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Encyclopedia > Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Epsilon - ΣΑΕ
Image:Saecoat.png
Founded March 9, 1856
University of Alabama
Type Social
Scope National
Mission Statement The mission of Sigma Alpha Epsilon is to promote the highest standards of friendship, scholarship, and service for our members based upon the ideals set forth by our Founders and as specifically enunciated in our creed.
Motto Phi Alpha
Colors Royal Purple and Old Gold
Symbol Lion, The Phoenix, Minerva, Fleur-de-lis
Flower Violet
Publication The Record, The Phi Alpha
Chapters 250+
Members 8,000+ currently
280,000+ lifetime
Headquarters 1856 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL, USA
Homepage http://www.sae.net

Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. Founded in 1856 , it has initiated more men since its founding than any other fraternity with more than 282,000 initiated members.[citation needed] At present, SAE (as it is nicknamed) has more than 8,200 undergraduates at more than 250 chapters in 48 states. It was the first fraternity to establish a national headquarters (Levere Memorial Temple, 1929), a national Leadership School (1935), a national Men's Health Issues Committee (1980), and a career-development program tailored for the community ("The Leading Edge" in 1990). In historical scholarship, a primary source is a document, or other source of information that was created at or near the time being studied, by an authoritative source, usually one with direct personal knowledge of the events being described. ... In library and information science, historiography and some other areas of scholarship, a secondary source is a document or recording that relates or discusses information originally presented elsewhere. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... Royal Purple is a company that specializes in the manufacture of multipurpose fully-synthetic lubricants. ... Old Gold is a dark yellow, which varies from light olive or olive brown to deep or strong yellow. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 For other uses, see Minerva (disambiguation). ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... Species List of Viola species Violets (Viola) are a genus of flowering plants in the family Violaceae, with around 400-500 species throughout the world, mainly in the temperate Northern Hemisphere but also in Hawaii, Australasia, and the Andes in South America. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


Currently, the Fraternity offers a comprehensive member-education program called The True Gentleman Initiative. The Fraternity communicates through The Record, a quarterly publication that has been published continuously since 1880 . New members receive a copy of The Phoenix, the manual of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, for educational development.[citation needed]

Contents

History

Sigma Alpha Epsilon was founded on March 9, 1856, at the University of Alabama located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Its founders were Noble Leslie DeVotie, Nathan Elams Cockrell, John Barratt Rudulph, John Webb Kerr, Samuel Marion Dennis, Wade Hampton Foster, Abner Edwin Patton and Thomas Chappell Cook. Their leader was DeVotie, who wrote the ritual, created the grip, and chose the name. Rudulph designed the badge. Of all existing fraternities today, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is the only one founded in the antebellum South.[citation needed] is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... Tuscaloosa is a city in west central Alabama in the southern United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

The Founding of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
The Founding of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

Founded in a time of intense sectional feeling, Sigma Alpha Epsilon confined its growth to the southern states. By the end of 1857, the fraternity numbered seven chapters. Its first national convention met in the summer of 1858 at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, with four of its eight chapters in attendance. By the time of the outbreak of the US Civil War in 1861, fifteen chapters had been established.[citation needed] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy...


The fraternity had fewer than 400 members when the Civil War began. Of those, 369 went to war for the Confederacy, and seven fought with the Union forces. Seventy four members of the fraternity lost their lives in the War, including Noble DeVotie. DeVotie, who served as Chaplain in the Confederate Army is noted as the first Alabama soldier to lose his life in the 'War of Rebellion'.[citation needed] After the Civil War, only one chapter at tiny Columbian College in Washington, D.C., survived. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... A chaplain in the 45th Infantry Division leads a Christmas Day service in Italy, 1943. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


When a few of the young veterans returned to the Georgia Military Institute and found their college burned to the ground, they decided to enter the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia. Founding a chapter there at the end of 1865, along with the re-establishment of the chapter at the University of Virginia, led to the fraternity's revival. Soon, other chapters came back to life and, in 1867, the first post-war convention was held at Nashville, Tennessee, where a half-dozen revived chapters planned the fraternity's future growth. The Georgia Military Institute was established on 110 acres a mile from Marietta, Georgia on July 1, 1851. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ...


In the 1870s and early 1880s, more than a score of new chapters were formed. Older chapters died as fast as new ones were established. By 1886, the fraternity had chartered 49 chapters, but few were active. The first northern chapter had been established at Pennsylvania College (now Gettysburg College), in 1883 , and a second was placed at Mount Union College in Ohio two years later. Gettysburg College is a private national four-year liberal arts college founded in 1832, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, adjacent to the famous battlefield. ... Mount Union College is a 4-year private, liberal arts college in Alliance, Ohio. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ...


Soon after, a 16-year-old Harry Bunting entered Southwestern Presbyterian University in Clarksville, Tennessee, now known as Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee. He was initiated into the Tennessee Zeta Chapter, which had previously initiated two of his brothers. In just eight years, under the guidance of Harry Bunting and his younger brother, George, they provoked Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapters to increase their membership. They wrote encouraging articles in the fraternity's quarterly journal, The Record, promoting better chapter standards. Above all, they gave new life to old chapters in the South (including the mother chapter at Alabama) and founded new ones in the North and West. In an explosion of growth, the Buntings were responsible for founding nearly 50 chapters of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Other chapters during this time were also founded, mostly by local undergraduates, at Dickinson College, Ohio State University, Harvard University, and Bucknell University, among others. When Harry Bunting founded the Northwestern University chapter in 1894 , he initiated as a charter member William Collin "Billy" Levere. Bunting passed the torch of leadership to Levere, and for the next three decades, Levere's high spirits brought the fraternity to maturity. For other uses, see Clarksville (disambiguation). ... Rhodes College is a four-year, private liberal arts college located in Memphis, Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... A mermaid sits atop Dickinson Colleges Old West. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Bucknell University is a private university located along the Susquehanna River in the rolling countryside of Central Pennsylvania in the town of Lewisburg, 60 miles (97 km) north of Harrisburg. ... Northwestern University (NU) is a selective private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ...


When Levere died on February 22, 1927, the fraternity's Supreme Council decided to name the new national headquarters building The Levere Memorial Temple. Construction of the Temple, an immense German Gothic structure located near Lake Michigan and across from the Northwestern University campus, was started in 1929, and the building was dedicated in the winter of 1930.[citation needed] is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... --67. ...


When the Supreme Council met regularly in the early 1930s at the Temple, educator John O. Moseley, the fraternity's national president, lamented that, "We have in the Temple a magnificent school-house. Why can we not have a school?" Accordingly, the economic depression notwithstanding, in the summer of 1935, the fraternity's first Leadership School was held under the direction of Moseley. In the last years of Moseley's life, he served the fraternity as its executive secretary, capping an academic career that had included two college presidencies.[citation needed]


The True Gentleman

The True Gentleman is the man whose conduct proceeds from good will and an acute sense of propriety, and whose self-control is equal to all emergencies; who does not make the poor man conscious of his poverty, the obscure man of his obscurity, or any man of his inferiority or deformity; who is himself humbled if necessity compels him to humble another; who does not flatter wealth, cringe before power, or boast of his own possessions or achievements; who speaks with frankness but always with sincerity and sympathy; whose deed follows his word; who thinks of the rights and feelings of others, rather than his own; and who appears well in any company, a man with whom honor is sacred and virtue safe.
—John Walter Wayland (Virginia Omicron Chapter 1899)

The True Gentleman is the creed of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, which was first adopted by the fraternity sometime in the 1930s. However, it wasn't until the 2001 Fraternity Convention in Orlando, Florida that it was officially adopted as the organization's creed. The definition was discovered by Judge Walter B. Jones, who first came upon it in an Alabama Baptist quarterly of which he was the editor. He sent a copy of it to John O. Moseley, the leader of the annual Leadership Schools, who was quite taken with it. Moseley began using it at the schools. For many years, the author of it was thought to be anonymous until the 1970s when the editor of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon pledge manual, The Phoenix, Joseph Walt, discovered that the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis also used it in a manual. The author was denoted there as one John Walter Wayland. "The True Gentleman" had actually first appeared in The Baltimore Sun as part of a competition for the best definition of a true gentleman with Wayland's submission being crowned the winner.


With his family's approval, John Walter Wayland was posthumously initiated into SAE during the Fraternity's 66th annual Leadership School in Chicago. The Virginia Omicron chapter at the University of Virginia was selected as Wayland's chapter since he had completed his master's degree at that institution in 1901. Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ...


The Levere Memorial Temple

The Levere Memorial Temple in Evanston, IL.
The Levere Memorial Temple in Evanston, IL.

The fraternity's international headquarters, known as the Fraternity Service Center, is maintained at the Levere Memorial Temple in Evanston, Illinois. Honoring all the members of the fraternity who have served their countries in the armed forces since 1856, it was dedicated on December 28, 1930. The Temple also contains what is considered the most complete library pertaining to Greek-letter fraternities and sororities.[citation needed] The museum on the first floor is devoted to a collection of interesting historical photographs, pictures, and collections from private sources. The walls of the building are hung with oil portraits of distinguished members. The basement contains the Panhellenic Room, on the ceiling of which are the coats-of-arms of 40 college fraternities and 17 sororities, while the niches on the north side contain large murals showing the founding of Phi Beta Kappa in 1776 and that of Sigma Alpha Epsilon in 1856, together with other murals depicting episodes in the history of the fraternity. Perhaps the most outstanding mural in the Panhellenic Room is the reproduction of Raphael's The School of Athens, painted by Johannes Waller in the 1930s. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The School of Athens or in Italian is one of the most famous paintings by the Italian Renaissance artist Raphael. ...


The building continues to be used for ceremonies and receptions by the various fraternities, sororities, and honor societies at Northwestern University. The impressive chapel of the Temple, with its soaring vaulted ceiling and stained glass windows by Tiffany is used regularly for religious services, and has been the scene of many weddings of Evanstonians and members of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. In fact, the entire building is open to the public for patriotic, religious, and educational purposes, while the library is also free to scholars seeking material pertaining to the history of any or all college fraternities and college organizations.


Government

In its early days, the government of the fraternity was vested in one chapter, designated the Grand Chapter. The first such chapter was North Carolina Xi at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which was responsible only to the general convention, the last was Tennessee Omega at the University of the South, in Sewanee, Tennessee. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... The University of the South The University of the South is located in Sewanee, Tennessee, and is a private, coeducational liberal arts college. ...


Today, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is governed by National Conventions which are held biannually. Here, brothers from all over the country come together to vote on additions and changes to the Fraternity Laws and to elect the Board of Directors. Between Conventions, SAE is governed by a Board of Directors, known as the Supreme Council. This is composed of the Eminent Supreme Archon, Eminent Supreme Deputy Archon, Eminent Supreme Warden, Eminent Supreme Herald, and Eminent Supreme Chronicler. The Executive Director of SAE (A full-time staff position), the Chief Operating Officer, holds the title of Eminent Supreme Recorder.


In addition, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is governed through Province Conventions. A province is a section, or district, of the country which is composed of nearby chapters. These provinces meet regularly to discuss issues concerning its individual chapters. These provinces are led by a Province Archon.


The Record

The fraternity communicates through The Record magazine. It is published quarterly and has been continuously since 1880 . This publication has become popular in social groups throughout the country. One issue of The Record, the fall annual report, is provided free of charge to all active members and alumni at a circulation of 180,000. The other three issues are provided for active members and current donors to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation at a circulation of approximately 30,000.


Chapter List

See List of Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapters. This is a list of Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapters. ...


Famous SAEs

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Literature

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Television & Movies

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Beau Bridges, (born Lloyd Vernet Bridges III on December 9, 1941 in Los Angeles, California), is an American actor. ... Bridges in The Sound of Fury (1950) Lloyd Vernet Bridges, Jr. ... Samuel Pack Elliott (born August 9, 1944) is an American film and television actor. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... Millikin University, also known as MU (official abbreviation), is a co-ed, independent, 4-year university, with studies in Arts & Sciences, Business, Fine Arts, and Nursing, as well as Professional Adult Comprehensive Education (PACE) and Masters of Business Administration and Nursing programs. ... That 70s Show logo That 70s Show is a Fox Network television sitcom centered around the lives of a group of teenagers living in the fictional suburb of Point Place, near Green Bay, during the late 1970s. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... Robert Kuehl Goen (born December 1, 1954) is a American game show emcee and a popular television personality, best known as the reporter and sub anchor, before being co-anchor to Mary Hart & Jann Carl on the long-running newsmagazine program, Entertainment Tonight, on which he stayed on the show... Joshua Holmes of Bumpshack. ... Richard Kind (b. ... Matt Long (born May 18, 1980) is an American actor. ... Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a public university in Bowling Green, Kentucky. ... Michael Owen Rosenbaum (born July 11, 1972) is an American actor. ... Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a public university in Bowling Green, Kentucky. ... Frederick Aaron Savage (born July 9, 1976) is an Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award-nominated American actor and television and film director. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Grant Shaud (born Edward Shaud III on February 27, 1961) is an American actor best known for playing the character of Miles Silverberg on the 1990s TV sitcom Murphy Brown. ... The University of Richmond is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts university located on the border of the city of Richmond and Henrico County, Virginia. ... David Wayne Spade (born July 22, 1964) is an Emmy-Award and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, comedian, television personality who gained fame in the 1990s as a cast member on Saturday Night Live. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... Kevin Tighe (born August 13, 1944 in Los Angeles) is an American actor best remembered for his role as Roy DeSoto on the TV series Emergency! from 1972 to 1979. ... Robert Young or Bob Young may refer to several different people: Robert J Young (historian) Robert Young (politician) (1834–1904), New Brunswick politician and businessman Robert Young (Biblical scholar), author of Youngs Literal Translation of the Bible Robert Young (actor) (1907-1998), star of US television programs Father Knows... Paul James is an actor on the ABC Family television show GRΣΣK. Paul James at the Internet Movie Database Category: ... GRΣΣK (or Greek) is a teen drama television series that runs on the ABC Family network. ...

Music

Dierks Bentley (born November 20, 1975 in Phoenix, Arizona) is a country music singer-songwriter. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... This section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the baseball player, see George McConnell (baseball). ... Widespread Panic is a southern rock band from Athens, Georgia. ... Robert Lee Bobby Hatfield (August 10, 1940 – November 5, 2003), was one half of The Righteous Brothers singing duo. ...

Print & Broadcast Journalism

David Wilson Campbell (born January 14, 1942 in Manistee, Michigan) is a former American baseball player and current sportscaster. ... Philip L. Graham & Eugene I. Meyer Philip Leslie Graham (July 18, 1915 – August 3, 1963) was publisher of The Washington Post from 1946 to 1963. ... ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Ernie Harwell William Earnest Ernie Harwell (born January 25, 1918 in Washington, Georgia) is a former American sportscaster, known for his long career calling play-by-play of Major League Baseball games. ... Edward Talmage Hinton (born July 21, 1948 in Laurel, Mississippi) is one of the most well-known and respected motor racing sportswriters in the United States and around the world. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... The Orlando Sentinel is the primary newspaper of the Orlando, Florida region. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ernie Pyle on board the U.S.S. Cabot. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ...

Business

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Education

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Government

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Claiborne (Democrat) (25 May 1801–1 March 1805) Robert Williams (Democrat) (1 March 1805–7 March 1809) David Holmes (Democrat) (7 March 1809–10 December 1817) Governors... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ... Max Sieben Baucus (b. ... University of California, Los Angeles The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university located in the residential area of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... F. Allen Boyd Jr. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[7] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ... James Warren DeMint (born September 2, 1951) has been a U.S. Senator from South Carolina since 2005. ... 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Paul Eugene Gillmor (born February 1, 1939) is an American politician of the Republican party who serves as a U.S. representative from the fifth congressional district of Ohio. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... William Augustus Guy (13 June 1810 - 10 September 1885) was a British physician and medical statistician. ... North Dakota State University (NDSU) is a public university in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S. It is the second largest school in the eleven campus North Dakota University System. ... John J. Hickey (August 22, 1911–September 22, 1970) was an American politician who served as a U.S. Senator from Wyoming. ... Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ... John Hardy Johnny Isakson (born December 28, 1944), American politician, has been a Republican United States Senator from Georgia since 2005. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Gary Johnson may refer to: Gary Johnson - International Recording Artist from Sylvan Beach, NY. See also =The Johnson= Gary E. Johnson, a U.S. politician Gary Johnson, an English football manager Gary Johnson (baseball player) Gary Big Hands Johnson, former football player Category: ... The University of New Mexico (UNM) is a public university in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ... This article is about the footballer. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar (September 17, 1825 – January 23, 1893) was a politician and jurist from Mississippi. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... For other persons named John Lynch, see John Lynch (disambiguation). ... University of New Hampshire (UNH) is a public university in the University System of New Hampshire (USNH). ... Connie Mack III Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy III (born October 29, 1940 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), known as Connie Mack for short, is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from 1983 to 1989 and of the United States Senate from 1989 to 2001, all from Florida. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Sid McMath, from the cover of his autobiography Promises Kept (University of Arkansas Press, 2003) Sidney Sanders McMath (June 14, 1912–October 4, 2003) was a U.S. Marine hero and progressive Democratic reform Governor of the State of Arkansas (1949–1953), United States, who, in defiance of... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... General Richard B. Myers General Richard Bowman Myers (born March 1, 1942) of the United States Air Force is a former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Americas highest ranking military officer. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... Eliot Ness Eliot P. Ness (April 19, 1903 – May 16, 1957) was an American Prohibition agent, famous for his efforts to enforce Prohibition in Chicago, Illinois as the leader of a legendary team nicknamed The Untouchables. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Counter Assault Team. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... Henry Paulson Henry Hank Merritt Paulson Jr. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Larry Lee Pressler (b. ... The University of South Dakota is the state’s oldest university founded in 1862, although classes didnt start until 1882. ... David Hampton Pryor David Hampton Pryor (born August 29, 1934) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives and United States Senator from the State of Arkansas. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... Mark Lunsford Pryor (born January 10, 1963) is a politician in Arkansas. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... Robert D. Ray (Born September 26, 1928 in Des Moines, Iowa) was the Republican governor of Iowa, from 1969-83. ... This is a list of Governors of Iowa: See also Iowa Iowa Territory Governors of Iowa Territory Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Iowa ... Drake University is a private, co-educational university located in the city of Des Moines, Iowa. ... Ralph Straus Regula (born December 3, 1924) is a Representative in the United States Congress from the 16th District of the State of Ohio (map), elected to his 17th term in November 2004. ... Mount Union College is a 4-year private, liberal arts college in Alliance, Ohio. ... Richard Wilson Riley (born January 2, 1933), American politician, was the United States Secretary of Education under President Bill Clinton as well as the Governor of South Carolina, is a member of the Democratic Party. ... The Bell Tower Furman University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university in Greenville, South Carolina, United States. ... Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ... Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Virginia. ... Gerald R. Jerry Sanders (born c. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... San Diego State University (SDSU), founded in 1897 as San Diego Normal School, is the largest and oldest higher education facility in the greater San Diego area (generally the City and County of San Diego), and is part of the California State University system. ... Kenneth D. Schisler (Born July 31, 1969), is a former member of the Maryland House of Delegates and former chair of the Maryland Public Service Commission. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Salisbury University Salisbury University (Salisbury State University prior to 2001) is a nationally accredited, four-year comprehensive public university located in the city of Salisbury, Maryland on the Delmarva Peninsula. ... John Shadegg John Barden Shadegg (born October 22, 1949), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1995, representing the 3rd District of Arizona (map). ... The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ... George Smathers George Armistead Smathers (born November 14, 1913) is an American lawyer and politician who represented Florida in the United States Senate for eighteen years, from 1951 until 1969, as a member of the Democratic Party. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Louis R. Tobacco is a member of the New York State Assembly representing Staten Islands 62nd District. ...

Science

Dr. Robert D. Ballard Robert Duane Ballard, Ph. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... The German battleship Bismarck is one of the most famous warships of the Second World War. ... This article discusses the ancient goddess Isis. ... James Stephen Fossett (born April 22, 1944 - missing since September 3, 2007) is an American aviator, sailor and adventurer. ... William Anthony Bill Oefelein (IPA pronunciation: oʊfɛlaɪn,) (born March 29, 1965) is an American Naval officer and former NASA astronaut. ... Robert Hutchings Goddard (1882-1945) Robert Hutchings Goddard (October 5, 1882 – August 10, 1945), U.S. professor and scientist, was a pioneer of controlled, liquid-fueled rocketry. ... Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is a private university located in Worcester, Massachusetts, in the United States. ...

Sports

Francis Asbury Tarkenton (born February 3, 1940) is a former American football player, TV personality, and computer software executive. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Andy Douglas (born October 11, 1978) is an American professional wrestler, best known for working with Total Nonstop Action Wrestling as one half of The Naturals with Chase Stevens. ... Morehead State University is a public, co-educational university located in Morehead, Kentucky. ... Charles Walter Terrell (born May 11, 1958 in Jeffersonville, Indiana) is a former starting pitcher with a 11 year career from 1982 to 1992. ... Morehead State University is a public, co-educational university located in Morehead, Kentucky. ... Harry Agganis - Topps baseball card - 1955 Series, #152 Aristotle George (Harry) Agganis (April 20, 1929 - June 27, 1955) nicknamed The Golden Greek, was an American athletic star in two sports. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Chris Ault (born November 8, 1946 in San Bernardino, California), is the current college football head coach of the University of Nevada Wolf Pack. ... The University of Nevada, Reno (Nevada or UNR) is a university located in Reno, Nevada and is known for its programs in agricultural research, animal biotechnology, and mining-related engineering and natural sciences. ... The phrase University of Nevada by itself usually refers to the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), because that was the name by which it was known from the time of its founding in 1874 until its name was changed to University of Nevada, Reno in 1969, at the same time... // Andy Bean (born March 13, 1953 in LaFayette, Georgia) ia an American professional golfer who has won numerous tournaments at both the amateur and professional level including 11 PGA Tour victories. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Scott Boras (born November 2, 1952 in Elk Grove, California, USA) is a sports agent for professional baseball players. ... Not to be confused with Pacific University. ... Don Anthony Tony Boselli, Jr. ... The ball used in American football has a pointed oval shape, and usually has a large set of stitches along one side. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Douglas Robert Brien (born November 24, 1970) was an American football placekicker. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... William Mack Brown (born August 27, 1951) is head coach of the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... Hook em Horns, the UT hand symbol and slogan The UT Tower lit in a special configuration in honor of the 2005 National Championship football team Texas Longhorn Athletics programs include the extramural and intramural sports teams of University of Texas at Austin. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[7] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Bob and Mike Bryan. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Michael (Mike) Carl Bryan (born April 29, 1978 in Camarillo, California) is an American male professional tennis player. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Kenneth Gene Caminiti (April 21, 1963 – October 10, 2004) was an American third baseman in Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the sport. ... San Jose State University San José State University, commonly shortened to San Jose State and SJSU, is the oldest university in what became the California State University system. ... Peter C. Carroll (born September 15, 1951, in San Francisco, California) is the current head coach of the University of Southern California Trojans football team, having held that position since 2001. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Not to be confused with Pacific University. ... This institution is unrelated, other than by similarity of name, to the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky. ... San Jose State University San José State University, commonly shortened to San Jose State and SJSU, is the oldest university in what became the California State University system. ... Paul Dietzel (Born September 5, 1924, in Fremont, Ohio) is a former college football head coach at LSU, Army and South Carolina. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Dennis Erickson (born March 24, 1947, in Everett, Washington) is the head coach of the Arizona State Sun Devils football team. ... The Montana State University System was created on July 1, 1994, when the Montana Board of Regents of Higher Education restructured the states colleges and universities into two umbrella universities, Montana State University System and the University of Montana. ... Stanford redirects here. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... Ryan F. Garko (b. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Joseph Salvatore Gilbert (b. ... The phrase University of Nevada by itself usually refers to the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), because that was the name by which it was known from the time of its founding in 1874 until its name was changed to University of Nevada, Reno in 1969, at the same time... Robert Bryan Gilder (born December 31, 1950) is an American professional golfer. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... Robert Goddard is the name of several notable individuals, including: Robert Goddard (scientist) (1882-1945), one of the pioneers of modern rocketry. ... Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is a private university located in Worcester, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Michael F. Gosling (born September 30, 1980, in Madison, Wisconsin) is a Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher. ... Stanford redirects here. ... George Melvin Jud Heathcote is a former college basketball coach. ... Philip Douglas Phil Jackson (born September 17, 1945 in Deer Lodge, Montana) is the current coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, an American professional basketball team. ... The University of North Dakota (UND) is a comprehensive, public university in Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA. UND is the largest and oldest university in the state of North Dakota. ... Bobby Jones won the first Grand Slam of golf in 1930. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... Peter Press Maravich (June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988) was a Serb-American basketball player known for his dazzling ballhandling, incredible shooting abilities, and creative passing. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... Ron Mason (born January 14, 1940, in Blyth, Ontario, Canada) is a former collegiate ice hockey player and head coach. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... Edward T. McCaffrey (born August 17, 1968 in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania) is a former American football wide receiver who played for the New York Giants (1991-1993), San Francisco 49ers (1994) and the Denver Broncos (1995-2003) of the NFL. // McCaffrey played high school football at Allentown Central Catholic High School... The ball used in American football has a pointed oval shape, and usually has a large set of stitches along one side. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Kevin S. McClatchy (born January 13, 1963 in Sacramento, CA) has been part-owner and General Partner of the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team since 1996. ... This article is about the baseball team. ... Patrick McEnroe (born July 1, 1966) is an American former professional tennis player and the present Captain of the United States Davis Cup team. ... Stanford redirects here. ... City New Orleans, Louisiana Team colors Old Gold, Black, and White Head Coach Sean Payton Owner Tom Benson and Rita Benson LeBlanc General manager Mickey Loomis Mascot Gumbo the dog League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1967–present) Eastern Conference (1967-1969) Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National... The Mecom Racing Team was led by John Mecom Jr. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... Graig Nettles (born August 20, 1944, in San Diego, California) (nicknamed Puff) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman and left-handed batter who played for the Minnesota Twins (1967-69), Cleveland Indians (1970-72), New York Yankees (1973-83), San Diego Padres (1984-86), Atlanta Braves (1987) and... San Diego State University (SDSU), founded in 1897 as San Diego Normal School, is the largest and oldest higher education facility in the greater San Diego area (generally the City and County of San Diego), and is part of the California State University system. ... John Offerdahl (born August 17, 1964) was an American Football linebacker who played his entire eight year career with the National Football League Miami Dolphins from 1986 to 1993. ... Western Michigan University (abbr. ... Carson Palmer (born December 27, 1979 in Fresno, California), is an American football quarterback for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Todd Peterson (born February 4, 1970 in Washington, D.C.) is an American football place kicker in the NFL, who most recently played with the Atlanta Falcons. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... // Tom Purtzer (born December 5, 1951) is an American professional golfer who has won tournaments on both the PGA Tour and the Champions Tour. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... Dallas Sartz (born July 8, 1983) is an American football linebacker for the Washington Redskins. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Glenn Edward Bo Schembechler (April 1, 1929 – November 17, 2006) was an American college football coach best known as the head coach at the University of Michigan, where he coached the Wolverines from 1969 until 1989. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... The ball used in American football has a pointed oval shape, and usually has a large set of stitches along one side. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Drew Emeric Stanton (born May 7, 1984) is a National Football League quarterback (QB) for the Detroit Lions. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... Adam Seward (born June 15, 1982 in Las Vegas, Nevada) is an American football linebacker who currently plays for the Carolina Panthers of the NFL. Seward was drafted by Carolina in the 5th round (149th overall) of the 2005 NFL Draft. ... “UNLV” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Eastern Conference (1960-1969) Capitol Division (1967-1969) National... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university situated in the neighborhood of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ...

Misc.

Biography [[1]]Spencer Bailey was born on August 18, 1985. ... United Airlines Flight 232 was a scheduled flight operated by United Airlines between Denver and Philadelphia via Chicago. ... A mermaid sits atop Dickinson Colleges Old West. ... George Horace Gallup (November 18, 1901 – July 26, 1984), American statistician, invented the Gallup poll, a successful statistical method of survey sampling for measuring public opinion. ... The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or locally UI, is a major coeducational research university located on a 1,900 acre (8 km²) campus in Iowa City, Iowa, US, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ... Frank Reed Horton, the founder of Alpha Phi Omega. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ... Lafayette College is a private coeducational liberal arts college located in Easton, Pennsylvania, USA. The school, founded in 1826 by citizens of Easton, first began holding classes in 1832. ...

External links

  • Official website

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Sigma Alpha Epsilon - HOME (380 words)
SAE was the first national fraternity to be established in the deep south, having been founded at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, on 9 March 1856.
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SAE has an awards program to recognize outstanding contributions of SAE alumni, undergraduates, chapters, and others to the development of individuals and to the betterment of life in their community.
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