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Encyclopedia > Siege of Yorktown
Siege of Yorktown
Part of the American Revolutionary War

Surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown
by John Trumbull. Oil on canvas, 1820.
Date 28 September19 October 1781
Location Yorktown, Virginia
Result Decisive Franco-American victory
Belligerents
Flag of the United States United States

Kingdom of France This article is about military actions only. ... Image File history File links Surrender_of_Lord_Cornwallis. ... This article is about the American painter. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... Image File history File links US_flag_13_stars_–_Betsy_Ross. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Royalist_France. ... The borders of modern France closely align with those of the ancient territory of Gaul, inhabited by Celts known as Gauls. ...

Flag of the United Kingdom Great Britain

Flag of Hesse German Mercenaries Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hesse. ... For other uses, see Mercenary (disambiguation). ...

Commanders
Flag of the United States George Washington

Jean-Baptiste de Rochambeau
François de Grasse Image File history File links US_flag_13_stars_–_Betsy_Ross. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Royalist_France. ... Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (July 1, 1725 – May 10, 1807) was a French aristocrat, soldier, and a Marshal of France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Royalist_France. ... François Joseph Paul, marquis de Grasse Tilly, comte de Grasse François Joseph Paul, marquis de Grasse Tilly, comte de Grasse (born 1722; died January 14, 1788 in Paris) was a French admiral. ...

Flag of the United Kingdom Charles Cornwallis #

Flag of the United Kingdom Charles O’Hara # Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... Cornwallis redirects here. ... Balian of Ibelin surrendering the city of Jerusalem to Saladin, from Les Passages faits Outremer par les Français contre les Turcs et autres Sarrasins et Maures outremarins, ca. ... Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... General Charles OHara (1740 – February 25, 1802) was a British military officer who surrended the sword of Lieutenant-General Charles Cornwallis at Yorktown, 1781, ending the American Revolutionary War, and served as Governor of Gibraltar. ... Balian of Ibelin surrendering the city of Jerusalem to Saladin, from Les Passages faits Outremer par les Français contre les Turcs et autres Sarrasins et Maures outremarins, ca. ...

Strength
19,300 soldiers (10,800 French 8,500 Americans)
24 French warships
375 guns (see below)
7,500
240 guns
Casualties and losses
62 killed
190 wounded[1]
156 killed,
326 wounded,
7,018 captured[2]

The Siege of Yorktown or Battle of Yorktown in 1781 was a decisive victory by a combined assault of French forces led by General Comte de Rochambeau and American forces led by General George Washington, over a British Army commanded by General Lord Cornwallis. It proved to be the last major battle of the American Revolutionary War, as the surrender of Cornwallis’s army (the second of the war) prompted the British government to eventually negotiate an end to the conflict. The Southern theater of the American Revolutionary War became the central area of operations on land after France entered the war on the side of the United States. ... Drawing of the octagonal Williamsburg Magazine The Gunpowder Incident (also known as the Gunpowder Affair) was a conflict early in the American Revolutionary War between Lord Dunmore, the Royal Governor of colonial Virginia, and militia led by Patrick Henry. ... Combatants Patriot militia British militia Commanders William Woodford Lord Dunmore Strength 8,845 7,500 Casualties Americans: 20 killed, 56 wounded French: 52 killed, 134 wounded 156 killed 326 wounded 7,018 captured The Battle of Great Bridge was a battle of the American Revolutionary War, fought in the area... Combatants Patriot militia Loyalist militia Commanders Caswell, Lillington McLeod Strength 1,000 1,500 Casualties 1 killed, 1 wounded 30 killed or wounded, 850 captured The Battle of Moores Creek Bridge was fought near Wilmington, North Carolina, on February 27, 1776, between North Carolina patriots and Scottish Loyalists. ... The Battle of the Rice Boats was a battle of the American Revolution that took place in the Savannah River on the border between the Province of Georgia and the Province of South Carolina. ... The Battle of Alligator Bridge took place on June 30, 1778, and was the major engagement in Colonel Elijah Clarks third, and final, unsuccessful campaign to conquer East Florida. ... Combatants Loyalist militia Patriot militia Commanders James Boyd, Major William Spurgen, John Moore† Andrew Pickens, John Dooly, Elijah Clarke Strength 600 340 Casualties 20 killed, 150 captured 7 killed, 15 wounded The Battle of Kettle Creek is one of the most important battles of the American Revolutionary War to be... Combatants Patriot militia Loyalist militia Commanders John Ashe Samuel Elbert Archibald Campbell Augustine Provost Strength ~400 2,300 Casualties ~400 killed, Elbert captured 5 killed The Battle of Briar Creek was a Revolutionary War battle that took place on March 3, 1779. ... Combatants United States Britain Commanders Benjamin Lincoln John Maitland Strength 1500 900 Casualties around 300 (dead/missing) 150 The Battle of Stono Ferry was a poorly planned and badly conducted operation during the American Revolutionary War; it took place on June 20, 1779. ... Combatants United States France Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders General Benjamin Lincoln Admiral Comte dEstaing Count Kazimierz Pulaski † General Augustin Prevost Strength 1,550 American troops; 3,500 French troops and sailors 3,200 troops Casualties Total Allied: 800 killed 1200 wounded 40 killed 63 wounded The Siege of... Combatants Britain 17th Lancers{then called Dragoons} British Legion (1778) United States 3rd Virginia Detachment composed of 2nd and 7th Virginia Regiments Commanders Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton Colonel Abraham Buford Strength 270 400 Casualties 5 killed 12 wounded {11 horses killed 19 horses wounded} 113 killed 150 wounded and paroled... Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain United States Commanders Sir Henry Clinton and Mariot Arbuthnot Benjamin Lincoln Strength 14,000 troops 5,000 troops Casualties 76 killed, 182 wounded 92 killed, 148 wounded, 4,650 captured (see Trivia below) The Siege of Charleston was one of the major battles which took... Combatants Britain United States Commanders Charles Cornwallis Horatio Gates Johann de Kalb† Strength 2,239 3,052 Casualties 68 killed 245 wounded 64 missing 1,000 killed or wounded 1,000 captured 132 missing The Battle of Camden was an important battle in the Southern Theatre of the American Revolutionary... Combatants Patriot militia Loyalist militia Commanders William Campbell, John Sevier, Frederick Hambright, Joseph McDowell, Benjamin Cleveland, James Williams†, Isaac Shelby Patrick Ferguson† Strength 900 (+500 nearby) 1,100 (+200 nearby) Casualties 28 killed (including James Williams), 62 wounded 157 killed, 163 wounded, 698 captured (nine of the captured were later... Combatants United States Great Britain Commanders Daniel Morgan Banastre Tarleton Strength c. ... February 1, 1781 Mecklenburg County, NC Battle of Cowans FordTemplate:STUB Categories: | | ... Combatants United States Britain Commanders Nathanael Greene Lord Cornwallis Strength 4,400 1,900 Casualties 79 killed 185 wounded 1,046 missing Total: 1,310 93 killed 413 wounded 26 missing Total: 532 The Battle of Guilford Court House was a battle fought on March 15, 1781 inside the present... Combatants United States Britain Commanders Nathaniel Greene Lord Francis Rawdon Strength 1,551 900 Casualties 19 killed 115 wounded 38 killed 170 wounded 50 captured The Battle of Hobkirks Hill was a battle of the American Revolutionary War fought on April 25, 1781. ... Battle of Green Spring took place at Green Spring Plantation in James City County, Virginia during the American Revolutionary War. ... The Battle of Eutaw Springs was a battle of the American Revolutionary War, the last engagement of the war in the Carolinas. ... Engraving based on the painting Action Between the Serapis yo and Bonhomme Richard by Richard Paton, published 1780. ... Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (July 1, 1725 – May 10, 1807) was a French aristocrat, soldier, and a Marshal of France. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Cornwallis redirects here. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Combatants British 9th/Hill, 20th/Lynd, 21st/ Hamilton, 62nd/Ansthruter, Simon Fraser Brunswick Major Generals V. Riedesel, 1st Brigade (Brunswickers) Brig. ...

Contents

Background

When General Rochambeau met General Washington in Wethersfield, Connecticut on 22 May 1781 to determine their strategy against the British, they made plans to move against New York City, which was occupied by about 10,000 men under General Sir Henry Clinton, the commander-in-chief in North America. Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (July 1, 1725 – May 10, 1807) was a French aristocrat, soldier, and a Marshal of France. ... Wethersfield is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... General Sir Henry Clinton K.B. Commander-in-Chief of British troops in America. ...


Meanwhile, word had come through to Washington that Pensacola, a key British port in Florida, under command of John Campbell, had surrendered to Spanish and French forces on May 10, 1781 following a siege and bombardment. General La Fayette in Virginia also informed Washington that Cornwallis had taken up a defensive position at Yorktown, Virginia, next to the York River. Cornwallis had been campaigning in the southern states. He had cut a wide swath, but his army of 7,500 was forced to give up its dominion of the South and retreat to Yorktown for supplies and reinforcement after an intense two-year campaign led by General Nathanael Greene, who winnowed down their numbers through an application of the Fabian strategy. Under instructions from Clinton, Cornwallis moved the army to Yorktown in order to be extracted by the Royal Navy. Pensacola, Florida has had an impressive history, being the first European settlement in the continental United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... John Campbell of Strachur, (1727-1806) often known as General John Campbell (17th of Strachur), was a British military leader and minor nobleman who succeeded Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester as commander-in-chief of the British forces in North America in 1783. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants Spain Britain Commanders Bernardo de Gálvez John Campbell Strength 7,000 regulars and militia 3,000 regulars, sailors, militia, and natives Casualties 74 dead, 198 wounded 105 dead, 382 wounded, 2,213 captured The Battle of Pensacola marked the culmination of Spains reconquest of Florida from Britain... This article is about the U.S. state. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... The York River is a navigable estuary, approximately 40 mi (64 km) long, in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... The Southern theater of the American Revolutionary War became the central area of operations on land after France entered the war on the side of the United States. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Charles Willson Peale painted a portrait of General Greene from life in 1783, which was then copied several times by C.W. Peale and his son, Rembrandt Peale. ... The Fabian strategy is a military strategy where pitched battles are avoided in favor of wearing down an opponent through a war of attrition. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ...


On 17 July 1781, while encamped at Dobbs Ferry, New York, Washington learned of the Virginia campaign of Cornwallis and wrote, “I am of Opinion, that under these Circumstances, we ought to throw a sufficient Garrison into West Point; leave some Continental Troops and Militia to cover the Country contiguous to New York, and transport the Remainder (both French and American) to Virginia, should the Enemy still keep a Force there."[3] is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Dobbs Ferry is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ... This article is about the state. ...

See also: Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route

On August 18, George Washington received confirmation that French Admiral François de Grasse, stationed in the West Indies, was sailing with his fleet to the Chesapeake Bay. For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... François Joseph Paul, marquis de Grasse Tilly, comte de Grasse François Joseph Paul, marquis de Grasse Tilly, comte de Grasse (born 1722; died January 14, 1788 in Paris) was a French admiral. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... The Chesapeake Bay - Landsat photo The Chesapeake Bay where the Susquehanna River empties into it. ...


British intelligence was good, and there is some evidence that the British realized the Americans and the French were marching south to attack Cornwallis at Yorktown. A letter, known as the “Wethersfield Intercept,” was captured by the British on its way to the Comte de Rochambeau from the French ambassador to Congress. However, this letter was in a French military cipher, and by the time the British were able to understand its meaning, Washington and Rochambeau had already started marching to Yorktown, so its value was limited. Despite this, Sir Henry Clinton was to claim after the war that he had deciphered the letter earlier than had previously been claimed, and had been acting on the basis of its content. [4] This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Battle of Yorktown

Plan of the Battle of Yorktown
Plan of the Battle of Yorktown

Admiral de Grasse sailed his fleet of twenty-eight warships north toward Virginia. Simultaneously, on 21 August 1781, Washington began moving his army south. As they marched south, Admiral De Grasses’s fleet arrived at the Chesapeake Bay. De Grasse defeated Admiral Thomas Graves’s fleet in the Battle of the Chesapeake, also known as the “Battle of the Capes,” and won control of the bay, thereby sealing its entrance and stranding Cornwallis from supply by sea. The defeat in Chesapeake Bay was the only major naval defeat suffered by the Royal Navy of Great Britain in the two hundred years of the 18th and 19th centuries. Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Graves, 1st Baron Graves (ca. ... Combatants France Great Britain Commanders Comte de Grasse Sir Thomas Graves Strength 24 ships 19 ships Casualties none some ships damaged The Battle of the Chesapeake, also known as Battle of the Virginia Capes, was a crucial naval battle in the American Revolutionary War which took place near the mouth... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ...


In the late summer of 1781 when George Washington and Rochambeau heard of Lord Cornwallis’s encampment in Yorktown, they raced southward from New York to link up with the French fleet under de Grasse in Chesapeake Bay. Washington arrived just in time to bottle-up the British, who were anticipating reinforcements that never came from either General Clinton or the British fleet.


On September 28, 1781, Washington and Rochambeau, along with La Fayette’s troops and 3,000 of de Grasse’s men, arrived at Yorktown. With them was the 2nd Canadian Regiment lead by Brigadier General Moses Hazen. In all, there were nearly 20,000 men converging on the camp established by Cornwallis. With the arrival of these troops, the stranded British forces in Yorktown were outnumbered by a two-to-one margin and were then subjected to heavy fire as work began on a siege line. Offshore, the French fleet effectively blocked aid for Cornwallis while Washington made life unbearable for the British troops with three weeks of shelling. The Allies placed up to 375 guns, mortars and siege weaponry along their lines to bombard Yorktown. The siege guns fired an average 1.2 shells or bombs every minute, or 1,728 per day. By the time the Siege ended, some 36,288 shots were fired into Yorktown. The British on the other hand had 240 pieces of artillery, mainly light guns and mortars. The British had hardly any equipment and no horses to drag their guns into position, so they were of little use. is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Lieutenant General & National Guard Commander-in-Chief Lafayette in 1792 at ~35yrs. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Moses Hazen (1733-1802) was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts. ...

Redoubt No. 10, July 2006

Cornwallis, realizing the scope of his predicament, managed to send a message to Clinton in New York. Clinton promised that a relief expedition carrying 5,000 men would leave by the 5th of October. Meanwhile, the British and Franco-American forces were digging in and improving their respective earthworks. On October 11, the allies started a second siege line only 400 yards (400 m) away from the British forces. Three days later, the French and Americans captured two major British redoubts, the French taking redoubt 9 and the Americans taking redoubt 10, completing the second siege line and the close investment of the British garrison. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... A redoubt is a fort or fort system usually consisting of an enclosed defensive emplacement outside a larger fort. ...


While the allies were enveloping his position, Cornwallis had found out that the relief force from New York was going to be late. On October 16, a British attack hoping to silence a French battery failed. The allied batteries, from their closer second siege line, were now firing directly into the British defensive works. That night, Cornwallis attempted to pass part of his force across the river to Tarleton's position, but was thwarted by a storm. Had the weather not been so bad, Cornwallis could have passed his entire force across the river, broken through the smaller Allied siege works and marched hard north. However, Cornwallis, whose army was running low on food and ammunition and still awaiting help from Clinton, offered to surrender on October 17. On 19 October, the papers were signed by Cornwallis and Thomas Symonds (the most senior naval officer present), and the pair officially surrendered. About 7,000 British troops became prisoners of the American forces. Five days after the surrender, Clinton's relief arrived. is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  • Artillery at Yorktown [1]
  • Adams, Randolph G. “A View of Cornwallis’s Surrender at Yorktown.” American Historical Review 1931 37(1): 25-49. Issn: 0002-8762 Fulltext: online at Jstor
  • Bicheno, H. Rebels and Redcoats, The American Revolutionary War, London 2003
  • Clement, R: “The World Turned Upside Down at the Surrender of Yorktown”, Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 92, No. 363 (Jan. - Mar., 1979), pp. 66-67 (available on Jstor)
  • Hibbert, C: Rebels and Redcoats: The American Revolution Through British Eyes, London, 2001
  • Jerome Greene. Guns of Independence: The Siege of Yorktown, 1781 (2005)
  • Higginbotham, Don. The War of American Independence: Military Attitudes, Policies, and Practice, 1763-1789. (1983). ISBN 0-930350-44-8. Online in ACLS History E-book Project
  • Richard M. Ketchum. Victory at Yorktown: The Campaign That Won the Revolution (2004)
  • Brendan Morrissey and Adam Hook. Yorktown 1781: The World Turned Upside Down (1994) British perspective
  • Tuchman, Barbara W. The First Salute 1988, chapter on battle
  • Ward, Christopher. The War of the Revolution. 1952, vol 2
  • Willcox, W: “The British Road to Yorktown: A Study in Divided Command”, The American Historical Review, Vol. 52, No. 1. (Oct., 1946), pp. 1-35 in JSTOR
  • Wood, W. J. Battles of the Revolutionary War, 1775–1781. ISBN 0-306-81329-7 (2003)
  • Wright, J: “Notes on the Siege of Yorktown in 1781 with Special Reference to the Conduct of a Siege in the Eighteenth Century,” William and Mary Quarterly, 2nd Ser., Vol. 12, No. 4 (Oct., 1932), pp. 229-249,
  • Jean-Baptiste Antoine de Verger’s Account of 14 October 1781 attack on Redoubt 9 at Yorktown.
  • Could the British Have Won at Yorktown Page 18

Notes

  1. ^ French: 52 killed, 134 wounded. Americans: 20 killed, 56 wounded.
  2. ^ Tarleton’s Campaigns gives casualties as: 159 killed, 328 wounded, 70 missing and 7,247 captured. A note on a General Return by Adjutant estimated that 309 were killed during siege and 44 deserters killed as well but does not break these estimates down by units.
  3. ^ Conference at Dobbs Ferry, record of conference between Washington and Comte de Rochambeau
  4. ^ Willcox, W: “The British Road to Yorktown: A Study in Divided Command”, The American Historical Review, Vol. 59, No. 1. (Oct., 1946), pp. 1-35

See also

The following units and commanders of the British, American, and French armies fought in the Siege of Yorktown of the American Revolution. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan John B. Magruder Joseph E. Johnston Strength 121,500[1] 35,000[2] Casualties 182[3] 300[3] The Battle of Yorktown or Siege of Yorktown was fought from April 5 to May 4, 1862, as part... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... At least five ships of the United States Navy have borne the name Yorktown, to commemorate of the decisive Battle of Yorktown in the American Revolutionary War. ... USN redirects here. ...

External links

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Combatants United States Britain Hessian Army Commanders George Washington Robert Magaw William Howe Wilhelm Knyphausen Strength 2,900 8,000 Casualties 53 killed, 96 wounded, & 2,818 captured 78 killed, 374 wounded Fort Washington was a fort located at the upermost tip of Manhattan, New York overlooking the Hudson River... Meigs Raid (also known as the Battle of Sag Harbor) was guerrilla raid by American forces on the British at Sag Harbor, New York on May 23, 1777 during the American Revolutionary War in which six British were killed and 90 captured while the Americans suffered no casualties. ... Commanders Horatio Gates John Burgoyne Template:Campaignbox American Revolutionary War: Campaign of 1777 The campaign of 1777 was a series of battles in 1777 during the American Revolutionary War for control of the Hudson River. ... Combatants Great Britain United States Commanders John Burgoyne General Arthur St. ... 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Major John André John André (May 2, 1750 - October 2, 1780) was a British officer hanged as a spy during the American Revolutionary War for an incident in which he assisted Benedict Arnolds attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York to the British. ... HMS Culloden was a Royal Navy third-rate ship of the line built in Deptford in 1776. ... The Washingtons Headquarters State Historic Site is a historic site on the central Hudson River in New York State, United States of America which preserves the last and longest serving headquarters of George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. ... In 1783, the Newburgh letter was sent to George Washington who was camped at Newburgh, New York; written for the army officers by Lewis Nicola, it proposed that Washington become the King of the United States. ... The Newburgh Conspiracy was a plot hatched in 1783 near the end of the American Revolutionary War resulting from the fact that many of the officers and men of the Continental Army had not received pay for many years. ... Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when the last vestige of British authority in the United States — its troops in New York — departed from Manhattan. ... The current Fraunces Tavern restaurant on Pearl Street in lower Manhattan 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Nathan-hale-cityhall. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Siege of Yorktown - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (803 words)
The Siege of Yorktown (1781) was a victory by a combined American and French force led by General George Washington, the Marquis de Lafayette, and the French General Comte de Rochambeau over a British army commanded by General Lord Charles Cornwallis.
On August 14, 1781, Washington received confirmation that the French Admiral de Grasse, stationed in the West Indies, was sailing with his fleet to the Chesapeake Bay.
It was not clear at the time that Yorktown was the climax of the war, since the British still occupied key ports such as New York City and Charleston, South Carolina.
Siege of Yorktown - MSN Encarta (628 words)
Introduction; Siege of Yorktown (1781); Siege of Yorktown (1862)
Siege of Yorktown, name applied to two different military actions, one at the end of the American Revolution, the other during the American Civil War.
Washington achieved the victory at Yorktown by coordinating his widely scattered land and sea forces in what is considered one of the most skillful military operations in history.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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