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Encyclopedia > Siddha Yoga

Siddha Yoga is a new religious movement[1] that is based in part on Hindu spiritual traditions. According to the organization itself: A new religious movement or NRM is a term used to refer to a religious faith, or an ethical, spiritual or philosophical movement of recent origin that isnt part of an established denomination, church, or religious body. ... A Hindu ( , Devanagari: हिन्दु), as per modern definition, is an adherent of the philosophies and scriptures of Hinduism, and the religious, philosophical and cultural system that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ...

The Siddha Yoga tradition draws many of its teachings from the Indian yogic texts of Vedanta and Kashmir Shaivism, the Bhagavad Gita and the poet-saints.[2] This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Kashmir Shaivism is a school of spiritual teaching and practice that arose during the eighth century in Kashmir, India. ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ...

The movement's teachings are summarized in 4 aphorisms:[3]

  1. Honor your Self, Worship your Self, Meditate on your Self, God dwells within you as you.
  2. See God in each other.
  3. The heart is the hub of all sacred places; go there and roam.
  4. Nothing exists that is not Shiva.

Siddha Yoga has ashrams and centers (meeting places) in a number of countries, including India, the United States, Australia, Great Britain and Japan.[4] For other uses, see Siva (disambiguation). ... An Ashram (Pronounced aashram) in ancient India was a Hindu hermitage where sages (See Rishi) lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ...

Contents

The name "Siddha Yoga"

Since 1977, Siddha Yoga® is a registered service mark[5] of the SYDA Foundation (a domestic non-profit corporation registered in New York State).[6] The SYDA Foundation was founded in the early 1970's by Swami Muktananda (19081982) to administer the global work of Siddha Yoga.[7] As a service mark, Siddha Yoga® is an educational service used in teaching and conducting workshops in furtherance of individual spiritual development.[5] Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Trademark. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... Swami playing the Harmonium Swami is a primarily Hindu honorific, loosely akin to master. It is derived from the Sanskrit language and means owner of oneself, denoting complete mastery over instinctive and lower urges. ... Swami Muktananda (स्‍वामी मुक्तानन्‍द) (1908-1982) is the monastic name of an Indian guru. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


An editorial in Hinduism Today objected to the registration of the phrase by the SYDA Foundation, claiming that Siddha Yoga was previously used as a Sanskrit term.[8] A prior use of the term "siddha yoga" is documented in 1948 by Swami Vishnu Tirtha who used the term in the following passages: The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Swami Vishnu Tirth Maharaj, also known as Munilal Swami, was born (date unknown) in the Jhajjar, Haryana, India. ...

Therefore the yoga of Kundalini, is known as Mahayoga. It is also sometimes called Siddhayoga because it can be acquired only through the favor of a perfect master (Siddha Guru) without any effort on the part of the initiated.[9] Statue of Shiva performing Yogic meditation Yoga (Devanagari: योग) is a group of ancient spiritual practices originating in India. ... Mahayoga (Skt. ...

It has been said that through Shaktipat, Kundalini is soon awakened and Mahayoga or Siddhayoga is the direct outcome.[10]

A reference to Siddha Yoga can be found in an English translation of the Third Tantra of the Tirumantiram of Tirumular.[11] Tirumūlār was a Tamil poet, classified as 7th or 8th century AD by Maurice Winternitz.[12] Thirumandhiram, is a Tamil religious poetic work written in the sixth century Bce by Thirumoolar. ... Thirumoolar also spelt Tirumular or Thirumular is one of the 18 Siddhars. ...


History

Bhagawan Nityananda was viewed by many devotees as a Siddha Guru or Avadhut. He first visited Ganeshpuri, a village located 82 kilometers north of Mumbai in 1936. In Ganeshpuri, Nityananda lived in a small hut built for him by the caretakers of the local Shiva temple. As visitors and devotees of Nityananda increased in number, the hut expanded into an ashram. A frequent visitor to Nityananda's ashram was a wandering yogi named Swami Muktananda. In his autobiography, The Play of Consciousness published by the SYDA Foundation, Muktananda claims that on August 15, 1947, Nityananda gave him Shaktipat transmission. According to the same source, Swami Muktananda attained God-realization or mukti after nine more years of sadhana and discipleship.[13] Bhagavan Nityananda (November/December, 1897?[1] – August 8, 1961) was an Indian guru who is claimed by the Siddha Yoga organization as the first in their lineage of Siddha gurus. ... A Siddha in Sanskrit means One who is accomplished and refers to perfected masters who have transcended the Ahamkara (Ego or I-maker), have subdued their minds to be subservient to their Awareness, and have transformed their bodies composed of dense Rajo-tama Gunas into pure Satvic light. ... Guru - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Avadhut is a term from the spiritual traditions of India. ... , “Bombay” redirects here. ... An Ashram (Pronounced aashram) in ancient India was a Hindu hermitage where sages (See Rishi) lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... It has been suggested that yogin be merged into this article or section. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Shaktipat is a term from Sanskrit and Hindi that refers to the act of a guru or spiritual teacher conferring a form of spiritual power or awakening on a disciple/student. ... Moksha - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A Sadhana is a ritualistic meditation practice from Hindu and Buddhist spiritual traditions which is followed in order to achieve a form of spiritual purification or enlightenment. ...


Nityananda died in 1961. Muktananda continued the shaktipat tradition by passing on initiation to many people in India and other countries. It was through his widespread extension of the little known Shaktipat experience that Muktananda became a well-known figure. Among his teachings, Muktananda expressed his view of what the Guru really is: one who awakens the inner shakti Kundalini through shaktipat.[14] Muktananda's fame as a Guru increased to the point of being made the subject of a Time magazine article in 1976.[15] Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ...


Under Swami Muktananda's leadership, the ashram at Ganeshpuri grew substantially and became known as Gurudev Siddha Peeth.[16] As Siddha Yoga expanded beyond India, Swami Muktananda established a large ashram in the Catskills area north of New York City. He named this ashram after his guru, Nityananda. One of Muktananda's devotees was a young Hindu woman named Malti Shetty, who came from Mumbai. She accompanied Muktananda on his world tours and was given the role of his English-language interpreter. In May, 1982, Swami Muktananda installed Malti Shetty — now known as Gurumayi Chidvilasananda — and her brother Subhash Shetty — now known as Mahamandaleshwar Swami Nityanand, as co-Gurus and spiritual leaders of Siddha Yoga. Swami Muktananda died on October 2, 1982 (in India, the passing on of a Saint or Siddha is often referred to as mahasamadhi). Gurudev Siddha Peeth is an Indian ashram belonging to the Siddha Yoga organization. ... Swami Chidvilasananda (born June 24, 1955) is an Indian who, as of 2007, is the guru of the Hindu KaÅ›mir Åšaivite lineage (parampara), Siddha Yoga. ... Mahamandaleshwar Swami Nityanand (born Subhash Shetty in Mumbai, India, 1962) is a Hindu guru known as Swami Nityanand. ... October 2 is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section should include material from Samadhi meditation Samadhi, or concentration of the mind, is the second of the three parts of the Buddhas teaching, namely Sila (morality), Samadhi (concentration), and Panna (insight/wisdom). ...


In 1983 William Rodarmor made public the accusations of some former members that the Siddha Yoga leadership engaged in abusive behavior at odds with its teachings and wider accepted norms. He did so in an article in CoEvolution Quarterly of winter 1983.[17] Swami Nityananda stepped down in 1985 amid controversy about breaking his vows.[18] He has since started his own group, Shanti Mandir. Chidvilasananda continued in her appointed role and has been the sole leader and guru of Siddha Yoga since then. In 1992 she founded the PRASAD Project.[19] Lis Harris repeated and extended Rodarmor's allegations in The New Yorker of November 14, 1994.[20] The 'Leaving Siddha Yoga' website was started in July 1996 to provide information about alleged problems in Siddha Yoga.[21] In 1997 Chidvilasananda founded the Muktabodha Institute with its own publishing imprint, Agama Press.[22] Sarah Caldwell stated in 2001, in the academic journal Nova Religio, that Muktananda was both an enlightened teacher and a secret practitioner of an esoteric form of Tantric sexual yoga.[23] CoEvolution Quarterly (later re-named Whole Earth Review) was one of the publishing ventures of the same visionary biologist (with interests in cultures and in art) who launched the Whole Earth Catalog and an early Internet community, still functioning, called the WELL. Stewart Brand is the name of this editor... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Shanti Mandir is a worldwide community of people leaning and teaching traditional Hindu or yogic practices both in India and in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lis Harris is a American journalist and author and was for 25 years a staff writer on The New Yorker magazine which she left in 1995. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... In the publishing industry, an imprint is a brand name under which a work is published. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Tantras be merged into this article or section. ...


Practices

The main practices of Siddha Yoga include meditation, chanting, seva, dakshina, satsang and darshan.[24] The form of meditation practiced is silent with attention focused on a mantra and/or on the flow of breath. The mantra most often used for meditation is the mantra Om Namah Shivaya. Students chant Sanskrit mantras which can either be Nama Sankirtana (chants that consist of short Sanskrit phrases, typically names of God) or swadhyaya (chanting of longer texts). The texts include the Guru Gita, morning and evening Arati, Shree Rudram, and the Kundalini Stavaha. Students practice seva through volunteer work at either an ashram or a center in their city. Seva can also mean any service done as an offering to God. Dakshina is a financial offering or gift to the Guru. Traditionally, when students seek the teachings or blessings of a saint, they make an offering of dakshina. The practice of giving dakshina is an expression of appreciation for what has been received on the spiritual path. Satsang refers to group meetings or programs, usually held weekly, at the ashrams and Siddha Yoga meditation centers. Satsang includes talks, meditation and chanting.[25] Darshan means to experience the presence of the Guru, either in person or symbolically through prostration at the Guru's chair or picture and the touching of the Guru's sandals. A large statue in Bangalore depicting Shiva meditating Meditation describes a state of concentrated attention on some object of thought or awareness. ... Chant is the rhythmic speaking or singing of words or sounds, often primarily on one or two pitches called reciting tones. ... Seva (Sanskrit: stringe) is: in Sikhism, volunteer work; selfless service; work offered to God, performed without attachment and with the attitude that one is not the doer. ... A Dakshina, also known as Gurudakshina is a Sanskrit word describing the Indian tradition of a student repaying his teacher, his guru after the completion of his education. ... The company of the highest knowledge and Truth; the company of a Guru; contact with a person or an assembly of persons who listen to, talk about, and assimilate the Truth. ... Darshan is a Sanskrit and Hindu (also used to some extent in Urdu) term meaning sight (in the sense of an instance of seeing something or somebody), vision, apparition, or a glimpse. ... In Tibet, many Buddhists carve mantras into rocks as a form of devotion. ... Aum namah Sivāya is among the foremost Vedic mantras. ... The Guru Gita is a Hindu scripture of 182 verses, authored by the sage, Vyasa. ... The Shri Rudram Chamakam (TS 4. ...


Holy days

Siddha Yoga celebrates two common Indian religious holidays Maha Shivaratri (celebrated in February) and Guru Purnima (celebrated on the first full moon in July). They also celebrate the birthdays of Muktananda and Chidvilasananda and Muktananda's divya diksha day (the day he received initiation). They also observe the anniversaries of Muktananda's and Bhagawan Nityanandas deaths.[26] Maha Shivratri or Maha Sivaratri or Shivaratri or Sivaratri (Night of Shiva) is a Hindu festival celebrated every year on the 14th day in the Krishna Paksha of the month Maagha (as per Shalivahana) or Phalguna(as per Vikrama) in the Hindu Calendar. ... The day of full moon, Purnima, in the month of Ashadh of the Hindu calendar is traditionally celebrated as Guru Purnima by Hindus. ...


Scriptures

The Siddha Yoga literature states that it draws many of its teachings from the texts of Vedanta, Kashmir Shaivism and the poets of India. From Vedanta it mentions the Upanishads, the Vedas, the Viveka Chudamani and the Yoga Vasishtha. From Kashmir Shaivism it mentions the Shiva sutras, the Prataybhijnahridayam, the Spanda Karikas and Vijnana Bhairava. In addition the literature states that many of the teachings of Siddha Yoga are contained in the Bhagavad Gita, the Jnaneshwari, the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, the Bhakti Sutras, the Mahabharata, the Ramayana and the Guru Gita[2] The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद) are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ... The two Epics and the Prasthana thraya—the triple foundation of the Vedanta school of philosophical and spiritual system, namely the Upanishads, Brahma Sutras (Vedanta Sutras) and the Bhagavad-Gita—are the perennial sources of ethical and spiritual knowledge and wisdom, inspiring thousands of earnest seekers of truth. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... This is an article about the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... The Guru Gita is a Hindu scripture of 182 verses, authored by the sage, Vyasa. ...


References in popular culture

Movies

  • Startup.com References in two scenes: One is a copy of a painting of the Goddess Lakshmi from the Shree Muktananda Ashram, the other is a scene where Kaleil is chanting the Guru Gita while driving.
  • The Guru Reference is in a scene where the character Lexi is asking Swami Bu about the nature of his teachings. "Muktananda says, 'See God in each other.'"
  • Kissing Jessica Stein Reference is in a scene where Helen is meditating while Jessica is calling her and leaving a message. One can see a small picture of Swami Muktananda on the altar.

Startup. ... Shree Muktananda Ashram, in the Catskills area, upstate New York, is an international retreat center owned and operated by the SYDA Foundation. ... Movie poster of The Guru The Guru is a 2002 comedy movie directed by Daisy von Scherler Mayer, and written by Tracey Jackson, about a dance teacher who comes to America from India and serendipitously becomes a sex guru disseminating a philosophy he learns from a porno movie actress. ... Kissing Jessica Stein (2001) is a U.S. independent romantic comedy starring and written by Jennifer Westfeldt and Heather Juergensen, and directed by Charles Herman-Wurmfeld. ...

See also

Oakland Ashram is a Siddha Yoga spiritual retreat centre in Oakland, California. ... Satguru or Sadguru means true guru (Sanskrit सदगुरू sat=true), literally: true teacher. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The New Religious Movements Homepage @The University of Virginia. Retrieved on 2007-03-18. Religious Movements in the United States by Timothy Miller of the University of Kansas. The Watershed of 1965 - "In the early 1970s Swami Muktananda began visiting the U.S. to teach the followers who had sought him out in India, and soon his Siddha Yoga was a thriving American movement."
  2. ^ a b The Scriptural Tradition. Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  3. ^ SY essential teachings. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  4. ^ Centers and Ashrams. Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  5. ^ a b United States Patent and Trademark Office - Trademark Electronic Search System. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  6. ^ New York State's Division of Corporations Entry for SYDA Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  7. ^ Swami Muktananda -Siddha Yoga. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  8. ^ Palani, Sivasiva (November 1990). "The Trademark Wars". Hinduism Today. 
  9. ^ Tirtha (1948), p. 79.
  10. ^ Tirtha (1948), p. 80.
  11. ^ Natarajan (1979), p. 92.
  12. ^ Winternitz, p. 588, note 1.
  13. ^ Muktananda (1971) [page # needed]
  14. ^ Muktananda (1971) [page # needed]
  15. ^ (July 26, 1976) "Instant Energy". Time Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  16. ^ Hinduism Today, "Baba Muktananda's 'Meditation Revolution' Continues" (October 1992). Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  17. ^ Rodarmor, William (1983). "The Secret Life of Swami Muktananda" (Reprint). CoEvolution Quarterly. [page # needed]
  18. ^ Former SYDA Co-Guru Explains (April 1995). Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  19. ^ PRASAD Project. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  20. ^ Harris, Lis (November 14, 1994). "O Guru, Guru, Guru" (Reprint). The New Yorker. [page # needed]
  21. ^ Leaving Siddha Yoga website. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  22. ^ Muktabodha Webpage. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  23. ^ Sarah Caldwell (2001). "The Heart of the Secret: A Personal and Scholarly Encounter with Shakta Tantrism in Siddha Yoga" (Reprint). Nova Religio 5 (1): 9-51. 
  24. ^ The Siddha Yoga Practices. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  25. ^ Siddha Yoga Glossary page. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  26. ^ Siddha Yoga Holidays and Observances. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 26 is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the 1976 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lis Harris is a American journalist and author and was for 25 years a staff writer on The New Yorker magazine which she left in 1995. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Muktananda, Swami (1971). Play of Consciousness. SYDA Foundation. ISBN 0914602373.  Also cited as: Publisher=Siddha Yoga Publications; ISBN=0911307818
  • Tirtha, Swami Vishnu (1948). Devatma Shakti (Kundalini) Divine Power. India: Yoga Shri Peeth Trust.  1st edition (in English)
  • Tirumular (1991). Tirumantiram. India: Sri Ramakrishna Matt. , Second edition. (in Tamil, translated to English by Dr. B. Natarajan)
  • Winternitz, Maurice (1972). History of Indian Literature. New Delhi: Oriental Books Reprint Corporation.  Second revised reprint edition. Two volumes. First published 1927 by the University of Calcutta.

Further reading

  • Brooks, Douglas; Sabharathnam, S.P. (1997). Meditation Revolution: A History and Theology of the Siddha Yoga Lineage. Agama Press. ISBN 0965409600. 
  • Miller, Timothy; Gene Thursby (1991). "Siddha Yoga: Swami Muktanada and the Seat of Power", When Prophets Die: The Postcharismatic Fate Of New Religious Movements. Albany: State University of New York Press, pp. 165-182. ISBN 0791407179. 
  • Pearce, Joseph Chilton (2003). Spiritual Initiation and the Breakthrough of Consciousness: The Bond of Power. Park Street Press. ISBN 0892819952. 
  • White, John Warren (1990). Kundalini, Evolution and Enlightenment. New York: Paragon House. ISBN 1557783039.  Professor Paul Zweig writes of his experience of receiving Shaktipat from Swami Muktananda in this anthology.

External links


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