FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Siege of Fort Detroit
Siege of Fort Detroit
Part of Pontiac's Rebellion

Date: May 9, 1763October 31, 1763
Location: Detroit
Result: British victory
Casus belli: {{{casus}}}
Territory changes: {{{territory}}}
Combatants
Pontiac's confederacy Great Britain
Commanders
Pontiac
Wasson
Henry Gladwin
Donald Campbell
Strength
Casualties
Pontiac's Rebellion
Fort DetroitFort PittBloody RunBushy RunDevil's Hole
For the action in the War of 1812, see the Siege of Detroit

The Siege of Fort Detroit was an ultimately unsuccessful attempt by North American Indians to capture Fort Detroit during Pontiac's Rebellion. The siege was led primarily by Pontiac, an Ottawa war leader. Pontiacs Rebellion was a war launched in 1763 by Native Americans who were dissatisfied with British rule in the Great Lakes region and the Ohio Country after the British victory in the French and Indian War. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Casus belli is a Latin expression from the international law theory of Jus ad bellum. ... No authentic images of Pontiac are known to exist. ... No authentic images of Pontiac are known to exist. ... Pontiacs Rebellion was a war launched in 1763 by Native Americans who were dissatisfied with British rule in the Great Lakes region and the Ohio Country after the British victory in the French and Indian War. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Battle of Bushy Run was fought during Pontiacs Rebellion between a British relief column under the command of Col. ... Combatants Britain United States Commanders Isaac Brock William Hull Strength 100 regulars 300 militia 150 natives 2,500 Casualties None 2,500 captured For the 1763 action in Pontiacs Rebellion, see the Siege of Fort Detroit The Siege of Detroit, also known as the Surrender of Detroit or the... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... Building and origins of Fort Detroit Fort Detroit began as a settlement on the Detroit River called Fort Ponchartrain. ... Pontiacs Rebellion was a war launched in 1763 by Native Americans who were dissatisfied with British rule in the Great Lakes region and the Ohio Country after the British victory in the French and Indian War. ... For the Boston area punk band see Siege (band). ... No authentic images of Pontiac are known to exist. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa or Odaawa) are a Native American and First Nations people. ...


On April 27, 1763, Pontiac spoke at a council about 10 miles below Detroit. Using the teachings of Neolin to inspire his listeners, Pontiac convinced a number of Ottawas, Ojibwas, Potawatomis, and Hurons to join him in an attempt to seize Fort Detroit and drive out the British. April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Neolin (the Delaware Prophet) was a prophet of the Lenni Lenape, who was derided by the British as The Imposter. Beginning in 1762, Neolin made arguments against alcohol, materialism, and polygamy. ... One Called From A Distance (Midwewinind) of the White Earth Band, 1894 The Ojibwa, Aanishanabe or Chippewa (also Ojibwe, Ojibway, Chippeway, Anishinaabe, or Anishinabek) are the largest group of Native Americans/First Nations north of Mexico, including Métis. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... This article is about the First Nations people, the Wyandot, also known as the Huron. ... Building and origins of Fort Detroit Fort Detroit began as a settlement on the Detroit River called Fort Ponchartrain. ...


On May 7, Pontiac entered the fort with about 300 men, armed with weapons hidden under blankets, determined to take the fort by surprise. However, the British commander had apparently been informed of Pontiac's plan, and the garrison of about 120 men was armed and ready. Pontiac withdrew and, two days later, laid siege to the fort. A number of British soldiers and civilians in the area outside the fort were captured or killed; one of the soldiers was ritually cannibalized, as was the custom in some Great Lakes Indian cultures. The violence was directed only at the British: French colonists were left alone. Eventually more than 900 Indian warriors from a half-dozen tribes joined the siege. For the Boston area punk band see Siege (band). ... Cannibalism in Brazil in 1557 as described by Hans Staden. ... Habitants by Cornelius Krieghoff (1852) Habitants is the name used to referred to the French settlers who established a colony in the Haudenosaunee First Nations territory along the shores of the St. ...


Late in July, British reinforcements arrived at Fort Detroit and, on July 31, 1763, about 250 men attempted to make a surprise attack on Pontiac’s encampment. Pontiac was ready and waiting, and defeated the British at the Battle of Bloody Run. However, the situation at the fort remained a stalemate, and Pontiac’s influence among his followers began to wane. Groups of Indians began to abandon the siege, some of them making peace with the British before departing. On October 31, 1763, finally convinced that the French in Illinois would not come to his aid, Pontiac lifted the siege and removed to the Maumee River, where he continued his efforts to rally resistance against the British. July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... See also List of Indiana rivers List of Ohio rivers External link EPA Maumee River site Categories: US geography stubs | Indiana rivers | Ohio rivers ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m