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Encyclopedia > Siddha Sampradaya

The Sanskrit word Nath is the proper name of a siddha sampradaya (initiatory tradition) and the word itself literally means Lord, Protector, or Refuge. The related Sanskrit term Adi Nath means first or original Lord, and is therefore a synonym for Shiva, Mahadeva, or Maheshvara, and beyond these mental concepts, the Supreme Absolute Reality as the originator of all things. A Siddha in Sanskrit means One who is accomplished and refers to perfected masters who have transcended the Ahamkara (Ego or I-maker), have subdued their minds to be subservient to their Awareness, and have transformed their bodies composed of dense Rajo-tama Gunas into pure Satvic light. ... In Hinduism, a Sampradaya is a tradition serving as a spiritual channel and encompassing a common philosophy embraced by many schools, groups, or guru lineages (called parampara). ... The Sanskrit term Adi-Nath means first or original Lord, and is therefore a synonym for Shiva, Mahadeva, or Maheshvara, and beyond these mental concepts, the Supreme Reality as the originator of all things. ... This article is about the Hindu God Åšiva. ... Mahadeva is another name for Shiva, (from the Sanskrit Maha = great, Deva = God). ... Lord Shiva. ...


The Nath tradition is a heterodox siddha tradition containing many sub-sects. It was founded by Matsyendranath and further developed by Gorakshanath. These two individuals are also revered in Tibetan Buddhism as Mahasiddhas (great magicians) and are credited with great powers. A Siddha in Sanskrit means One who is accomplished and refers to perfected masters who have transcended the Ahamkara (Ego or I-maker), have subdued their minds to be subservient to their Awareness, and have transformed their bodies composed of dense Rajo-tama Gunas into pure Satvic light. ... Matshyendranath (9th-10th century) was one of the eighty-four Siddhas, and is the patron deity of Nepal. ... Mahavatar Babaji - a drawing from Autobiography of a Yogi Mahavatar Babaji is a Hindu saint, yogi, and culture hero first described by Paramahansa Yogananda in his best-selling Autobiography of a Yogi. ... Mahasiddhas are a type of eccentric yogis or adepts important in Tantric Buddhism. ...

Contents


The Nath Sampradaya

The Nath Sampradaya, a development of the earlier Siddha or Avadhut Sampradaya,[1] is an ancient lineage of spiritual masters. Its founding is traditionally ascribed to Shri Bhagavan Dattatreya, considered by some to have been an incarnation of Lord Shiva. [2] However, the establishment of the Naths as a distinct historical sect began around the 8th or 9th century with a simple fisherman, Matsyendranath (sometimes called Minanath, who may be identified with or called the father of Matsyendranath in some sources).[3] In Hinduism, a Sampradaya is a tradition serving as a spiritual channel and encompassing a common philosophy embraced by many schools, groups, or guru lineages (called parampara). ... A Siddha in Sanskrit means One who is accomplished and refers to perfected masters who have transcended the Ahamkara (Ego or I-maker), have subdued their minds to be subservient to their Awareness, and have transformed their bodies composed of dense Rajo-tama Gunas into pure Satvic light. ... Avadhut is a term from the spiritual traditions of India. ... In the Natha tradition, Dattatreya is recognized as an Avatar or incarnation of the Lord Shiva and as the Adi-Guru (First Teacher) of the Adi-Nath sampradaya of the Nathas. ... This article is about the Hindu God Åšiva. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ...


One story of the origin of the Nath teachings is that Matsyendranath was swallowed by a fish and while inside the fish overheard the teachings given by Lord Shiva to his wife Parvati, who had taken her to the bottom of the ocean in order to avoid being overheard. After being rescued from the fish by another fisherman, Matsyendranath took initiation as a sannyasin from Siddha Carpati. It was Matsyendranath who became known as the founder of the Nath Sampradaya. This article is about the Hindu God Śiva. ... Parvati (Sanskrit: पार्वती Pārvatī), sometimes spelled Parvathi or Parvathy, is a Hindu goddess. ... Sanyasa (pronounced sanyaas) symbolises the conception of the mystic life in Hinduism where a person is now integrated into the spiritual world after wholly giving up material life. ...


Matysendranath's two most important disciples were Caurangi and Gorakshanath. The latter came to eclipse his Master in importance in many of the branches and sub-sects of the Nath Sampradaya. Even today, Gorakshanath is considered by many to have been the most influential of the ancient Naths. He is reputed to have written the first books dealing with Laya yoga and the raising of the kundalini-shakti. He is also reputed to have been the original inventor of Hatha yoga. Mahavatar Babaji - a drawing from Autobiography of a Yogi Mahavatar Babaji is a Hindu saint, yogi, and culture hero first described by Paramahansa Yogananda in his best-selling Autobiography of a Yogi. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Kundalini is derived from a Sanskrit word meaning either coiled up or coiling like a snake. ... Hatha Yoga posture performed at a Hindu temple. ...


There are several temples in India dedicated to Gorakshanath. According to tradition, his samadhi shrine (tomb) resides at the Gorakhnath Temple in Gorakhpur. However, Bhagawan Nityananda has stated that the samadhi shrines of both Matsyendranath and Gorakshanath reside at Nath Mandir near the Vajreshwari temple about a kilometer from Ganeshpuri, Maharashtra, India. [1] The Gorakhnath temple is situated in the south of gorakhpur. ... Gorakhpur is a city in the eastern part of the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. ... Bhagavan Nityananda (1885 – August 7, 1961) was an Indian guru of the Kashmir Shaivism faith. ... Maharashtra (Devanagari: महाराष्ट्र, literally: Great Nation)( (help· info)) is Indias third largest state in terms of area and second largest in terms of population after Uttar Pradesh. ...


The Nath Sampradaya does not recognize caste barriers, and their teachings were adopted by outcasts and kings alike. The heterodox Nath tradition has many sub-sects, but all honor Matsyendranath and Gorakshanath as the founders of the tradition.


The traditional twelve Nath Panths

The Nath Sampradaya is traditionally divided into twelve streams or Panths. According to David Gordon White, these panths were not really a subdivision of a monolithic order, but rather an amalgamation of separate groups descended from either Matsyendranath, Gorakshanath or one of their students. [4] According to the Shri Amrit Nath Ashram website, the twelve Nath Panthi are as follows: Matshyendranath (9th-10th century) was one of the eighty-four Siddhas, and is the patron deity of Nepal. ... Mahavatar Babaji - a drawing from Autobiography of a Yogi Mahavatar Babaji is a Hindu saint, yogi, and culture hero first described by Paramahansa Yogananda in his best-selling Autobiography of a Yogi. ...

  • Satya nath
  • Dharam nath
  • Daria nath
  • Ayi Panthi
  • Vairaag ke
  • Ram ke
  • Kapilani
  • Ganga nathi
  • Mannathi
  • Rawal ke
  • Paav panth
  • Paagal panthi

However, there have always been many more Nath sects than will conveniently fit into the twelve formal panths. [5] Thus minor wandering sannyasin sub-sects such as the Adinath Sampradaya are typically either ignored or amalgamated into one or another of the formal panths. Sanyasa (pronounced sanyaas) symbolises the conception of the mystic life in Hinduism where a person is now integrated into the spiritual world after wholly giving up material life. ...


Modern Nath lineages

A recent modern Nath of the Adinath Sampradaya was Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (1911-1991), who received initiation in 1953 from H.H. Shri Sadguru Lokanath, the Avadhut of the Himalayas. In 1978, he founded the International Nath Order in order to make the Nath way of life available in the West. He wrote many essays and articles, some of which were collected as The Scrolls of Mahendranath, first published in 1990. His successor, Shri Kapilnath, continues to teach and initiate sincere seekers. Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, and Avadhut. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... Avadhut is a term from the spiritual traditions of India. ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... This article is about the year. ...


The Nath Initiation

The Nath Sampradaya is an initiatory Guru-shishya tradition. Membership in the sampradaya is always conferred by initiation (diksha) by a diksha-guru—either the lineage-holder or another member of the sampradaya whose ability to initiate has been recognized by his diksha-guru. The guru-shishya tradition (also guru-shishya parampara or lineage) is a spiritual relationship found within traditional Hinduism which is centered around the transmission of teachings from a guru (teacher, ) to a śiṣya (disciple, ). The term shishya roughly equates to the western term disciple, and in some parts of... In Hinduism, a Sampradaya is a tradition serving as a spiritual channel and encompassing a common philosophy embraced by many schools, groups, or guru lineages (called parampara). ... In Hinduism, diksha is the ritual of initiation into the worship of some deity by a guru (diksha guru) who bestows mantra(s) and takes the karma of the initiate - at least in case of Vaishnava diksha, as per Hari Bhakti Vilasa 1. ...


The Nath initiation itself is conducted inside a formal ceremony in which some portion of the awareness and spiritual energy (shakti) of the Guru is transmitted to the shishya (student). The neophyte, now a Nath, is also given a new name with which to support their new identity. This transmission or "touch" of the Guru is symbolically fixed by the application of ash to several parts of the body. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... References ^ Tirha, B. B. A Taste of Trascendence, (2002) p. ... The guru-shishya tradition (also guru-shishya parampara or lineage) is a spiritual relationship found within traditional Hinduism which is centered around the transmission of teachings from a guru (teacher, ) to a Å›iá¹£ya (disciple, ) . The term shishya roughly equates to the western term disciple, and in some parts of...


In The Phantastikos, Shri Gurudev Mahendranath, the final Guru of the Adinath Sampradaya, wrote, Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, and Avadhut. ...

"The passage of wisdom and knowledge through the generations required the mystic magick phenomenon of initiation, which is valid to this day in the initiation transmission from naked guru to naked novice by touch, mark, and mantra. In this simple rite, the initiator passes something of himself to the one initiated. This initiation is the start of the transformation of the new Natha. It must not be overlooked that this initiation has been passed on in one unbroken line for thousands of years. Once you receive the Nath initiation, it is yours throughout life. No one can take it from you, and you yourself can never renounce it. This is the most permanent thing in an impermanent life."[6]

The Aims of the Naths

According to Paul Eduardo Muller-Ortega, the primary aim of the ancient Nath Siddhas was to achieve liberation or jivan-mukti during their current lifespan. [7] According to a recent Nath Guru, Shri Gurudev Mahendranath, another aim was to avoid reincarnation. In The Magick Path of Tantra, he wrote about several of the aims of the Naths, This article is about a religious term. ... Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, and Avadhut. ... Past Lives redirects here. ...

"Our aims in life are to enjoy peace, freedom, and happiness in this life, but also to avoid rebirth onto this Earth plane. All this depends not on divine benevolence, but on the way we ourselves think and act." [8]

See also

Concepts

The Sanskrit term Sahaja means natural joy, amoral, elevating all worldly things to a divine status, to dissolve natural senses into divine expression. ... Sama or Samal is an Austronesian language in the Sulu Archipelago. ... The Sanskrit term Samarasa means equipoise in feelings, non-discriminating, the mind at rest. ... In Hinduism, a Sampradaya is a tradition serving as a spiritual channel and encompassing a common philosophy embraced by many schools, groups, or guru lineages (called parampara). ... Svecchachara is the Sanskrit equivalent of the Greek word Thelema, interpreted by Aleister Crowley as Do What Thou Wilt. ...

Sub-sects

Nandinatha Sampradaya is a denomination of the Hindu religion that places great importance on the practice of yoga. ... Navnath are the nine saints in the Hindu mythology. ...

Legendary Naths

The Sanskrit term Adi-Nath means first or original Lord, and is therefore a synonym for Shiva, Mahadeva, or Maheshvara, and beyond these mental concepts, the Supreme Reality as the originator of all things. ... Matshyendranath (9th-10th century) was one of the eighty-four Siddhas, and is the patron deity of Nepal. ... Mahavatar Babaji - a drawing from Autobiography of a Yogi Mahavatar Babaji is a Hindu saint, yogi, and culture hero first described by Paramahansa Yogananda in his best-selling Autobiography of a Yogi. ...

Past Teachers & Gurus

For the Indian town, see Haridwar Hardwar (sometimes stylized HardW[a]r or given the full name Hardwar: The Future Is Greedy) is a 1998 science fiction simulation computer game developed by the Software Refinery and published by Interplay and Gremlin Interactive. ... Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, and Avadhut. ... References ^ Tirha, B. B. A Taste of Trascendence, (2002) p. ... Nisargadatta Maharaj near the end of his life. ... Navnath are the nine saints in the Hindu mythology. ... Sivaya Subramuniyaswami (1927 - 2001), affectionately known as Gurudeva, was born in Oakland, California on January 5th, 1927. ... Nandinatha Sampradaya is a denomination of the Hindu religion that places great importance on the practice of yoga. ...

Living Teachers & Gurus

Gorakhpur is a city in the eastern part of the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. ... Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, and Avadhut. ... Shri Amrit Nath Ashram is a Nath ashram located in Fatehpur, a small village in the Shekhawati region of Rajasthan, India. ... Shri Amrit Nath Ashram is a Nath ashram located in Fatehpur, a small village in the Shekhawati region of Rajasthan, India. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Deshpande (1986)
  2. ^ Mahendranath (1990), Notes on Pagan India
  3. ^ White (1996)
  4. ^ White (1996)
  5. ^ White (1996)
  6. ^ Mahendranath (1990), The Phantastikos
  7. ^ Muller-Ortega (1989)
  8. ^ Mahendranath (1990), The Magick Path of Tantra
  9. ^ White (1996)
  10. ^ White (1996)
  11. ^ White (1996)

References

  • Adityanath (2002). Nath FAQ. Retrieved Oct. 20, 2004.
  • Deshpande, M.N. (1986). The Caves of Panhale-Kaji. New Delhi: Archaeological Survey of India, Government of India.
  • Mahendranath, Shri Gurudev (1990). The Scrolls of Mahendranath. Retrieved Mar. 6, 2006.
  • Muller-Ortega, Paul Eduardo (1989). The Triadic Heart of Shiva. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
  • White, David Gordon (1996). The Alchemical Body. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Shri Gurudev Mahendranath (April 29, 1911–August 30, 1991) was a British occultist, mystic, writer, poet, sannyasi, tantric guru, and Avadhut. ...

External links

  • International Nath Order
  • Shri Amrit Nath Ashram
  • The Nath Tradition

 
 

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