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Encyclopedia > Siege of Acre (1799)
Siege of Acre
Part of the French Revolutionary Wars
Date 20 March 1799 - 21 May 1799
Location Akko, Israel
Result British / Ottoman victory
Combatants
England
Ottoman Empire
France
Commanders
W. Sidney Smith Napoleon Bonaparte
Strength
Unknown 8000
Casualties
Unknown ~ 2,000
Egypt–Syria Campaign of 1798–1800
Shubra Khit – PyramidsNileEl ArishJaffaAcreMount Tabor1st Aboukir – 2nd Aboukir

The Siege of Acre of 1799 was a siege of the Turkish-defended, walled city of Acre (now Akko in modern Israel) by Napoleon Bonaparte, future Emperor of France. A site of significant strategic importance due to its commanding position on the route between Syria and Egypt, Bonaparte wanted to capture the key port of Acre following his victories in Egypt, but had lost his siege artillery to a Royal Navy flotilla under British Commodore W. Sidney Smith. He attempted to lay siege on March 20 using only his infantry. Napoleon believed the city would capitulate quickly to him, much like it did to his idol Alexander the Great and others. In correspondence with one of his subordinate officers he voiced his conviction that a mere two weeks would be necessary to capture the lynchpin of his conquest of the holy land before marching on to Jerusalem. Underestimating the stubborn attitude of the unpredictably well fed defending forces combined with a British blockade of French supply harbours and harsh weather conditions Napoleon's forces were left hungry, cold and damp. A Turkish relief force was fought off at the Battle of Mount Tabor but the plague that struck the French camp as a result of the desperate condition of the men had now lead to the deaths of about 2,000 soldiers. Napoleon Bonaparte retreated two months later on May 21 after his last assault on May 10. Combatants Great Britain Austria Prussia Spain Russian Empire Sardinia France The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of major conflicts, beginning in 1792 and lasting until the Treaty of Amiens in 1802, fought between the French Revolutionary government and several European states. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Old City of Akko in the 19th or early 20th century, looking south-west from atop the Land Wall Promenade, the open space now a parking lot. ... The Ottoman Dynasty (or the Imperial House of Osman) ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, ErtuÄŸrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Warning: Value not specified for common_name Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem At the height of its power (1680) Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326... This article is about Sidney Smith, the English naval officer. ... Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Combatants France Mamluks Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte Murad Bey, Ibrahim Bey Strength 25,000 men 50,000-75,000 men Casualties 300 dead 4000-6000 dead or wounded Battle of the Pyramids, Francois-Louis-Joseph Watteau, 1798-1799. ... Combatants Britain France Commanders The Baron Nelson François-Paul Brueys DAigalliers† Strength 14 ships of the line (13 x 74-gun, 1 x 50-gun), 1 sloop 13 ships of the line (1 x 120-gun, 3 x 80-gun, 9 x 74gun), 4 frigates, some smaller Casualties... The Siege of El Arish was fought during February 1799 between French and Ottoman forces. ... The Siege of Jaffa was fought on March 7, 1799 between France and the Ottoman Empire. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire The Directoire Commanders Ahmad Basha al-Jazzar. ... Combatants France Ottoman Turks Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte Mustafa IV Strength 10,000 8,000 Casualties 1,000 killed and wounded 6,000 killed, wounded, or drowned. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A siege is a military blockade and assault of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition. ... An acre is an English unit of area, which is also frequently used in the United States and some Commonwealth countries. ... The Old City of Akko in the 19th or early 20th century, looking south-west from atop the Land Wall Promenade, the open space now a parking lot. ... Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ... A siege engine is a device that is designed to break or circumvent city walls and other fortifications in siege warfare. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... A rare occurance of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... Commodore is a military rank used in some navies for officers whose position exceeds that of a Captain, but is less than that of a Flag Officer. ... This article is about Sidney Smith, the English naval officer. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ... Alexander the Great (Greek: ,[1] Megas Alexandros; July 356 BC-June 11, 323 BC), also known as Alexander III, king of Macedon (336–323 BC), was one of the most successful military commanders in history. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire The Directoire Commanders Ahmad Basha al-Jazzar. ... A pandemic (from Greek pan all + demos people) is an epidemic (an outbreak of an infectious disease) that spreads worldwide, or at least across a large region. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ...

  This article about a battle of the Napoleonic Wars is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Akko (1086 words)
Acre is the seat of the head of the Bahai religion.
In 1799 Napoleon, in pursuance of his scheme for raising a Syrian rebellion against Turkish domination, appeared before Acre, but after a siege of two months (March--May) was repulsed by the Turks, aided by Sir W.
Into this fight Guy's reserve, charged with holding back the Saracens in Acre, was also drawn, and, thus freed, 5000 men sallied out from the town to the northward; uniting with the Saracen right wing, they fell upon the Templars, who suffered severely in their retreat.
Strat's Place - Daniel Rogov - Israel - Napoleon at Acre (1462 words)
Jews first settled in Acre during the period of the Roman occupation of Palestine and because of its location on the sea and its great natural beauty the city became a popular vacation place.
Local lore has it that Pasha el Jazzar built one hundred mosques and two hundred khans, small inns, all of which had restaurants that were open to overnight guests or anyone with a few coins in their pocket with which to purchase a meal.
Napoleon set siege to the city in late October, expecting that the residents would quickly run out of food and be forced to surrender.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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