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Coordinates: 33°33′38″N, 35°23′53″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

View of the new city the Sea Castle. Part of the Sea Castle in front.
View of the new city the Sea Castle. Part of the Sea Castle in front.

Sidon, Zidon or Saïda, (Arabic صيدا Ṣaydā; Hebrew צִידוֹן, Standard Hebrew Ẓidon, Tiberian Hebrew Ṣîḏōn; Phoenician צ י ד ו ן Ṣydwn) is the third-largest city in Lebanon. It is located in the South Governorate of Lebanon, on the Mediterranean coast, about 40 km (25 mi) north of Tyre and 40 km (25 mi) south of the capital Beirut. Its name means a fishery. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 645 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: Sidon, Lebanon - view of the new part of the city from the Sea Castle. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 645 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: Sidon, Lebanon - view of the new part of the city from the Sea Castle. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Bible, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early middle ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... Phoenician was a language originally spoken in the coastal region of what is now Lebanon. ... Image File history File links Phoenician_sade. ... Phoenician Yodh. ... Phoenician Daleth. ... Phoenician Waw. ... Phoenician Nun. ... The Governorate of South Lebanon South Lebanon (officially Liban-Sud) (Arabic: al-Janub) is one of the governorates of Lebanon. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ... KM, Km, or km may stand for: Khmer language (ISO 639 alpha-2, km) Kilometre Kinemantra Meditation Knowledge management KM programming language KM Culture, Korean Movie Maker. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... For other uses, see Beirut (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

Sidon on the Mediterranean coast

Sidon was inhabited as long ago as 4000 BC and was one of the most important Phoenician cities, and may have been the oldest. From here, and other ports, a great Mediterranean commercial empire was founded. Homer praised the skill of its craftsmen in producing glass and purple dyes. It was also from here that a colonizing party went to found the city of Tyre. Tyre also grew into a great city, and in subsequent years there was competition between the two, each claiming to be the metropolis ('Mother City') of Phoenicia. Glass manufacturing, Sidon's most important enterprise in the Phoenician era, was conducted on a vast scale, and the production of purple dye was almost as important. The small shell of the Murex trunculus was broken in order to extract the pigment that was so rare it became the mark of royalty. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 260 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 333 pixel, file size: 46 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Sidon on the Mediterranean Photographed by BlingBling10 I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 260 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 333 pixel, file size: 46 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Sidon on the Mediterranean Photographed by BlingBling10 I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon & Syria [2] Phoenician civilization was an enterprising maritime trading culture that spread across the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC, between... Homer (Greek: ) is the name given to the supposed unitary author of the early Greek poems the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ...


In 1855 AD, the sarcophagus of King Eshmun’azar II was discovered. From a Phoenician inscription on its lid, it appears that he was a "king of the Sidonians," probably in the 5th century BC, and that his mother was a priestess of ‘Ashtart, "the goddess of the Sidonians." In this inscription the gods Eshmun and Ba‘al Sidon 'Lord of Sidon' (who may or may not be the same) are mentioned as chief gods of the Sidonians. ‘Ashtart is entitled ‘Ashtart-Shem-Ba‘al '‘Ashtart the name of the Lord', a title also found in an Ugaritic text. Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Eshmunazar(אשמנעזר) was the name of several Phoenician kings of Sidon. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 5th century BC started on January 1, 500 BC and ended on December 31, 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... ‘Ashtart, commonly known as Astarte (also Hebrew or Phoenician עשתרת, Ugaritic ‘ttrt (also ‘Attart or ‘Athtart), Akkadian dAs_tar_tú (also Astartu), Greek Αστάρτη (Astártê)), was a major northwest_Semitic goddess, cognate in name, origin, and functions with... Eshmun (or Eshmoun, less accurately Esmun or Esmoun) was a northwestern Semitic god of healing and the tutelary god of Sidon. ... For other uses, see Baal (disambiguation). ... The Ugaritic language is known to us only in the form of writings found in the lost city of Ugarit since its discovery by French archaeologists in 1928. ...

Sidon Sea Castle
Sidon Sea Castle

In the years before Jesus, Sidon had many conquerors: Assyrians; Babylonians; Egyptians; Greeks and finally Romans. Herod the Great visited Sidon; both Jesus and Saint Paul are said to have visited it (see Biblical Sidon below). The city was eventually conquered by the Arabs and then by the Ottoman Turks. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 641 KB) Summary en: Sidon, Lebanon - Sea Castle sl: Sidon, Libanon - morski grad I took the photo myself Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sidon... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 641 KB) Summary en: Sidon, Lebanon - Sea Castle sl: Sidon, Libanon - morski grad I took the photo myself Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sidon... Sidon Sea Castle Sidon Sea Castle is a castle in Sidon, Lebanon. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... In the Middle Bronze Age Assyria was a region on the Upper Tigris river, named for its original capital, the ancient city of Assur (Akkadian: ; Hebrew: , Aramaic: ). Later, as a nation and empire that came to control all of the Fertile Crescent, Egypt and much of Anatolia, the term Assyria... Babylon (in Arabic: بابل; in Syriac: ܒܒܙܠ in Hebrew:בבל) was an ancient city in Mesopotamia (modern Al Hillah, Iraq), the ruins of which can be found in present-day Babil Province, about 80km south of Baghdad. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Herod (‎, Greek: ), also known as Herod I or Herod the Great, was a Roman client king of Judaea (73 BC – 4 BC in Jericho)[1]. Herod is known for his colossal building projects in Jerusalem and other parts of the ancient world, including the construction of the Second Temple in... Paul of Tarsus (b. ...


Like other Phoenician city states, Sidon suffered from a succession of conquerors. At the end of the Persian era in 351 BC, it was invaded by the emperor Artaxerxes III and then by Alexander the Great in 333 BC when the Hellenistic era of Sidon began. Under the successors of Alexander, it enjoyed relative freedom and organized games and competitions in which the greatest athletes of the region participated. The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Artaxerxes III ruled Persia from 358 BC to 338 BC. He was the son of Artaxerxes II and was succeeded by Arses of Persia (also known as Artaxerxes IV). ... Alexander the Great (Greek: ,[1][2] Megas Alexandros; July 20 356 BC – June 10 323 BC), also known as Alexander III, was an Ancient Greek king of Macedon (336–323 BC). ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance...


When Sidon fell under Roman domination, it continued to mint its own silver coins. The Romans also built a theater and other major monuments in the city. In the reign of Elagabalus a Roman colonia was established there, and it was given the name of Colonia Aurelia Pia Sidon. During the Byzantine period, when the great earthquake of 551 AD destroyed most of the cities of Phoenicia, Beirut's School of Law took refuge in Sidon. The town continued quietly for the next century, until it was conquered by the Arabs in 636 AD. The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... For other uses, see Beirut (disambiguation). ... An Arab (Arabic: ) is a member of a complexly defined ethnic group who identifies as such on the basis of one or more of either genealogical, political, or linguistic grounds. ...


On December 4, 1110 Sidon was sacked in the First Crusade. It then became the centre of the Lordship of Sidon, an important seigneury in the Kingdom of Jerusalem. During the Crusades it was sacked several times: it was finally destroyed by the Saracens in 1249. In 1260 it was again destroyed by the Mongols. The remains of the original walls are still visible. is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events December 4 - First Crusade: The Crusaders conquer Sidon. ... Combatants Christendom, Catholicism West European Christians, Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia Seljuks, Arabs and other Muslims The First Crusade was launched in 1095 by Pope Urban II with the dual goals of liberating the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land from Muslims and freeing the Eastern Christians from Muslim... The Lordship of Sidon was one of the four major seigneuries of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, according to the 13th-century writer John of Ibelin. ... Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... The name Mongols (Mongolian: Mongol) specifies one or several ethnic groups. ...


After Sidon came under Ottoman Turkish rule in the seventeenth century, it regained a great deal of its earlier commercial importance. After World War I it became part of the French Mandate of Lebanon. During World War II the city, together with the rest of Lebanon, was captured by British forces fighting against the Vichy French, and following the war it became a major city of independent Lebanon. Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy [[Category:Former monarchies}}|Ottoman Empire, 1299]] Sultans  - 1281–1326... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Mandates in the Middle east and Africa. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Vichy (Occitan: Vichèi) is a French commune, situated in the département of Allier and the région of Auvergne. ...


Following the Nakba in 1948, a considerable number of Palestinian refugees arrived in Sidon, as in other Lebanese cities, and were settled at the large refugee camps of Ein el-Hilweh and Mia Mia. At first these consisted of enormous rows of tents, but gradually houses were constructed. The refugee camps constituted de-fact neighborhoods of Sidon, but had a separate legal and political status which made them into a kind of enclaves. During the Israeli invasion in 1982, the city was subjected to aerial bombing, causing heavy casualties among the civilian population. Palestinian refugees in 1948 The Palestinian exodus (Arabic: الهجرة الفلسطينية al-Hijra al-Filasteeniya) refers to the refugee flight of Palestinian Arabs during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Ain al-Hilweh (variously, Ayn al-Hilweh, Ein al-Hilweh, etc. ... Mia Mia is a picturesque area of Central Victoria, Australia, north of Melbourne and south of Bendigo. ...


Sidon today

In 1900 it was a town of 10,000 inhabitants; in 2000 its population was around 200,000. Although there is little level land around the city, some wheat and vegetables are grown and there is much fruit also; some fishing is carried on. The heavily-silted ancient port is now used only by small coastal vessels. There is also a refinery there. Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A state-of-the-art stadium was inaugurated in 2000 for the Asian Football Confederation's Cup 2000. Saida International Stadium is a 22,600 capacity multi-use stadium in Saida, Lebanon. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Asian Football Confederations Asian Cup 2000 finals were held in the Lebanon between October 12 and October 29. ...


Tourism

Soap on display inside Sidon Soap Museum
Soap on display inside Sidon Soap Museum
Inside Khan El Franj
The Castle of St. Louis
  • Sidon Sea Castle
Main article: Sidon Sea Castle

Sidon Sea Castle is a fortress built by the Crusaders in the early 13th century. It is located near the Port of Sidon. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sidon Sea Castle Sidon Sea Castle is a castle in Sidon, Lebanon. ... The Crusaders (formerly the Canterbury Crusaders) are a New Zealand Rugby Union team based in Christchurch, New Zealand that competes in the Super 14 (formerly the Super 12). ...

  • Sidon Soap Museum
Main article: Sidon Soap Museum

The Sidon Soap Museum traces the history of the soap making in the region and its different manufacturing steps. Soap on display inside Sidon Soap Museum The Sidon Soap Museum is a museum in Sidon, Lebanon. ...

  • Khan El Franj

Khan El Franj, which means “Caravan of the Foreigners”, was built by Emir Fakhreddine in the 17th century to accommodate merchants and goods. This is a typical khan with a large rectangular courtyard and a central fountain surrounded by covered galleries. Fakhr-al-Din II also the Great was a Lebanese prince, son of prince Qurqumaz from the Maan Druze dinasty and princess Nassab. ...

  • Debbane Palace

Debbane Palace is a historical residence built in 1721 AD and is open for the public for visitors to witness the Arab-Ottoman architecture and details of that era (18th Century). It is currently in the process of being transformed into the History Museum of Sidon.[1]

  • Old Souks

Between the Sea Castle and the Castle of St. Louis stretches the old town and a picturesque vaulted old market

  • The Castle of St. Louis or Qalaat Al Muizz

The Castle of St. Louis was built by the Crusaders in the 13th century on top of the remains of a fortress built by the Fatimid caliph Al Muizz. It is located to the south of old souks near Murex hill. The Crusaders (formerly the Canterbury Crusaders) are a New Zealand Rugby Union team based in Christchurch, New Zealand that competes in the Super 14 (formerly the Super 12). ... The Fatimids, Fatimid Caliphate or al-Fātimiyyūn (Arabic الفاطميون) is the Shia dynasty that ruled over varying areas of the Maghreb, Egypt, and the Levant from 5 January 910 to 1171. ... Maad al-Muizz Li-Deenillah (* 932, † 975) was the fourth Fatimid Caliph and reigned from 953 to 975 in Ifriqiya and, after its conquest by him, Egypt. ...

  • Eshmun Temple

The temple of Eshmun, the Phoenician God of healing, was built in the 7th century BC and is located in the north of Sidon near the Awali river. Eshmun (or Eshmoun, less accurately Esmun or Esmoun) was a northwestern Semitic god of healing and the tutelary god of Sidon. ... Phoenician can mean: The Phoenician ancient civilization The Phoenician alphabet The Phoenician languages This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The Biblical Sidon

The Bible describes Sidon at various places: This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...

  • It received its name from the "first-born" of Canaan, the grandson of Noah (Genesis 10:15, 19).
  • It was the first home of the Phoenicians on the coast of Canaan, and from its extensive commercial relations became a "great" city. (Joshua 11:8; 19:28).
  • It was the mother city of Tyre. It lay within the lot of the tribe of Asher, but was never subdued (Judges 1:31).
  • The Sidonians long oppressed Israel (Judges 10:12).
  • From the time of David its glory began to wane, and Tyre, its "virgin daughter" (Isaiah 23:12), rose to its place of pre-eminence.
  • Solomon entered into a matrimonial alliance with the Sidonians, and thus their form of idolatrous worship found a place in the land of Israel (1 Kings 11:1, 33).
  • Jezebel was a Sidonian princess (1 Kings 16:31).
  • It was famous for its manufactures and arts, as well as for its commerce (1 Kings 5:6; 1 Chronicles 22:4; Ezekiel 27:8).
  • It is frequently referred to by the prophets (Isaiah 23:2, 4, 12; Jeremiah 25:22; 27:3; 47:4; Ezekiel 27:8; 28:21, 22; 32:30; Joel 3:4).
  • Elijah sojourned in Sidon, performing miracles (1 Kings 17:9-24; Luke 4:26).
  • Jesus visited the "coasts" of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24) and from this region many came forth to hear him preaching (Mark 3:8; Luke 6:17).
  • From Sidon, at which the ship put in after leaving Caesarea, Paul finally sailed for Rome (Acts 27:3, 4).

For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... Noahs Ark, Französischer Meister (The French Master), Magyar Szépművészeti Múzeum, Budapest. ... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon & Syria [2] Phoenician civilization was an enterprising maritime trading culture that spread across the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC, between... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... David and Goliath, by Caravaggio, c. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... Artists depiction of Solomos court (Ingobertus, c. ... Kingdom of Israel: Early ancient historical Israel — land in pink is the approximate area under direct central royal administration during the United Monarchy. ... Jezebel has several meanings: Jezebel (Bible) is a person in the Bible Jezebel (film) is a 1938 film Jezebel (Japanese band) is a Japanese visual kei band Common Jezebel (Butterfly) Anita ODay was billed as the Jezebel of Jazz Jezebel, a song by Iron & Wine from the Woman King... Elijah, 1638, by Ribera, José de This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... Caesarea is the name of several Roman cities and towns, including: Caesarea Antiochia, properly Antioch in Pisidia, near modern Yalvaç, Turkey Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, modern Kayseri, Turkey Caesarea Palaestina: modern Caesarea, in Israel Caesarea Philippi in the Golan Heights Iol Caesarea: modern Cherchell, in Algeria Caesarea Magna or Caesara... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Sanchuniathon or Sanchoniathon or Sanchoniatho is the purported Phoenician author of three works in Phoenician, surviving only in partial paraphrase and summary of a Greek translation by Philo of Byblos. ... Nereus: in Greek Mythology, eldest son of Pontus and Gaia, the Sea and the Earth. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.museumsaida.org/english/projet.htm
  • This entry incorporates text from the public domain Easton's Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897.
  • additional notes taken from Collier's Encyclopedia (1967 edition)

Eastons Bible Dictionary generally refers to the Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition, by Matthew George Easton M.A., D.D. (1823-1894), published three years after Eastons death in 1897 by Thomas Nelson. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Sidon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (610 words)
Sidon, Zidon or Saida, (Arabic صيدا Ṣaydā; Hebrew צִידוֹן, Standard Hebrew Ẓidon, Tiberian Hebrew Ṣîḏōn) is the third-largest city in Lebanon.
It became the centre of the Lordship of Sidon, an important seigneury in the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
After Sidon came under Ottoman Turkish rule in the seventeenth century, it regained a great deal of its earlier commercial importance.
Sidon - Wikipedia (352 words)
Dieser Artikel behandelt die libanesische Stadt Sidon, für den Ortsteil Saida der sächsischen Gemeinde Kreischa, siehe Saida (Kreischa).
Nach einer phönizischen Inschrift zählt er offenbar zu den "Königen von Sidon" evtl.
Sidon war berühmt für seine Handwerker, Künstler und Handelsleute (1.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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