FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Shrove Tuesday
Pancakes with strawberry syrup and black currants
Pancakes with strawberry syrup and black currants

Shrove Tuesday is the term used in the United Kingdom,[1] Ireland,[2] and Australia[3] to refer to the day after Shrove Monday (or the more old fashioned Collop Monday) and before Ash Wednesday (the liturgical season of Lent begins on Ash Wednesday). In these countries, particularly Ireland, and amongst Anglicans, Lutherans and possibly other Protestant denominations in Canada including Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, this day is also known as Pancake Day or Pancake Tuesday, because it is customary to eat pancakes on this day.[4][5][6] In other parts of the world—for example, in historically Catholic and French-speaking parts of the United States and elsewhere—this day is called Mardi Gras. In areas with large Polish-immigrant populations (for example, Chicago) it is known as Paczki Day. And in areas with large German-immigrant populations (for example, Pennsylvania Dutch Country) it is known as Fasnacht Day (also spelled Fausnacht Day and Fauschnaut Day). Image File history File links Pancakes_shrove_tuesday. ... Image File history File links Pancakes_shrove_tuesday. ... Binomial name Ribes nigrum L. The blackcurrant is a temperate shrub which produces small edible berries with a high natural vitamin C content, which are very dark purple/blue in colour—almost black—hence the name. ... Shrove Monday, sometimes known as Collop Monday, Rose Monday, Merry Monday or Hall Monday, is the Monday before Ash Wednesday. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) (French: Eglise Evangelique Lutherienne au Canada) is Canadas largest Lutheran denomination, with 182,077 baptized members in 624 congregations. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Two pancakes with maple syrup. ... For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... Polish-American refers to American citizens of Polish descent. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Traditional pÄ…czki Assorted pÄ…czki in America PÄ…czki (Polish: pÄ…czki, pronounced:   or MP3 File) are traditional Polish doughnuts. ... German Americans are citizens of the United States of German ancestry. ... Pennsylvania Dutch Country refers to an area of southeastern Pennsylvania that has a high percentage of Amish, Mennonite and Fancy Dutch inhabitants and where the Pennsylvania German language was historically common. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Shrove_Tuesday. ...


The French also have a festival associated with pancakes (crêpes) which is held on February 2 each year. This festival is called Chandeleur and is a celebration of light (the name is derived from the word "chandelle" which also gave the English word "candle". The festival is known as Candlemas in English). It is thought that pancakes are associated to this celebration because of the solar symbolism of their shape and color. A traditional food for Mardi Gras are sweet fried dumplings, cenci, usually served in the shape of a loose knot (a 5cm wide, 20cm long strip of dough one extremity of which is passed through a slit in its middle.) In New Orleans the traditional food is king cake. A sweet crêpe opened up, with whipped cream and strawberry sauce on it A sweet crêpe rolled up, ready to be eaten A crêpe is a thin pancake, a meal made of wheat popular throughout Europe and elsewhere. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Candlemas (Russian: Sretenie, Spanish: Candelaria) is a Christian feast commemorating the purification of the Virgin Mary and the presentation of the infant Jesus in the Temple. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Le gâteau des Rois, by Jean-Baptiste Greuze, 1774 (Musée Fabre) A king cake (sometimes rendered as kingcake) is a type of cake associated with Carnival traditions. ...


The reason that pancakes are associated with the day preceding Lent is that the 40 days of Lent form a period of liturgical fasting, during which only the plainest foodstuffs may be eaten. Therefore, rich ingredients such as eggs, milk, and sugar are disposed of immediately prior to the commencement of the fast. Pancakes and doughnuts were therefore an efficient way of using up these perishable goods, besides providing a minor celebratory feast prior to the fast itself [2]. It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Fasting is primarily the act of willingly abstaining from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. ...


The word shrove is a past tense of the English verb "shrive," which means to obtain absolution for one's sins by confessing and doing penance.[7] Shrove Tuesday gets its name from the shriving (confession) that Anglo-Saxon Christians were expected to receive immediately before Lent.[8] Absolution in a liturgical church refers to the pronouncement of Gods forgiveness of sins. ... For other uses, see Sin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Penance (disambiguation). ... This article is about the practice of confession in the Modern confessional in the Church of the Holy Name, Dunedin, New Zealand. ...


Shrove Tuesday is the last day of "shrovetide," which is the English equivalent to the Carnival tradition that developed separately out of the countries of Latin Europe. In countries of the Carnival tradition, the day before Ash Wednesday is known either as the "Tuesday of Carnival" (in Spanish-speaking countries, "Martes de Carnaval," in Portuguese-speaking countries, "Terça-feira de Carnaval", in German "Faschingsdienstag") or "Fat Tuesday" (in Portuguese-speaking countries "Terça-feira Gorda", in French-speaking countries, "Mardi Gras," in Italian-speaking countries, "Martedì Grasso"). In Estonian, Mardipäev. This article describes the festival season. ... Latin Europe Latin Europe (Italian, Portuguese and Spanish: Europa latina; French: Europe latine; Romanian: Europa latină; Catalan: Europa llatina; Franco-Provençal: Eropa latina) is composed of those nations and areas in Europe that speak a Romance language and are seen as having a distinct culture from the Germanic and... This article describes the festival season. ...


The term "Shrove Tuesday" is not widely known in the United States,[9][10] especially in those regions that celebrate Mardi Gras on the day before Ash Wednesday. For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Shrove Tuesday tradition in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia

Pancake Day

In United Kingdom,[11] Ireland,[12] and Australia,[13] Shrove Tuesday is known colloquially as Pancake Day. The traditional pancake is slightly thicker than a French crêpe. It is served immediately and is traditionally served with a sprinkling of caster sugar (confectionery, superfine or powdered sugar in the United States) and a dash of fresh lemon juice or with syrup. Many other sweet and savoury toppings are used today. Two pancakes with maple syrup. ... The base material for multiple crêpes A sweet crêpe opened up, with whipped cream and strawberry sauce on it A crêpe (pronounced IPA /kreɪp/, French /kʀɛp/) is a type of very thin raw fish usually made grown in the ocean or sea. ...


In Australia, UnitingCare Australia (the social services arm of the Uniting Church in Australia) has promoted Pancake Day as a nation-wide community event that raises awareness for the plight of disadvantaged people by raising money for UnitingCare's work.[14] UnitingCare Australia is the Uniting Church in Australias (UCA) umbrella community services body. ... Logo of the UCA The Uniting Church in Australia (UCA) was formed on June 22, 1977 when the Methodist Church of Australasia, Presbyterian Church of Australia and Congregational Union of Australia came together under the Basis of Union document. ...


Shrove Tuesday traditions particular to the United Kingdom

Pancake races

On Pancake Day, pancake races are held in villages and towns across the United Kingdom.[15] In 1634 William Fennor wrote in his Palinodia: Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement...

"And tosse their Pancakes up for feare they burne."

But the tradition of pancake racing had started long before that. The most famous pancake race, at Olney in Buckinghamshire, has been held since 1445. The contestants, traditionally women, carry a frying pan (skillet) and race to the finishing line tossing the pancakes as they go. As the pancakes are thin, some skill is required to toss them successfully while running. The winner is the first to cross the line having tossed the pancake a certain number of times. Olney is a small town near Milton Keynes, England with a population of around 6,000 people. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Events Discovery of Senegal and Cape Verde by Dinas Diaz Births March 1 - Sandro Botticelli, Italian painter (died 1510) March 16 - Johann Geiler von Kaisersberg, Swiss-born preacher (died 1510) Albert Brudzewski, Polish astronomer (died 1497) Nicolas Chuquet, French mathematician Deaths June 5 - Leonel Power, English composer June 11 - Henry... “Skillet” redirects here. ...


The tradition is said to have originated when a housewife from Olney was so busy making pancakes, that she forgot the time until she heard the church bells ringing for the service. She raced out of the house to church while still carrying her frying pan and pancake. Church bell from Saleby, Västergötland, Sweden containing an inscription from 1228 in the Runic alphabet A church bell is a bell which is rung in a (especially Christian) church either to signify the hour or the time for worshippers to go to church, perhaps to attend a wedding...


Since 1950 the people of Liberal, Kansas, USA and Olney have held the "International Pancake Day" race between the two towns. The two towns' competitors race along an agreed-upon course, and the times of all of the two towns' competitors are compared, to determine a winner. After the 2007 race, Liberal was leading with 32 wins to Olney's 25.[16] Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberal is a city in Seward County, Kansas, United States. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ...


The Pancake Greaze

Another local tradition, the Pancake Greaze, takes place every year at Westminster School in London. A pancake, reinforced with horsehair, is prepared in advance and on Shrove Tuesday tossed into the air "up School". The boys at the school then attempt to get as much of it as they can. See the Customs section of the Westminster School article. For other uses, see Westminster School (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Horsehair refers to hair taken from the mane or tail of horses. ... For other uses, see Westminster School (disambiguation). ...


Shrove Tuesday Football

Many towns throughout England held traditional Shrove Tuesday football ('Mob Football') games dating as far back as the 12th century. The practice mostly died out with the passing of the Highway Act 1835, which banned the playing of football on public highways, but a number of towns have managed to maintain the tradition to the present day including Alnwick in Northumberland, Ashbourne in Derbyshire (called the Royal Shrovetide Football Match), Atherstone (called the Ball Game) in Warwickshire, Sedgefield (called the Ball Game) in County Durham, and St Columb Major (called Hurling the Silver Ball) in Cornwall. Goals are about 3 miles away from each other and it can last up to 3 days For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mediæval football. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Highway Act 1835 is a UK act of Parliament In 1835, the British Highways Act banned the playing of football on public highways, with a maximum penalty of forty shillings. ... For the parish in New Brunswick, see Alnwick, New Brunswick Alnwick (pronounced anick ) is a small market town in north Northumberland, in the north-east of England. ... Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. ... Ashbourne is a small picturesque market town in the Derbyshire Dales, England. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... The Royal Shrovetide Football Match occurs annually on Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday in the town of Ashbourne in Derbyshire, England. ... , Atherstone is a town in Warwickshire, England. ... A detailed map Stratford-upon-Avon Kenilworth Castle Warwickshire (pronounced // or //) is a landlocked non-metropolitan county in central England. ... For other uses, see Sedgefield (disambiguation). ... Shrove Tuesday Football (or Mob Football) still takes place in Sedgefield in County Durham; locally it is known as the Ball Game. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ... Location within the British Isles. ... For the Irish sport of hurling, see Hurling Hurling the silver ball (Cornish: Hurlian) is an old sport found still in some parts of Cornwall, England. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ...


Other cultures that eat a particular food on the day before Ash Wednesday

  • In the Canadian province of Newfoundland, household objects are baked into the pancakes and served to family members. Rings, thimbles, thread, coins, and other objects all have meanings associated with them. The lucky one to find coins in their pancake will be rich, the finder of the ring will be the first married, and the finder of the thimble will be a seamstress or tailor. Children have great fun with the tradition, and often eat more than their fill of pancakes in search of a desired object.
  • In Estonia (Vastlapäev) and Finland (Laskiainen), this day is associated with hopes for the coming year. On this day, families go sledding and eat split pea and ham soup. A toy is made from the ham bone by tying the bone to a string and spinning it around to make a whistling noise. There is a tale told that if you cut your hair on this day, it will grow fast and thick for the next year.
  • In Hawaii, this day is also known as Malasada Day. Dating back to the days of the sugar plantations in the 1800s, the Portuguese immigrants would need to use up all of their butter and sugar prior to lent. They did so by making large batches of Malasada (Portuguese Doughnuts), which they would subsequently share with friends from all the other ethnic groups in the plantation camps. This led to the popularity of the Malasada in Hawaii. Still a tradition in Hawaii, Leonard's Bakery would experience long lines to purchase discounted Malasadas on this day.
  • In Iceland the day is known as "Sprengidagur" (Bursting day) and is marked with the eating of salt meat and peas.
  • In Pennsylvania, it is a Pennsylvania Dutch tradition to eat a type of doughnuts called Fastnachts (or Fasnachts). The Fastnacht would be made of all the sweets and other soon-to-be-forbidden items in the household and then consumed on Fat Tuesday so that one would not be tempted during the Lenten Fast. Today they are made from potato dough and fried, often coated with a sugary glaze.
  • In the Philippines a popular treat is bibingka, a pancake made from rice flour and topped with white cheese, butter, sugar, salted duck's egg, and coconut. Bibingka is baked on hot coals in a clay pot lined with a banana leaf. It is traditionally served with salabat or ginger tea.
  • In Poland, Pączki and Faworki are traditionally eaten on Fat Thursday (Polish: Tłusty czwartek), i.e. the one before Shrove Tuesday. However, in areas of Michigan with large Polish communities, they are eaten on "Fat Tuesday" due to French influence. Shrove Tuesday itself is sometimes referred to as "śledzik" ("little herring") and it is customary to have some pickled herring with vodka (Polish: wódka) that day.
  • In Sweden the day before Ash Wednesday is known as fettisdagen ("Fat Tuesday") in Swedish. The day is marked by eating a traditional pastry, called semla or fastlagsbulle, which is a sweet bun filled with almond paste and whipped cream. Originally, the pastry was only eaten on this day, served with hot milk, but eventually it became tradition to eat it on every Tuesday leading up to Easter, as the Protestant Swedes no longer observed Lent. Today, semlas are available in shops and bakeries every day from shortly after Christmas until Easter, and the semla is now often eaten as a regular pastry, without the hot milk. The semla is also traditional in Finland but is there usually filled with jam instead of marzipan.

This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... A malasada (or malassada) is a Portuguese confection related to the doughnut. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Two American-style pancakes A pancake is a batter cake fried in a pan or on a griddle with oil or butter. ... A chocolate-glazed doughnut A doughnut, or donut, is a deep-fried piece of dough or batter. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... The Pennsylvania Dutch (perhaps more strictly Pennsylvania Deitsch or Pennsylvanian German) are the descendants of German immigrants who came to Pennsylvania prior to 1800. ... Fastnachts, Fasnachts or Faschnachts are a fatty doughnut treat served primarily on Fastnacht Day, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday. ... For other uses, see Ginger (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tea (disambiguation). ... LUKASZ WOLOSYZN ... Faworki (also known as chrust, chrusty)¹ are traditional Polish sweet crispy biscuits in the shape of thin folded ribbons, deep-fried and sprinkled with powdered sugar. ... A plate of Polish pÄ…czki A queue outside a sweets bakery in Poland on Fat Thursday Fat Thursday (Polish TÅ‚usty czwartek, German Fettdonnerstag or Schmutziger Donnerstag) is a traditional Polish and German feast marking the last Thursday before Lent. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Species Clupea alba Clupea bentincki Clupea caspiopontica Clupea chrysotaenia Clupea elongata Clupea halec Clupea harengus Clupea inermis Clupea leachii Clupea lineolata Clupea minima Clupea mirabilis Clupea pallasii Clupea sardinacaroli Clupea sulcata Herrings are small oily fish of the genus Clupea found in the shallow, temperate waters of the North Atlantic... Vodka bottling machine, Shatskaya Vodka Shatsk, Russia Vodka (Polish: wódka, Russian: водка) is one of the worlds most popular distilled beverages. ... A typical semla. ... A typical semla. ... Cream is a dairy product that is composed of the higher-fat layer skimmed from the top of raw milk before homogenization. ...

Dates

The date can vary from as early as February 3 to as late as March 9. As it is the last day before the start of Lent, the date is dependent on that of Easter. is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ...


Shrove Tuesday (and Mardi Gras) will occur on the following dates in the following years:(carnevale) For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ...

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2010 (MMX) will be a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2011 (MMXI) will be a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2012 (MMXII) will be a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2014 (MMXIV) will be a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2015 (MMXV) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2016 (MMXVI) will be a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2017 (MMXVII) will be a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2018 (MMXVIII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ...

See also

This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... For the Irish sport of hurling, see Hurling Hurling the silver ball (Cornish: Hurlian) is an old sport found still in some parts of Cornwall, England. ... Mardi Gras in Mobile: the Order of Myths parade. ... A plate of Polish pÄ…czki A queue outside a sweets bakery in Poland on Fat Thursday Fat Thursday (Polish TÅ‚usty czwartek, German Fettdonnerstag or Schmutziger Donnerstag) is a traditional Polish and German feast marking the last Thursday before Lent. ... Fastnachts, Fasnachts or Faschnachts are a fatty doughnut treat served primarily on Fastnacht Day, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday. ... Boris Kustodiev Maslenitsa tuesday Maslenitsa or Pancake week (Russian: , also called Pancake week) is a Russian folk holiday that dates back to the pagan times. ... Nickanan night is the Cornish version of Mischief night traditionally held on the Monday before Ash Wednesday. ... A Jif Lemon. ... The village of Tolox Powder Day or Day of the Powder, (Spanish: Dia de los Polvos) is celebrated in the southern Spanish village of Tolox on Shrove Tuesday, the final day of the annual Tolox carnival. ... Bonfire of the Vanities refers to an event on 7 February 1497 when followers of the priest Girolamo Savonarola collected and publicly burned thousands of objects in Florence, Italy, on the Shrove Tuesday festival. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Pancake Day (Shrove Tuesday). British Embassy, Washington D.C.. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  2. ^ Shrove Tuesday - Pancake Day!. Irish Culture and Customs. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  3. ^ Easter in Australia. The Australian Government Culture and Recreation Portal. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  4. ^ Shrove Tuesday - Pancake Day!. Irish Culture and Customs. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  5. ^ Pancake Day (Shrove Tuesday) in the UK. British Embassy, Washington D.C.. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  6. ^ Easter in Australia. The Australian Government Culture and Recreation Portal. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  7. ^ "Shrive." The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004.
  8. ^ Shrove Tuesday. British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  9. ^ Mardi Gras. St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  10. ^ National Celebrations: Holidays in the United States. U.S. State Department. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  11. ^ Pancake Day (Shrove Tuesday) in the UK. British Embassy, Washington D.C.. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  12. ^ Shrove Tuesday - Pancake Tuesday!. Irish Culture and Customs. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  13. ^ Easter in Australia. The Australian Government Culture and Recreation Portal. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  14. ^ UnitingCare's Pancake Day [1] accessed 18 February 2007
  15. ^ Pancake Day (Shrove Tuesday) in the UK. British Embassy, Washington D.C.. Retrieved on 17 November 2006.
  16. ^ = 17 November Shrove Tuesday. British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).

17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Shrove Tuesday (1181 words)
Shrove Tuesday is the term used in the English-speaking countries of the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Australia to refer to the day before Ash Wednesday (the liturgical season of Lent begins on Ash Wednesday).
Shrove Tuesday is the last day of "shrovetide," which is the English equivalent to the Carnival tradition that developed separately out of the countries of Latin Europe.
Shrove Tuesday itself is sometimes referred to as "śledzik" ("little herring") and it is customary to have some pickled herring with vodka (wódka) that day.
Shrove Tuesday - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1237 words)
In the Christian calendar, Shrove Tuesday is the English name for the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, which in turn marks the beginning of Lent.
In Ireland, and Canada, Shrove Tuesday is known as Pancake Tuesday, while in Britain it is popularly known as Pancake Day.
Until the early 1900s, Shrove Tuesday was a half-day holiday, and the "Shriving Bell" was rung at eleven o'clock in the morning to remind people that the holiday had begun.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m