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Encyclopedia > Sibyrtius

Sibyrtius (in Greek Σιβυρτιoς; lived 4th century BC) was a Macedonian officer in the service of Alexander the Great, who was appointed by him, on his return from India (326 BC), governor of the province of Carmania. This post he shortly after exchanged for the more important satrapy of Arachosia and Gedrosia, to which he succeeded on the death of Thoas.1 At the death of Alexander (323 BC), Sibyrtius, in common with most of the other governors of the remote eastern provinces, retained possession of his satrapy, which was again confirmed to him in the second partition at Triparadisus, 321 BC.2 In the subsequent divisions which arose among the eastern satraps, Sibyrtius was one of those who supported Peucestas against Peithon and Seleucus, and afterwards accompanied that leader when he joined Eumenes in Susiana, 317 BC. His attachment was, however, to Peucestas, and not to Eumenes, and in the intrigues of the former against his commander-in-chief, Sibyrtius supported him so strongly that he incurred the especial resentment of Eumenes, who threatened to bring him to trial; a fate from which he only escaped by a hasty flight. But this open rupture with Eumenes had the advantage of securing him the favour of Antigonus, who, after the defeat of his rival, confirmed Sibyrtius in his satrapy, and placed under his command a large part of the select body of troops termed Argyraspids; a measure adopted with the ostensible object of guarding these provinces against the neighbouring barbarians, but in reality with a view to the gradual destruction of the troops in question, whose turbulent and disaffected spirit was well known.3 No further mention is found of Sibyrtius. (5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) // Events Invasion of the Celts into Ireland Battle of the Allia and subsequent Gaulish sack of Rome 383 BCE Second Buddhist Councel at Vesali. ... Alexander the Great (in Greek , transliterated Megas Alexandros) (July 356 BC – June 11, 323 BC), King of Macedon (336–323 BC), is considered one of the most successful military commanders in world history, conquering most of the world known to the ancient Greeks before his death. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 331 BC 330 BC 329 BC 328 BC 327 BC - 326 BC - 325 BC 324 BC 323... Kerman is a province rich in historical sites and monuments. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Arachosia is the ancient name of an area that corresponds to the southern part of today s Afghanistan, around the city of Kandahar. ... Gedrosia is the ancient name of an area that corresponds to the southernwestern part of today s Pakistan, from the Indus River to the areas of Baluchistan and Makran. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 328 BC 327 BC 326 BC 325 BC 324 BC - 323 BC - 322 BC 321 BC 320... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 326 BC 325 BC 324 BC 323 BC 322 BC - 321 BC - 320 BC 319 BC 318... Peucestas (in Greek Πευκεστας;lived 4th century BC) was son of Alexander, a native of the town of Mieza, in Macedonia, and a distinguished officer in the service of Alexander the Great. ... Peithon (about 355 BC - about 314 BC) was the son of Crateuas, a nobleman from Eordia in western Macedonia. ... Silver coin of Seleucus. ... Eumenes of Cardia (c. ... Elam (Persian: ایلام) is one of the most ancient civilizations on record. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 322 BC 321 BC 320 BC 319 BC 318 BC 317 BC 316 BC 315 BC 314... Antigonus I Cyclops or Monophthalmos (the One-eyed, so called from his having lost an eye) (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great. ...


References

Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... Boston is a town and small port c. ...

Notes

1 Arrian, Anabasis Alexandri, vi. 27; Curtius Rufus, Historiae Alexandri Magni, ix. 10
2 Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca, xviii. 3; Justin, Epitome of Pompeius Trogus, xiii. 4; Photius, Bibliotheca, cod. 82, cod. 92
3 Diodorus, xix. 14, 23, 48; Polyaenus, Stratagemata, iv. 6

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology by William Smith (1867). Lucius Flavius Arrianus Xenophon (c 92-c 175), known in English as Arrian, was a Roman historian. ... Anabasis Alexandri The Campaigns of Alexander by Arrian is the most important source on Alexander the Great. ... Quintus Curtius Rufus was a Roman historical writer in the first or second century AD, generally thought to have written under the reign of Claudius. ... Diodorus Siculus (ca. ... Justin or Marcus Junianus Justinus or Justinus Frontinus, 3rd century Roman historian. ... Photius (b. ... Polyaenus (died 278 BC), born in Macedonia, was a Greek rhetorician who served as military commander in the Roman army. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Alcibiades. Plutarch. 1909-14. Plutarch’s Lives. The Harvard Classics (10584 words)
In consequence of which, it ceased to be reckoned amongst the liberal accomplishments, and became neglected.
Antiphon also says, that he killed one of his own servants with the blow of a staff in Sibyrtius’ wrestling ground.
But it is unreasonable to give credit to all that is objected by an enemy, who makes open profession of his design to defame him.
The Internet Classics Archive | The Acharnians by Aristophanes (6791 words)
These fellows make signs like any Greek; I am sure that they are nothing but Athenians.
I recognize one of these eunuchs; it is Clisthenes, the son of Sibyrtius.
Behold the effrontery of this shaven and provocative arse!
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