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Encyclopedia > Sick man of Europe

The term "Sick Man of Europe" is a nickname associated with a European country experiencing a time of economic difficulty and/or poverty. // A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things proper name (for example, Bob, Rob, Robbie, Robin, and Bert are possible nicknames for Robert). ...

Contents

Origin

The phrase "sick man of Europe" is commonly attributed to Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, referring to the Ottoman Empire, because it was increasingly falling under the financial control of the European powers and had lost territory in a series of disastrous wars. However, it is not clear that he ever said the precise phrase. Letters from Sir G.H. Seymour, the British ambassador to St. Petersburg, to Lord John Russell, in 1853, in the run up to the Crimean War, quote Nicholas I of Russia as saying that the Ottoman Empire was a a sick man—a very sick man", a "man" who "has fallen into a state of decrepitude", or a "sick man ... gravely ill".[1][2][3] Graphical timeline Decline of the Ottoman Empire covers the military and political events between 1828 to 1908. ... Nicholas I (Russian: Николай I Павлович, Nikolai I Pavlovich), July 6 (June 25, Old Style), 1796–March 2 (18 February Old Style), 1855), was the Emperor of Russia from 1825 until 1855, known as one of the most reactionary of the Russian monarchs. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... John Russell is the name of several notable individuals, including: Lord John Russell, 1st Earl Russell – British Prime Minister (It is generally considered incorrect to refer to Lord John Russell as John Russell, because his honorifix was treated as part of his name and did not indicate a peerage. ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire United Kingdom Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,050 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1854–1856) was fought... Nicholas I (Russian: Николай I Павлович, Nikolai I Pavlovich), July 6 (June 25, Old Style), 1796–March 2 (18 February Old Style), 1855), was the Emperor of Russia from 1825 until 1855, known as one of the most reactionary of the Russian monarchs. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI...


Later, this view led the Allies in World War I to underestimate the Ottoman Empire, leading in part to the disastrous Dardanelles Campaign. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Battle of Gallipoli Conflict First World War Date 19 February 1915 - 9 January 1916 Place Gallipoli peninsula, Turkey Result Ottoman victory The Battle of Gallipoli took place on the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli in 1915 during the First World War. ...


Modern use

Beginning in the late 1950s and into the early 1980s, the United Kingdom was sometimes known as the sick man of Europe because of industrial strife and poor economic performance compared to other European countries, partly because of World War II. Spain had such a nickname due to the economic difficulties during the last years of Francisco Franco's reign and the period following the dictator's death until circa 1983. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco Bahamonde (4 December 1892–20th (or possibly 19th) November[1] 1975), commonly abbreviated to Francisco Franco (pron. ...


The Republic of Ireland was also known by this term during a long period of poverty, before the Celtic Tiger (a nickname for Ireland's booming economy) grew in the 1980s, creating thousands of jobs and making the Irish economy one of the fastest growing in western Europe. The term was also used in describing Portugal before the Portuguese economy made a recovery in the 1990s. Cartoon of the Celtic Tiger. ...


Since the early 1990s, Russia and most of Eastern Europe received such nickname due to the severe economic hardships of the time, as well as the soaring rates in alcoholism, drug abuse, and AIDS that led to a negative population growth and falling life expectancies (although, in recent years, it has shown signs of slowing down).


The term was applied to the Russian Federation more recently in the book "Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin's Russia and the End of Revolution" by Peter Baker and Susan Glasser (Scribner). In this book, chapter nine is titled "Sick Man of Europe."


In the late 1990s, the press labeled Germany with this term because of its economic problems, especially due to the costs of German reunification after 1990, which are estimated to amount to over €1.5 trillion (statement of Freie Universität Berlin). For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) German reunification (German: ) took place on October 3, 1990, when the areas of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR, in English commonly called East Germany) were incorporated into the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG, in English... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ...


In May 2005, The Economist attributed this title to Italy, covering "The real sick man of Europe". This refers to Italy's structural and political difficulties thought to inhibit economic reforms to relaunch economic growth. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ...


In 2006, Mark Steyn calls Russia the "sick man of Europe" in the book America Alone: The End of the World as We Know It. This diagnosis is based on Russia's demographic profile, which is a main theme of the book. For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Mark Steyn (born 1959) is a Canadian journalist, columnist, and film and music critic. ...


In 2007, a report by Morgan Stanley referred to France as the "new sick man of Europe".[4] 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is an investment bank, retail broker, and credit card provider headquartered in New York City. ...


In April 2007, The Economist described Portugal as "a new sick man of Europe".[5] 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ...


See also

The term sick man of Asia or sick man of East Asia (Traditional Chinese: 東亞病夫 or 亞洲病夫) refers to the the Chinese Empire in the late 19th and early 20th centuries when it was defeated by Western and Japanese powers and was forced to make territorial concessions. ...

References

  1. ^ de Bellaigue, Christopher. "Turkey's Hidden Past". New York Review of Books, 48:4, 2001-03-08. http://www.nybooks.com/articles/14094#fnr1
  2. ^ de Bellaigue, Christopher. "'The Sick Man of Europe'". New York Review of Books, 48:11, 2001-07-05. http://www.nybooks.com/articles/14094#fnr1
  3. ^ "Ottoman Empire." Britannica Student Encyclopedia. 2007. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 19 Apr. 2007 http://www.britannica.com/ebi/article-206012
  4. ^ Chaney, Eric. "The New Sick Man of Europe". Morgan Stanley, 2007-03-02. http://www.morganstanley.com/views/gef/archive/2007/20070302-Fri.html#anchor4498
  5. ^ "A new sick man of Europe", The Economist, 2007-04-14. http://www.economist.com/world/europe/displaystory.cfm?story_id=9009032

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lawrence of Arabia . Emerging Middle East . Ottoman: Sick Man of Europe | PBS (99 words)
The Ottoman Empire in 1914 was commonly known as 'the sick man of Europe', a sign that the once-great power was crumbling.
The Turks had dominated the Eastern Mediterranean for half a millennium, controlling vast swathes of Central Europe, Arab lands as far down as Egypt and had at one stage been knocking on the doors of Vienna and Venice.
The Ottoman Empire existed for more than 500 years stretching across Central Europe and the Middle East.
Chapter 55. The Transference of Evil. § 4. The Transference of Evil in Europe. Frazer, Sir James George. 1922. ... (1491 words)
People in the Orkney Islands will sometimes wash a sick man, and then throw the water down at a gateway, in the belief that the sickness will leave the patient and be transferred to the first person who passes through the gate.
Often in Europe, as among savages, an attempt is made to transfer a pain or malady from a man to an animal.
Grave writers of antiquity recommended that, if a man be stung by a scorpion, he should sit upon an ass with his face to the tail, or whisper in the animal’s ear, “A scorpion has stung me”; in either case, they thought, the pain would be transferred from the man to the ass.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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