1924 Bishopville, SC - ) was a running back for Army for 1944 to 1946. ... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ... Heisman redirects here. ... USMA redirects here. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... John I. Bitove, (Jr. ... The Toronto Raptors are a professional basketball team based in Toronto, Ontario. ... XM Radio Canada is the operating name of Canadian Satellite Radio Inc. ... Priszm LP, a limited partnership, is a Canadian fast food restaurant operator, based in Toronto. ... Painting by Daniel A. Moore on a stamp honoring Bryant. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... This article is about the sport. ... The College of William and Mary is a highly selective, coeducational, public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... The Washington Wizards are a National Basketball Association team based in Washington, D.C.. Founded: 1961 Formerly known as: Chicago Packers (1961_1962), Chicago Zephyrs (1962_1963), Baltimore Bullets (1963_1972), Capital Bullets (1973_1974), Washington Bullets (1974_1997) Home Arena: MCI Center Uniform colors: Blue, White, Gold, and Black Logo design: A blue stylized... Washington Bullets redirects here. ... 1961 NBA Draft Round One Round Two Round Three Categories: | ... Bobby Dodd (November 11, 1908–June 21, 1988) was an American college football coach at Georgia Tech. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... The Yellow Jackets is the name used for all of the intercollegiate athletic teams that play for the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... Walter Dropo (born January 30, 1923 in Moosup, Connecticut), nicknamed Moose, is a former Major League Baseball first baseman and right-handed batter who played with the Boston Red Sox (1949-52), Detroit Tigers (1952-54), Chicago White Sox (1955-58), Cincinnati Redlegs (1958-59), and Baltimore Orioles 1959-61). ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The Rookie: Norman Rockwells cover for The Saturday Evening Post Rookie is a term for a person who is in their first year of play of their sport and has little or no professional experience. ... The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball team located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... George Dallas Green (born August 4, 1934 in Newport, Delaware) is a former pitcher, manager and executive in Major League Baseball who is perhaps best known for his involvement with the Philadelphia Phillies. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42, Shea Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964-present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league titles World... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Al Groh (born July 13, 1944 in New York City, New York) is the current head coach of the University of Virginia college football team and the former head coach of the New York Jets of the NFL. Groh has over 38 years of professional and collegiate coaching experience; This... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... John Willard Hadl (born February 15, 1940 in Lawrence, Kansas) was a professional American football player. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... blah blah Modern athletic directors are often in a coaching misconduct being proven, often the athletic director will be terminated along with the offending coach. ... The sports teams at the University of Kansas are known as the Jayhawks. ... Richard Dalton (Dick) Howser (May 14, 1936 - June 17, 1987) was an American Major League Baseball shortstop and manager. ... Major league affiliations American League (1969–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 10, 20, 42 Name Kansas City Royals (1969–present) Other nicknames The Boys in Blue Ballpark Kauffman Stadium (1973–present) a. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Lindy Infante (born May 27, 1940) was head coach of the Green Bay Packers from 1988 to December 22, 1991 and of the Indianapolis Colts from 1996 to 1997. ... Packers redirects here. ... The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... American figure skater Hayes Alan Jenkins was born March 23, 1933. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... A gold medal will generally represent the highest award for achievement in a non-military field, with no restriction on eligibility. ... For other persons named Norman Johnson, see Norman Johnson (disambiguation). ... Stanley Paul Jones (born November 24, 1931 in Altoona, Pennsylvania) was an American football guard/defensive tackle in the NFL. He played for the Chicago Bears from 1954-1965 and the Washington Redskins in 1966. ... Guy V. Lewis (born in Arp, Texas, United States of America, March 19, 1922) was a highly succesful NCAA basketball coach for 30 years at the University of Houston. ... Thomas Franklin McDonald (born July 26, 1934) was a great running back for the University of Oklahoma. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Archie Elisha Manning (born May 19, 1949 in Drew, Mississippi) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... City New Orleans, Louisiana Team colors Gold and black Head Coach Sean Payton Owner Tom Benson and Rita Benson LeBlanc General manager Mickey Loomis Mascot Gumbo the dog League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1967–present) Eastern Conference (1967-1969) Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National Football Conference... Elisha Nelson Eli Manning (born January 3, 1981 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a professional American football player and the starting quarterback for the New York Giants of the NFL. He is the younger brother of Peyton Manning and Cooper Manning and the son of Archie Manning. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Super Bowl XLII will be the 42nd annual championship game of the National Football League (NFL) between the National Football Conference (NFC) and American Football Conference (AFC) champions. ... Michael Joseph McCormack (Born June 21, 1930) was a football player and coach who played with the Cleveland Browns from 1954-1962 and served as head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles and Baltimore Colts. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Wayne Munn was a professional wrestler. ... Richard Gerald Rick Neuheisel, Jr. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot The Ravens: Edgar, Allan, & Poe League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore... Orval Overall was a major league baseball pitcher during the early 1900s. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... For the American guitarist, see Patrick Riley. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Knicks redirects here. ... The Miami Heat (known as the HEAT [in all capital letters] on official team publications) is a professional basketball team based in Miami, Florida, United States. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... Frank Solich (born September 8, 1944 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, U.S.) is the head football coach of the Ohio Bobcats. ... Ohio University features 20 varsity sports teams called the Bobcats. ... The Nebraska Cornhuskers (often abbreviated to Huskers) is the name given to several sports teams of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. ... William Thomas Stanfill (born January 13, 1947) is a former defensive end for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Defensive end is the name of a defensive position in the sport of American football. ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966–1969) Eastern Division (1966–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC East (1970–present) Current uniform Team colors Aqua, Coral, Navy, White Mascot T. D. Personnel Owner H. Wayne Huizenga (50%) and Stephen M. Ross (50%) General Manager... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... Football Writers Association logo The Outland Trophy is awarded to the best United States college football interior lineman. ... The Georgia Bulldogs are the athletic teams of The University of Georgia. ... Steve Stenstrom (born December 23, 1971 in El Toro, California) is an American former professional football player. ... Forest Gregory Swindell (born January 2, 1965 Fort Worth, Texas - ) was a pitcher with a 17-year career from 1986 to 2002. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... Tommy Vardell (born February 20, 1969, in El Cajon, CA) is a former NFL fullback. ... Browns redirects here. ... P.J. Daniels was a star running back for Georgia Tech from 2002-2005. ... Gerald Louis Kramer (b. ... Packers redirects here. ... Right Guard is a type of deodorant for men. ... Billy Vessels (March 22, 1931, Cleveland, Oklahoma - November 17, 2001, Coral Gables, Florida) was an outstanding college football player and winner of the 1952 Heisman trophy, as well as a professional football player with the NFL Baltimore Colts and the Canadian Football League Edmonton Eskimos. ... Heisman redirects here. ... William Bill Yoast (born 1924) is an American high school football coach best known for being featured in the 2000 film Remember the Titans. ... Remember the Titans is an American drama film released in 2000. ...

Other famous members

  • Samuel Chud (Xi)
    Current CEO of Marshmallow Conglomerates.
  • Jack Katz (Epsilon Zeta)
    Founder and President of Panama Jack clothing and sunglasses
  • T. Jeremiah Beam
    5th master distiller of Jim Beam Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Neil Giuliano (Chapter Unknown, assume ASU need confirmation)
    Former mayor of Tempe, AZ, and current president of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation

Aflac Incorporated (NYSE: AFL, TYO: 8686 ) sells supplemental health and life insurance in the United States and Japan. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Aflac Incorporated (NYSE: AFL, TYO: 8686 ) sells supplemental health and life insurance in the United States and Japan. ... Vance DeVoe Brand is a former NASA astronaut. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project was the first joint flight of the US and Soviet space programs. ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... STS-5 was a space shuttle mission by NASA using the Space Shuttle Columbia, launched November 11, 1982. ... // Crew Vance Brand (flew on Apollo-Soyuz, STS-5, STS-41-B & STS-35), Commander Robert L. 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Chapters

This article lists the chapters of Sigma Nu fraternity. ...

External links

  • eZine: The Digital Delta
  • Sigma Nu National Website:Sigma Nu Headquarters

References

  1. ^ Announced:http://www.sigmanu.org/fraternity/ourhistory/#announced
  2. ^ Expands:http://www.sigmanu.org/fraternity/ourhistory/#expands
  3. ^ National Convention:http://www.sigmanu.org/fraternity/ourhistory/#convention
  4. ^ Move West:http://www.sigmanu.org/fraternity/ourhistory/#west
  5. ^ Headquarters:http://www.sigmanu.org/fraternity/ourhistory/#established
  6. ^ Founders Death:http://www.sigmanu.org/fraternity/ourhistory/#eternal
  7. ^ Education:http://www.sigmanu.org/fraternity/ourhistory/#foundation
  8. ^ [1], February 2008
  9. ^ Zeta Kappa Famous Sigma Nu List, November 2007
  10. ^ a b The Digital Delta of Sigma Nu, June 2007, p. 23-24
  11. ^ Sigma Nu Fraternity: Eastern Kentucky University
  12. ^ Sigma Nu Fraternity: Eastern Kentucky University

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sigma Nu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4268 words)
Although the Sigma Nu Fraternity began in October 1868 as the Legion of Honor, its existence was kept secret until the founders publicly announced their new society on the first day of January 1869, the accepted birth date of Sigma Nu.
Sigma Nu established a chapter at North Georgia Agricultural College in 1881, soon after Georgia's law was repealed.
Sigma Nu is governed by a biennial national convention known as Grand Chapter, which elects the national officers and votes on legislation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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