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Encyclopedia > Siesta
A painting of a young woman taking a siesta. (The hammock, Gustave Courbet (1844).)

A siesta (IPA: [siˈɛstə], original Spanish pronunciation ['sjest̪a]) is a short nap taken in the early afternoon, often after the midday meal. Such a period of sleep is a common tradition in hot countries. The word siesta is Spanish, from the Latin hora sexta - "the sixth hour" (counting from dawn, therefore noon, hence "midday rest"). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2536x1836, 424 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Siesta User:Rl/Images ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2536x1836, 424 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Siesta User:Rl/Images ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Nap or nap can refer to: a short sleep. ... For the coarsely ground flour, see flour. ... For other uses, see Sleep (disambiguation). ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...

Contents

Origins of the Iberian siesta

The siesta is the traditional daily sleep of the Southern region of Alentejo, in Portugal, known as sesta. It was adopted also by the Spanish and, through Spanish influence, by Latin American countries. Afternoon sleep is also a common habit in China, India, Italy ("riposo" in Italian), Greece, Croatia, Malta, The Middle East and North Africa. In these countries, the heat can be unbearable in the early afternoon, making a midday break in the comfort of one's home ideal. However, in some countries where naps are taken, such as Northern Spain, Southern Argentina, and Chile, the climate is similar to that of Canada and Northern Europe. Besides the climate, in many countries with this habit it is common to have the largest meal of the day in the afternoon, in contrast with other countries where only a lighter lunch is taken. Thus, a siesta may also be a natural result of this large meal. NUTS II Alentejo region. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... North Africa is the Mediterranean, northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ...


The original concept of a siesta was merely that of a midday break. This break was intended to allow people time to be spent with their friends and family. A nap was not necessarily part of the daily affair of a siesta.


Others suggest that the long length of the modern siesta dates back to the Spanish Civil War, when poverty resulted in many Spaniards working multiple jobs at irregular hours, pushing back meals to later in the afternoon and evening. 1 However, this hypothesis sounds unlikely, considering that the siesta tradition is very common in Latin America and other countries with Hispanic influence, much before the Spanish Civil War. It has been suggested that Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War be merged into this article or section. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ...


Although colonized by Portugal, being part of South America, and clearly dominated by equatorial to tropical climate, Brazil stands in glaring cultural contrast in regards to the adoption of an afternoon nap.


The afternoon nap

A steel yard worker enjoying his Siesta on steel bars and a gunnybag in Whitefield steel yard,Bangalore, India

Today, the term "siesta" refers to a short nap (15 to 30 minutes) taken after the midday meal. Siestas are traditionally no longer than 30 minutes and are more of a light rest than any kind of serious sleep. Other names for a siesta may include: cat nap, snooze, doze, kip, winks, power nap, or simply, afternoon nap. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2128 × 2832 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2128 × 2832 pixel, file size: 2. ... , Bangalore (Bengalūru) (Kannada: ; pronunciation: in Kannada and in English) is the capital of the Indian state of Karnataka. ... A power nap (sometimes called a catnap) is a short nap, usually 15-20 minutes, coined by Cornell University social psychologist James Maas. ...


In Argentina, the siesta is supposed to be between 13:00 and 16:00, and in some regions, such as Santiago del Estero, it's called "sacred" because people don't want to be disturbed. Business hours in these regions are usually 8:00 to 12:00 and 16:00 to 20:00. Other business hours (extended) vary between 6:00 to 13:00 and from 15:00 to 21:00, but most either add or shift 30 minutes to the regular 8-12/16-20 times. In bigger cities such as Buenos Aires, and with the time and money it takes to commute, businesses just use the regular 9-to-6 time. For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ...


In Malta, business hours are usually between 9:00 and 12:30 and from 16:00 to 19:00 to enable workmen to return home during the break, have lunch and possibly take a siesta. Due to the shortness of distance between the place of business and their residence, this practice is not uncommon.


Older, pre-teenage children are usually incapable of napping, but acquire the ability to nap as teenagers.[1] Some people sleep the whole time (up to two hours), but most people watch television or take a short 15 to 30 minute nap. In any case, the streets are deserted at the siesta time in those cities.


Biological need for naps

In recent years, studies have suggested a biological need for afternoon naps. The body is on a 24-hour body clock, which makes you wind down between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m. and again in the three hours directly after lunch. Researchers found that subjects of the studies felt that it was easiest to fall asleep at night and in the afternoon.[2]


In some individuals, postprandial dip, a brief drop in blood glucose levels caused by the body's normal insulin response to a heavy meal, may produce drowsiness after the meal that can encourage a nap. In medicine and specifically endocrinology, postprandial dip is a term used to refer to mild hypoglycemia occurring after ingestion of a heavy meal. ... In medicine, blood sugar is glucose in the blood. ...


Siesta in other cultures

Dentist and pharmacist sharing similar business hours in the island of Lipsi, Greece

The concept of a midday nap is also prominent in other tropical or subtropical countries, where the afternoon heat dramatically reduces work productivity. The Washington Post of February 13, 2007 reports at length on studies in Greece that indicate that those who nap have less risk of heart attack. [1] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2510x3139, 1008 KB)Photo by KF, July 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2510x3139, 1008 KB)Photo by KF, July 2006. ... X-rays can reveal if a person has cavities Dentistry is the practical application of knowledge of dental science (the science of placement, arrangement, function of teeth) to human beings. ... The mortar and pestle is an international symbol of pharmacists and pharmacies. ... Lipsi is an island south of Samos and to the north of Leros in Greece. ... ...


In South Asia, the idea of a post-lunch nap is common, and the idea of going to sleep after a light massage with mustard oil to induce drowsiness was very popular before industrialization. It was also very popular to consume a light snack during this ritual; it was thought that this practice would make one a better person.[citation needed] In Bangladesh and Indian Bengal, the word which describes the concept is bhat-ghum, literally meaning "rice-sleep" (nap after consuming rice). Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... The term mustard oil is used for two different oils that are made from mustard seeds: a fatty vegetable oil resulting from pressing the seeds, an essential oil resulting from grinding the seeds, mixing them with water, and extracting the resulting volatile oil by distillation. ... , West Bengal (Bengali: পশ্চিমবঙ্গ Poshchimbôŋgo) is a state in eastern India. ...


Afternoon sleep is also a common habit in China and Taiwan. This is called xiuxi or wushui in Chinese. Its main difference from the siesta is that it lasts between two and three hours. It occurs after the midday meal and is even a constitutional right (article 43, Right to rest). Almost all schools in Mainland China and Taiwan have a half-hour '"nap period'" right after lunch. This is a time when all lights are out and one is not allowed to do anything else than sleep.


Some Japanese offices have special rooms known as napping rooms for their workers to take a nap during lunch break or after overtime work.


See also

For other uses, see Sleep (disambiguation). ... “Dreams” redirects here. ... A power nap (sometimes called a catnap) is a short nap, usually 15-20 minutes, coined by Cornell University social psychologist James Maas. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Segmented sleep or divided sleep are modern Western terms for a polyphasic sleep pattern found in medieval and early modern Europe and many modern non-industrial societies, where the nights sleep is evenly divided by a few hours of wakefulness. ...

References

  1. ^ Dement, William (1999). The Promise of Sleep. Dell Publishing, 113-115. ISBN 0-440-50901-7. 
  2. ^ http://supermemo.com/articles/sleep.htm#Siesta%20and%20catnapping

Dell Publishing was an American publisher of books, magazines, and comic books. ...

External Links

  • Why We Could All Do with a Siesta - An article about research results from the University of Manchester

  Results from FactBites:
 
Siesta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (828 words)
A siesta (IPA: [siˈɛstə]) is a short nap taken in the early afternoon, often after the midday meal.
The siesta is the traditional daily sleep of the Southern region of Alentejo, in Portugal, known as sesta.
Siestas are traditionally no longer than 30 minutes and are more of a light rest than any kind of serious sleep.
siesta - definition of siesta in Encyclopedia (630 words)
A siesta is a short nap taken in the early afternoon, often after the midday meal.
The word siesta is from the Spanish language derived from the Latin (hora)sexta.
While many tropical countries have also adopted siestas, industrialized nations often resist such attempts to accept the siesta, as it often clashes with the time schedule of most workdays.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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