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Encyclopedia > Siding
Corrugated steel siding, for the side of a barn.
Corrugated steel siding, for the side of a barn.

Siding is the outer covering of a house meant to shed water and protect from the effects of weather. Image File history File links LightningVolt_Corrugated_Steel_Siding. ... Image File history File links LightningVolt_Corrugated_Steel_Siding. ... The steel cable of a colliery winding tower. ... A barn in southern Ontario, Canada A barn in Wisconsin A barn in Poland Barn redirects here, for other uses, see Barn (disambiguation). ... A house in Pathanapuram, Kerala (India) A house, a structure used for habitation by people, generally has walls and a roof to shelter its enclosed space from precipitation, wind, heat, and cold. ...


Siding may be formed of horizontal boards, vertical boards, shingles, or sheet materials. In all four cases, avoiding wind and rain infiltration through the joints is a major challenge, met by overlapping, by covering or sealing the joint, or by creating an interlocking joint such as a tongue-and-groove or rabbet. Since building materials expand and contract with changing temperature and humidity, it is not practical to make rigid joints between the siding elements. Look up shingle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A rebate or rabbet A rabbet (also known as rebate) is a recess or groove cut into the edge of a piece of machineable material, usually wood. ...


Siding may be made of wood, metal, plastic, or composite materials. It may be attached directly to the building structure (studs in the case of wood construction), or to an intermediate layer of horizontal planks called sheathing. The word sheath has a number of related meanings in English. ...

Contents

Wood siding

Siding is often made out of wood in overlapping horizontal rows or "courses", called clapboard. In colonial times, Eastern white pine was the most common material. Wood siding can also be made of unpainted weather-resistant woods such as redwood. Jointed horizontal siding may be shiplapped. Trunks A tree trunk as found at the Veluwe, The Netherlands Wood is a solid material derived from woody plants, notably trees but also shrubs. ... Clapboard, also known as bevel siding or lap siding (with regional variants as to the exact definitions of these terms), is a board used typically for exterior horizontal siding that has one edge thicker than the other and where the board above laps over the one below. ... Binomial name Pinus strobus L. Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus) is a large pine native to eastern North America, occurring from Newfoundland west to Minnesota and southeasternmost Manitoba, and south along the Appalachian Mountains to the extreme north of Georgia. ... Binomial name Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. ... Shiplap is a term used to describe a type of wooden board used commonly in the contruction of barns, sheds, outbuildings and inexpensive or seasonal homes. ...


Vertical horizontal siding may have a cover over the joint: board and batten, popular in American wooden Gothic revival houses; or less commonly behind the joint--batten and board. Look up batten in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


Plywood sheet siding is sometimes used on inexpensive buildings, sometimes with grooves to imitate board-and-batten (T1-11). Toy constructed from plywood. ...


Wood shingles or irregular cedar "shake" siding was used in early New England construction, and was revived in Shingle Style and Queen Anne style architecture in the late 19th century. Because trees were plentiful from the earliest days of settlement of North America, the use of wood for all aspects of construction is not surprising. ... A Shake Roof in Romania A shake is a wooden shingle that is made from split logs. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The Queen Anne style of British and American architecture reached its greatest popularity in the last quarter of the 19th century, manifesting itself in a number of different ways, not identically in Great Britain and the United States of America. ... The Buttermans, the historic home of John Newman, the butter king, is one of several Queen Anne mansions in Elgin, Illinois The Queen Anne style of British and American architecture reached its greatest popularity in the last quarter of the 19th century, manifesting itself in a number of different ways...


Modern wood siding requires more maintenance than other popular solutions, requiring treatment every 4-6 years depending on the severity of the elements to which it is exposed. All measures that are taken to ensure a long life of wood fall under the definition wood preservation (timber treatment). ...


Plastic siding

Wood clapboard is often imitated using vinyl. It is usually produced in units twice as high as clapboard. Plastic imitations of wood shingle and wood shakes also exist. Vinyl or plastic siding has grown in popularity due to the generally low maintenance and low cost appeal it offers. Vinyl siding is a way of covering the sides of the houses in which vinyl plates are used. ...


Metal siding

Utilitarian buildings often use corrugated galvanized steel sheet siding. Hot-dip galvanizing is the process of coating iron or steel with a thin zinc layer by passing the steel through a molten bath of zinc at a temperature of around 460°C. Zinc rusts to form zinc oxide, a fairly strong material that stops further rusting, protecting the steel...


Formerly, imitation wood clapboard was made of aluminum: 'aluminum siding'. Aluminum is a soft and lightweight metal with a dull silvery appearance, due to a thin layer of oxidation that forms quickly when it is exposed to air. ...


Composite siding

Various composite materials are also used for siding: asphalt, asbestos, fiber cement, aluminum (ACM) etc. They may be in the form of shingles or boards, in which case they are sometimes called clapboard. A Asphalt Shingle is a type of roof shingle. ... Fibrous asbestos on muscovite Asbestos Asbestos Asbestos (a misapplication of Latin: asbestos quicklime from Greek : a, not and sbestos, extinguishable) describes any of a group of minerals that can be fibrous, many of which are metamorphic and are hydrous magnesium silicates. ... Fiber cement siding is a building material used to cover the exterior of a house. ... Aluminum is a soft and lightweight metal with a dull silvery appearance, due to a thin layer of oxidation that forms quickly when it is exposed to air. ... Clapboard, also known as bevel siding or lap siding (with regional variants as to the exact definitions of these terms), is a board used typically for exterior horizontal siding that has one edge thicker than the other and where the board above laps over the one below. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Side - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (966 words)
Side (pronounced See-deh) was an ancient maritime city of Pamphylia, about 16 km from Seleucia; it currently lies on the southern coast near the villages of Manavgat and Selimiye (about 75 km from Antalya), in Antalya Province, in the Asian part of Turkey.
Side is located on the eastern part of the Pamphylian coast, which lies about 20 km east of the mouth of the Eurymedon River.
During the fifth and sixth centuries, Side was the seat of the Bishopric of Eastern Pamphylia.
A-side and B-side - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1587 words)
In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles were released beginning in the 1950s.
The terms have come to refer to the types of song conventionally placed on each side of the record, with the A-side being the featured song (the one that the record producer hopes will receive radio airplay and become a "hit"), while the B-side, or "flipside," is secondary.
Since both sides of a single received equal royalties, some composers deliberately arranged for their songs to be used as the B-sides of singles by popular artists, thereby making a fortune literally off the back of the A-side.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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