FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Shogun Warriors

Shogun Warriors were a line of toys, licensed by Mattel during the late 1970s that consisted of a series of imported Japanese robots all based on then-popular giant robot anime shows. They were originally manufactured in three sizes, the 24 inch plastic versions, the 3.5 inch diecast metal versions and the slightly taller but much more detailed and articulated 4" diecast versions. There were later offered special versions of the more popular robots that could be manipulated into an alternate configuration. Shogun Warriors included the following: Mattel Inc. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... // A scene from Cowboy Bebop (1998) Anime ) is the Japanese contraction and pronunciation of the English word animation, most popularly referring (but not limited) to the medium of animation originating in Japan, with distinctive character and background aesthetics that visually set it apart from other forms of animation (e. ...

The most attractive features on these toys were the spring loaded launcher weapons such as missiles, star shuriken, and battleaxes. Some robots were able to launch their fists. The later diecast versions of these toys were also attractive for the ability to transform into different shapes. Grandizer, for instance, was changeable into a saucerlike spaceship. These "convertable" editions were the precursors to the "Transformers" line of toy robots but unlike the later toyline it was not unusual for minor dissasembly to be required to achieve the secondary form. Also the second form was not always an apparently useful one, a "giant skull" for instance. Brave Raideen (勇者ライディーン - Yûsha Raidîn) is a super robot anime series. ... Getter Robo G (ゲッターロボG - Gettâ Robo Jî) is a Super Robot anime series created by Go Nagai and Ken Ishikawa and produced by Toei Animation. ... Dangard Ace was a giant robot from the popular Japanese anime of the same name. ... Mazinger Z The Movie DVD cover Mazinger Z (マジンガーZ or マジンガー・ゼット), also known as Tranzor Z, is the name of a manga by artist Go Nagai, first published in Japan in 1972, and turned into a long-running anime television series later in the same year. ... Great Mazinger(グレートマジンガー) is the name of a manga comic book and anime television series by manga artist Go Nagai, made as a direct continuation of the successful Mazinger Z series. ... Daikyuu Maryuu Gaiking (Japanese:大空魔竜ガイキング; In English Giant Sky Demon Dragon Gaiking) was a Super Robot mecha anime series produced by Toei Animation on an original idea by Akio Sugino (not Go Nagai, contrary to legend, even though his company, Dynamic Productions, co-produced the show from Episode 22 on, but... Getter Robo G (ゲッターロボG - Gettâ Robo Jî) is a Super Robot anime series created by Go Nagai and Ken Ishikawa and produced by Toei Animation. ... Choudenji Robo Combattler V is the first of Tadao Nagahamas Romantic Trilogy Categories: | | ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... UFO Robot Grendizer (UFOロボ グレンダイザーin Japanese, a. ... Godzilla , as portrayed during the late Heisei era (Godzilla vs. ... Rodan (Godzilla vs. ... Various Transformers toys. ...


Shogun Warriors was also licensed in 1979-1980 for a 20-issue Marvel comic written by Doug Moench where several of the robots (Raideen, Combatra, Dangard Ace) were incorporated into Marvel Universe stories. This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... Doug Moench, born February 23, 1948 in Chicago, Illinois, is a comic book writer. ... Various characters of the Marvel Universe. ...


Like certain other toylines of the 70s, the Shogun Warriors came under pressure due to safety concerns regarding their spring loaded weapons features. Toy manufacturers were facing new regulations due to reported child injuries as a result of playing with these toys. Consequently, many toy companies were forced to remodel existing toylines with child safe variations (such as spring loaded "action" missiles that would remain attached to the toy). For this reason, as well as decreasing sales, the Shogun Warriors toyline disappeared by 1980.


Several of the anime from this toyline were seen in the 80s as part of Jim Terry's Force Five series. A syndicated anime cartoon anthology during the early 1980s, it was produced by Jim Terry and consisted of five imported Japanese giant robot serials (originally produced in the mid-1970s). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Shogun Warriors - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (389 words)
Shogun Warriors were a line of toys, licensed by Mattel during the late 1970s that consisted of a series of imported Japanese robots all based on then-popular giant robot anime shows.
Shogun Warriors was also licensed in 1979-1980 for a 20-issue Marvel comic written by Doug Moench where several of the robots (Raideen, Combatra, Dangard Ace) were incorporated into Marvel Universe stories.
Like certain other toylines of the 70s, the Shogun Warriors came under pressure due to safety concerns regarding their spring loaded weapons features.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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