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Encyclopedia > Shot glass
Typical modern shot glasses
Typical modern shot glasses

A shot glass is a small glass designed to hold or measure one to three ounces of liquor, to be poured into a mixed drink, or drunk straight from the glass (a "shot"). The modern thick-walled shot glass probably originated in the United States during the Prohibition era, and the term "shot glass" or "shotglass" first appeared in print in the 1940s. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 758 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3136 × 2480 pixel, file size: 387 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 758 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3136 × 2480 pixel, file size: 387 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... A glass is a drinking vessel made from glass. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ...


Jigger or pony is an earlier name for a container used to measure or drink a standard quantity of liquor. A small glass holding a shot of liquor is called a whiskey. American distilleries distributed thin whiskey glasses bearing etched advertising between the late 19th century and the beginning of Prohibition. A jigger (pen included for scale) A jigger or measure is a bartending tool used to measure liquor, which is typically then poured into a cocktail shaker. ... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ...


Shot glasses decorated with a wide variety of advertising, humorous pictures, and toasts are popular souvenirs and collectibles. Pre-prohibition whiskey glasses are also highly collectible.

Contents

Origin

A shot glass with the Virginia Tech university seal; filled with Rum.
A shot glass with the Virginia Tech university seal; filled with Rum.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word shotglass first appeared in print in the 1950s. There are many apocryphal stories about its origin, but none of them stand up to scrutiny. They all place the origin at least decades before the word or phrase shows up in print; or they describe an item that had nothing to do with drinking liquor. If any of them are true, the word should have appeared in print long before it did. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 437 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1021 × 1400 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 437 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1021 × 1400 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... This article is about the beverage. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of...


Many references from the 1800s describe giving workers who were digging canals a jigger of whiskey or rum. Most shotglasses are found in America, and shotglasses from before the 1940s are very rare. The word shotglass (or phrase shot glass) does not show up in print until the 1940s in The New York Times, in a story about an effort to regulate the size of a shot of liquor in New York; and did not come into common usage until much later. A jigger (pen included for scale) A jigger or measure is a bartending tool used to measure liquor, which is typically then poured into a cocktail shaker. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


If the origin of the shotglass was sparked by special circumstances in America, in the years before the Second World War, the likely candidates are The Great Depression, and Prohibition. Although most people associate the beginning of prohibition with the passage of the Volstead act, alcohol was locally prohibited in many locations years before the passage of the act (see local option). Since the Great Depression was a worldwide phenomenon, and shotglasses evolved only in America, the depression was probably not a major influence on the birth of the shotglass. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Volstead Act is the popular name for the National Prohibition Act (1919). ... Local option is the freedom in the United states whereby local political jurisdictions, typically counties or municipalities, can decide by popular vote certain controversial issues within their borders. ...


The obvious connection between Prohibition and the shotglass is they are both related to alcohol. Before Prohibition, thin-sided whiskey glasses were common [2]. After Prohibition, the shotglass with thick base and sides had replaced them.


The Old West

The most popular origin story is that the shot glass originated in the saloons of the old west. The story explains that the cowboys of the old west would trade a cartridge (bullet plus powder and primer encased in brass) for a small amount of alcohol. One problem with this story is that, even if true, your average old west saloon would not be able to “commission” the creation of a new style of glass to fill this purpose – even today many bars do not stock shotglasses; they serve shots in ordinary whiskey glasses. Another problem with this origin story is the economics of such a trade are such that it would never happen. Alcohol sold for much more than a single cartridge -- even today you can get anywhere from 50 to a couple hundred rounds of ammo (depending on caliber) for the same amount as a drink of alcohol. Judge Roy Bean’s Saloon in Langry, Texas Western saloons served such customers as fur trappers, cowboys, soldiers, gold prospectors and miners, and gamblers. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Bird or Buck Shot

Another origin story is that a "shot glass" was a glass used at the dinner table to place any "shot" left in your meat that you would find during a meal. However, people were shooting their food with shotguns for hundreds of years before the shotglass was born. Shotgun History There may have been a "shot glass" for this purpose, but our shotglass did not come from it. For other uses, see Shotgun (disambiguation). ...


Quill Pen Holder

Another story ties the origin of the "shot glass" to the use of quill pens. According to this story the term "shot glass" was coined over 100 years ago, describing a small, thick-walled glass placed on a writing desk, and filled with small lead BBs, or shot. A feather writing quill would be placed in the glass when not in use, and the lead shot would hold the quill upright. An upright quill was more easily removed from the glass.


Even if there was a "shot glass" used for quill pens, it was probably a different size and shape -- the thin base and wide top of a standard shotglass are quite unstable for inserting and removing a quill (or even just for having on a desk). A "shot glass" for holding a quill is more likely to have a small top and a large base, the opposite of what we know of as a shotglass. See http://www.libertybellmuseum.com/MuseumShop/quills.htm for sample quill holders


Firing Glass

An additional origin story ties the birth of the shotglass to the sound of a gunshot. Certain fraternal organizations have a custom of drinking toasts from specially shaped glasses known as cannons. Another name for these glasses are “firing glasses” which comes from the french calling the toast "feu" or "fire." If the glass is slammed on the table, it makes a sound like a gunshot – a firing glass then becomes a shotglass. The firing glass is much older than the shotglass, and the firing glass has a very specific shape (relatively thin sides, very thick protruding base), which is quite different than the shotglass. A fraternal organization, sometimes also known as a fraternity, is an organization that represents the relationship between its members as akin to brotherhood. ...


From the Word Shot Meaning "A Small Amount"

The word shot also means "dose" or "small amount", and pre-dates the use of the word "shot glass". Therefore, the small glasses are called shot glasses because they hold small amounts.


Friedrich Otto Schott, Ernst Abbe and Carl Zeiss

The word shot was originally spelled Schott, and named after Friedrich Otto Schott a German chemist and Glass Technologist who helped Ernst Abbe(a physicist), Carl Zeiss(an instrument maker) develop some of the first Optical lenses in Germany, many years before any of the above theories. Schott, Abbe and Zeiss, founded a glassworks factory in Jena, Germany in 1884. [1] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ernst Karl Abbe Ernst Karl Abbe (January 23, 1840 in Eisenach – January 14, 1905 in Jena), was a German physicist. ... Carl Zeiss (September 11, 1816 – December 3, 1888) was an optician commonly known for the company he founded, Zeiss. ...


This Jena glass has been theorized as the origin of the first "Schott Glass" and the source of the name, which was later shortened in the USA to "Shot Glass" and the original origin of the word forgotten.


Sizes

Drinkware

Beer glassware
Glass stemware Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Drinkware Drinkware or Beverageware is a general term for the class of vessels from which people drink. ... Beer glassware are the containers out of which beer is drunk. ...

Pilsner glass
Pint glass
Beer stein
Wheat beer glass
Yard glass

Cocktail (martini) glass
Collins glass
Highball glass
Old fashioned glass
Sake cup
Shot glass
Stemware
A pilsner glass. ... Image File history File links Pilsner_glass_silhouette. ... A pint glass is a drinking vessel holding a British pint (568ml; ≈1. ... Image File history File links Pint_glass. ... German Maßkrug of Augustiner Bräu. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (744 × 1052 pixel, file size: 9 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... German Weizenbier glass A wheat beer glass is a glass that is used to serve wheat beer, known also as Weizenbier or Weißbier. ... Image File history File links Wheat_beer_glass_silhouette. ... This article is about the measurement of beer known as the yard. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (744 × 1052 pixel, file size: 8 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... An amber tinted cocktail glass A cocktail glass is a narrow drinking glass having a stem and a wide, shallow, inverted cone fixed above it to hold liquid. ... Image File history File links Coctail_glass. ... FREQUENTLY INTERCHANGEABLE WITH THE HIGHBALL GLASS, BUT SLIGHTLY MORE NARROW, THIS TALL 10-TO14 OUNCE GLASS IS PERFEC NOT ONLY FOR COLLINSES, BUT FOR MANY MIXED DRINKS SERVED WITH ICE,SUCH AS THE MOJITO, ICED TEA, SEA BREEZE,AND FIZZY SUMMER COOLERS. A TALLER COLLINS GLASS,KNOWN AS CHIMNEY, HOLDS... Image File history File links Collins_glass_silhouette. ... A highball glass is a type of drinking vessel. ... Image File history File links Highball_glass_silhouette. ... An old fashioned glass The old fashioned glass is commonly found in bars and pubs, it is not very tall but is a little wider than the Hi-Ball, making it suitable for cocktails that have fewer ingredients. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (744 × 1052 pixel, file size: 7 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Sake set is a generic term for the flask and cups used to serve sake. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (744 × 1052 pixel, file size: 4 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Shot_glass. ... Stemware is drinkware that stands on stems above a base. ...

Wine glass
Brandy snifter
Champagne flute
Champagne coupe

United States To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (744 × 1052 pixel, file size: 10 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The term Snifter might refer to: A snifter glass Snifter - a type of stemware, a short-stemmed glass whose main vessel has a wide bottom but that narrows at the top. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (744 × 1052 pixel, file size: 10 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Champagne flute and bottle Champagne stemware refers to the flute and coupe stemware used in the enjoyment of champagne, other sparkling wines, and certain beers. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (744 × 1052 pixel, file size: 10 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Champagne flute and bottle Champagne stemware refers to the flute and coupe stemware used in the enjoyment of champagne, other sparkling wines, and certain beers. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (744 × 1052 pixel, file size: 8 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...


In the United States, the sizes of shot glasses are:

  • Single shot glass-- 1.5 fluid oz. ≈ 30 mL[2]
  • Double shot glass-- 2.0 fluid oz. ≈ 60 mL[3]

United Kingdom


In the UK, shot sizes are:

  • Single -- 25 or 35 ml
  • Double -- 50 or 70 ml

Finland


In Finland, the maximum amount of strong alcohol restaurants are allowed to serve at a time is regulated by the law to one portion of 40 ml per customer. Doubles cannot be legally served.

  • 20 ml
  • 40 ml

Germany


In Germany, shot glasses (German: Schnapsglas, Pinchen, Stamperl) are smaller:

  • Single -- 20 ml
  • Double -- 40 ml

Slovakia


In Slovakia, shots sizes are:

  • Small -- 20 or 25 ml
  • Single -- 40 or 50 ml (the most common "Pol deci" (literally "Half a decilitre"))
  • Double -- 80 or 100 ml

South Africa


The South African government has an official definition:

  • Shot -- 20 ml

References

  1. ^ [1] Encyclopædia Britannica
  2. ^ Rowlett, Russ. Units: S. How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  3. ^ Rowlett, Russ. Units: D. How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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