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Encyclopedia > Shogun

Shōgun (将軍:しょうぐん shōgun?) listen  is "supreme general of the samurai",a military rank and historical title in Japan. The rank is equivalent to "general," a high officer in an army.[1] As a title, it is the short form of sei-i taishōgun (征夷大将軍:せいいたいしょうぐん?). The governing individual at various times in the history of Japan, ending when Shogun Tokugawa Yoshinobu abdicated his authority to Emperor Meiji in 1867.[1] Image File history File links Minamoto_no_Yoritomo. ... Image File history File links Minamoto_no_Yoritomo. ... Portrait of Yoritomo (copy) Minamoto no Yoritomo May 9, 1147—February 9, 1199) was the founder and the first shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate of Japan, who ruled from 1192 until 1199. ... This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... Image File history File links Shogun. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The written history of Japan began with brief appearances in Chinese history texts from the first century CE. However, archaeological research indicates that people were living on the islands of Japan as early as the upper paleolithic period. ... Tokugawa Yoshinobu in French military uniform, c. ... Emperor Meiji ) (November 3, 1852 — July 30, 1912) was the 122nd emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from February 3, 1867 until his death. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


A shogun's office or administration is a "shogunate" or "bakufu" (幕府:ばくふ?), the latter of which literally means "an office in the tent" in Japanese, and suggests a "private government."[2] The tent is symbolic of the role of the military in fighting wars in the field but also denoted that such an office was meant to be temporary.


The term sei-i taishōgun means "great general who subdues the eastern barbarians."[1] "Eastern barbarian" is one of several ancient terms for various groups who lived in eastern area and had not yet become subject to the central government. Among them were the aboriginal Ainu people who once inhabited Honshū in addition to Hokkaidō. Ainu IPA: /ʔáınu/) are an ethnic group indigenous to Hokkaidō, northern HonshÅ«, the Kuril Islands, much of Sakhalin, and the southernmost third of the Kamchatka peninsula. ... HonshÅ« (本州 Literally Main State) is the largest island of Japan, called the Mainland; it is south of Hokkaido across the Tsugaru Strait, north of Shikoku across the Inland Sea, and northeast of Kyushu across the Kanmon Strait. ...   literally North Sea Circuit, Ainu: Mosir), formerly known as Ezo, Yezo, Yeso, or Yesso, is the second largest island and largest prefecture of Japan. ...


Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate, seized considerable power from the aristocracy in Kyoto. He became the practical ruler of Japan, and received the title sei-i taishōgun. Thereafter, the heads of three successive shogunates received the same title. It continued in use until the Meiji Restoration that Shogun was the de facto king/emperor of Japan. Portrait of Yoritomo (copy) Minamoto no Yoritomo May 9, 1147—February 9, 1199) was the founder and the first shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate of Japan, who ruled from 1192 until 1199. ... This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ...

Contents

History

Heian period (794–1185)

Main article: Heian period

Originally, the title of Seii Taishogun was given to military commanders during the early Heian Period for the duration of military campaigns against the Emishi who resisted the governance of the Imperial court based in Kyoto. The most famous of these shogun was Sakanoue no Tamuramaro who conquered the Emishi in the name of Emperor Kammu. Eventually, the title was abandoned in the later Heian period after the Ainu had been either subjugated or driven to Hokkaidō. The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Heian Period. ... The name Emishi was used by the Japanese to designate those groups who opposed and resisted the rule of the Japanese Emperors during the late Nara and early Heian periods (7th–10th centuries A.D.), specifically those who lived in northeastern Japan corresponding to the present-day Tohoku region known... Kyoto )   is a city in the central part of the island of HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Sakanoue no Tamuramaro (坂上田村麻呂 758 - 811) was a general and shogun of the early Heian Period of Japan. ... The name Emishi was used by the Japanese to designate those groups who opposed and resisted the rule of the Japanese Emperors during the late Nara and early Heian periods (7th–10th centuries A.D.), specifically those who lived in northeastern Japan corresponding to the present-day Tohoku region known... Emperor Kanmu Emperor Kanmu ) (737–806) was the 50th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ...   literally North Sea Circuit, Ainu: Mosir), formerly known as Ezo, Yezo, Yeso, or Yesso, is the second largest island and largest prefecture of Japan. ...


In the later Heian, one more shogun was appointed. Minamoto no Yoshinaka was named sei-i taishōgun during the Gempei War only to be killed shortly thereafter by Minamoto no Yoshitsune. Minamoto no Yoshinaka )(1154-1184) was a general of the late Heian Period of Japanese history. ... The Genpei or Gempei War (源平戦争)(1180-1185) was a war of ancient Japan, fought between the Taira and Minamoto clans. ... Yoshitsune by Kikuchi Yosai Yoshitsune and Benkei Viewing Cherry Blossoms, by Yoshitoshi Tsukioka Minamoto no Yoshitsune () (1159 – June 15, 1189) was a general of the Minamoto clan of Japan in the late Heian and early Kamakura period. ...


Kamakura shogunate (1192–1333)

In the early 11th century, feudal estates headed by daimyo and protected by samurai came to dominate internal Japanese politics.[3] Two of the most powerful families, the Taira and Minamoto, fought for control over the declining imperial court. The Taira family seized control from 1160 to 1185, but was defeated by the Minamoto in a naval battle in the Inland Sea.[3] The Minamoto, claiming to serve and protect the emperor, set up headquarters in Kamakura and established the Kamakura shogunate in 1192 after Minamoto no Yoritomo was granted the title of shogun by the emperor.[3] This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Kamakura Period. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... Japanese samurai in armour, 1860s. ... Taira (平) is a Japanese surname. ... Seiryoji, a temple in Kyoto, was once a villa of Minamoto no Toru (d. ... Events Eric IX of Sweden is succeeded by Karl Sverkersson. ... Events April 25 - Genpei War - Naval battle of Dan-no-ura leads to Minamoto victory in Japan Templars settle in London and begin the building of New Temple Church End of the Heian Period and beginning of the Kamakura period in Japan. ... An inland sea is a shallow sea that covers central areas of continents during high stands of sea level that result in marine transgressions. ... Kamakura can refer to: Kamakura, Kanagawa, a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan The Kamakura Shogunate The Kamakura period in the History of Japan The Kamakura family name in Japan Kamakura Great Buddha, the Great Buddha of Kamakura Kamakura, a fictional character from the G.I. Joe series Category: ... This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... // Events The Third Crusade ends in disaster. ... Portrait of Yoritomo (copy) Minamoto no Yoritomo May 9, 1147—February 9, 1199) was the founder and the first shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate of Japan, who ruled from 1192 until 1199. ...


In the 1100s, the wars between the Minamoto and Taira families came to a conclusion with the defeat of the Taira clan in the Genpei War (1185). Minamoto no Yoritomo seized power from the emperor and established a feudal system of government based in Kamakura in which the military, the samurai, assumed political power while the Emperors of Japan and the aristocracy in Kyoto remained the figurehead de jure rulers. In 1192, Yoritomo was awarded the title of Sei-i Taishōgun by the emperor and the political system he developed with a succession of shogun at the head became known as a shogunate. The Kamakura shogunate lasted for almost 150 years, from 1192 to 1333. Minamoto (源) was an honorary surname bestowed by the Emperors of Japan of the Heian Period to their sons and grandsons after accepting them as royal subjects. ... Taira (平) is a Japanese surname. ... Taira (平) is a Japanese surname. ... The Genpei or Gempei War (源平合戦、寿永・治承の乱) (1180-1185) was a war of ancient Japan, fought between the Taira and Minamoto clans. ... Portrait of Yoritomo (copy) Minamoto no Yoritomo May 9, 1147—February 9, 1199) was the founder and the first shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate of Japan, who ruled from 1192 until 1199. ... Crowds of visitors in Kamakura (Tsurugaoka Hachiman Shrine) Kamakura (Japanese: 鎌倉市; -shi) is a city located in Kanagawa, Japan, about 50 km south-south-west of Tokyo (to which it is linked by the railway line to Yokosuka). ... Japanese samurai in armour, 1860s. ... For the CPR ocean liner, see Empress of Japan. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The term aristocracy refers to a form of government where power is hereditary, and split between a small number of families. ... Kyoto )   is a city in the central part of the island of HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The Kamakura relied largely on the Hōjō clan to act as regents, who became very influential within the shogunate.[4] The Hōjō clan (北条氏) in the history of Japan was a family of regents of the Kamakura Shogunate. ...


In 1274 and 1281, the Mongol Empire launched invasions against Japan. An attempt by Emperor Go-Daigo to restore imperial rule in 1331 was unsuccessful, but weakened the shogunate significantly and led to its eventual downfall.[4] Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Another picture of Mongol Empire The Mongol Empire (Mongolian: Их Монгол Улс, literally meaning Greater Mongol Nation; 1206–1405) was the largest contiguous land empire in history, covering over 33 million km² [1] (12 million square miles) at its peak, with an estimated population of over 100 million... Emperor Go-Daigo (後醍醐天皇 Go-Daigo Tennō) (November 26, 1288 – September 19, 1339) was the 96th Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Events September 8 - Stefan Dusan declares himself king of Serbia Start of the reign of Emperor Kogon of Japan, first of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Births Coluccio Salutati, Florentine political leader (died 1406) Deaths January 14 - Odoric, Italian explorer October 27 - Abulfeda, Arab historian and geographer (born 1273) Categories: 1331...


Kemmu restoration (1333–1336)

Main article: Kemmu restoration

The end of the Kamakura shogunate came when Kamakura fell in 1334 and the Hojo Regency was destroyed. Bakufu had ruled up through the 12th century. After this two families, Go-Saga the senior line, and Go-Daigo the junior line, had a claim to the throne. The problem was solved with the intercession of the the Kamakura Bakufu, who had the two lines alternate. This lasted until 1331 when the Go-Daigo line refused to alternate with the Go-Saga line. As a result the Go-Daigo was exiled. Around 1334-1336 Ashikaga Takauji helped the Go-Daigo line regain the throne.[5] The Kemmu Restoration (建武の新政; Kemmu no shinsei) was a period of Japanese history that occurred from 1333 to 1336 AD. It marks the three year period between the fall of the Kamakura shogunate and the rise of the Ashikaga shogunate, when Emperor Go-Daigo attempted to re-established Imperial control (but... Kamakura can refer to: Kamakura, Kanagawa, a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan The Kamakura Shogunate The Kamakura period in the History of Japan The Kamakura family name in Japan Kamakura Great Buddha, the Great Buddha of Kamakura Kamakura, a fictional character from the G.I. Joe series Category: ... Emperor Go-Saga (後嵯峨天皇) (April 1, 1220 - March 17, 1272) was the 88th imperial ruler of Japan. ... Emperor Go-Daigo (Japanese: 後醍醐天皇, Go-Daigo-tennō) (November 26, 1288–September 19, 1339) was the 96th Emperor of Japan. ... Kamakura can refer to: Kamakura, Kanagawa, a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan The Kamakura Shogunate The Kamakura period in the History of Japan The Kamakura family name in Japan Kamakura Great Buddha, the Great Buddha of Kamakura Kamakura, a fictional character from the G.I. Joe series Category: ... Ashikaga Takauji 1305—June 7, 1358) was the founder and first shogun of the Ashikaga shogunate. ...


The new Emperor found out that the fight against Bakufu left him with too many people claiming a limited supply of land. Ashikaga Takauji turned against the Emperor when the discontent about the distribution of land grew great enough. In 1336 the emperor was banished again, in favor of a new emperor.[5]


During the Kemmu Restoration, after the fall of the Kamakura shogunate in 1333, another short-lived shogun arose. Prince Moriyoshi (also known as Prince Morinaga), son of Emperor Go-Daigo, was awarded the title of Sei-i Taishōgun and put in charge of the military. However, Prince Moriyoshi was later put under house arrest and, in 1335, killed by Ashikaga Tadayoshi. Prince Morinaga or Moriyoshi (護良親王) (1308–1335; r. ... Emperor Go-Daigo (後醍醐天皇 Go-Daigo Tennō) (November 26, 1288 – September 19, 1339) was the 96th Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... ASHIKAGA Tadayoshi (1306-1352) was a general of the Northern and Southern Courts period (1337-92) of Japanese history and associate of his elder brother Ashikaga Takauji, the first Muromachi shogun. ...


Ashikaga shogunate (1336–1573)

The tomb of Ashikaga Takauji.
The tomb of Ashikaga Takauji.

In 1338 Ashikaga Takauji, like Yoritomo a descendant of the Minamoto princes, was awarded the title of sei-i taishōgun and established Ashikaga Shogunate, which lasted until 1573. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Ashikaga Takauji 1305—June 7, 1358) was the founder and first shogun of the Ashikaga shogunate. ... The Ashikaga shogunate (Jp. ... The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. ... Events Ashikaga Takauji granted title of Shogun by the emperor of Japan. ... Ashikaga Takauji 1305—June 7, 1358) was the founder and first shogun of the Ashikaga shogunate. ... The Ashikaga shogunate (Jp. ... Year 1573 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


Oda Nobunaga and the Toyotomi

Main articles: Sengoku period and Azuchi-Momoyama period

The two notably powerful sengoku daimyos, namely Oda Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi were never titled shoguns (sei-i taishōgun), in the strict meaning of the word. Although these two military adventurers did not succeed in establishing new dynasties of shoguns, they stood at a crucial moment in Japanese history. Their successes paved the way for the relative tranquility of the Tokugawa era. Even though westerners mistook them as shoguns, they were not actually shoguns at all. “Sengoku” redirects here. ... The Azuchi-Momoyama period (Japanese: 安土桃山時代, Azuchi-Momoyama-jidai) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1568 to 1600. ... The Sengoku Period (戦国時代 Sengoku jidai) or warring-states period, is a period of long civil war in the History of Japan that spans through the middle 15th to the early 17th centuries. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Toyotomi Hideyoshi (Shinjitai (modern Japanese) writing: ; KyÅ«jitai (historical) writing: 豐臣秀吉; born Hiyoshi-maru ; coming of age (Genpuku) as Kinoshita Tōkichirō and later made Hashiba and martial nobility in the style of Hashiba Chikuzen no Kami Hideyoshi ;February 2, 1536 or March 26, 1537 – September 18, 1598), was a Sengoku...


Nobunaga was offered the title but he died before accepting the title.[6][7] Hideyoshi was named kampaku which was the highest rank nominated by the Imperial family.[8] It had previously been given only to members of Fujiwara clan or its descendants. The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... The Fujiwara clan (藤原氏 Fujiwara-shi) was a clan of regents who had sort of monopoly to the Sekkan positions, Sesshō and Kampaku. ...


Tokugawa shogunate (1603–1868)

Main articles: Tokugawa shogunate and Edo period

Subsequently, Tokugawa Ieyasu seized power and established a government at Edo (now known as Tokyo) in 1600. He received the title sei-i taishōgun in 1603. The Tokugawa shogunate lasted until 1868, after Tokugawa Yoshinobu resigned as shogun and abdicated his authority to Emperor Meiji in 1867.[1] Download high resolution version (640x667, 94 KB)Tokugawa Ieyasu Source: [1], copyright expired due to age of image. ... Download high resolution version (640x667, 94 KB)Tokugawa Ieyasu Source: [1], copyright expired due to age of image. ... Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu The Tokugawa clan crest This is a Japanese name; the family name is Tokugawa Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu) January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Edo Period. ... Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu The Tokugawa clan crest This is a Japanese name; the family name is Tokugawa Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu) January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until... Edo (Japanese: , literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... Tokugawa Yoshinobu in French military uniform, c. ... Emperor Meiji ) (November 3, 1852 — July 30, 1912) was the 122nd emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from February 3, 1867 until his death. ...


During the Edo period effective power rested with the Tokugawa shoguns, not the emperor in Kyoto, even though the former ostensibly owed his position to the latter. The shogun controlled foreign policy, the military, and feudal patronage. Contemporary writers referred to the imperial dynasty as a shōkoku (defunct dynasty). The role of the emperor was ceremonial at best, similar to the position of the Japanese monarchy after the Second World War.[9] Kyoto )   is a city in the central part of the island of HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


The title sei-i taishōgun was abolished during the Meiji Restoration in 1868, in which effective power was "restored" to the emperor and his appointees. See Late Tokugawa shogunate. However, it is a little known fact that during the Boshin War, Date Yoshikuni, the lord of Sendai han, received the title from Kitashirakawa Yoshihisa, the Imperial prince who had declared himself Emperor Tōbu (Tōbu-tennō; 東武天皇).[10] The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ... The Late Tokugawa Shogunate (Japanese: Bakumatsu) is the period between 1853 and 1867 during which Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy called sakoku and modernized from a feudal shogunate to the Meiji government. ... Combatants Imperial faction: Satsuma, ChōshÅ«, Tosa Tokugawa Shogunate Commanders Ruler: Meiji Emperor, CIC: Saigō Takamori, Army: Kuroda Kiyotaka Shogunate: Ruler: Tokugawa Yoshinobu, Army: Katsu Kaishu, Navy: Enomoto Takeaki, Ezo Republic: President:Enomoto Takeaki, CIC: Otori Keisuke, Navy: Arai Ikunosuke Casualties ~1,000 killed ~2,000 killed Campaign map of... Date Yoshikuni (伊達慶邦, October 17, 1825-July 12, 1874) Japanese daimyo lord of the late Edo period. ... Sendai ) was a Japanese domain of the Edo period covering much of modern-day Miyagi Prefecture. ... His Imperial Highness Prince Kitashirakawa Yoshihisa , 1 April 1847 - 5 November 1895) of Japan, was the 2nd head of a collateral branch of the Japanese imperial family. ...


Shogunate

The term bakufu originally meant the dwelling and household of a shogun, but in time it came to be generally used for the system of government of a feudal military dictatorship, exercised by the shogun, and this is the meaning that has been adopted into English through the term "shogunate." Dictator is originally the title of a magistrate in ancient Rome appointed by the Senate to rule the state in times of emergency. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


The bakufu system was originally established under the Kamakura shogunate by Minamoto no Yoritomo. Although theoretically the state, and therefore the Emperor, held ownership of all land of Japan, the system had some feudal elements, with lesser territorial lords pledging their allegiance to greater ones. Samurai were rewarded for their loyalty with land, which was in turn, on the liege lord's permission, handed down and divided among their sons. The hierarchy that held this system of government together was reinforced by close ties of loyalty between samurai and their subordinates. This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... Portrait of Yoritomo (copy) Minamoto no Yoritomo May 9, 1147—February 9, 1199) was the founder and the first shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate of Japan, who ruled from 1192 until 1199. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... Japanese samurai in armour, 1860s. ...

This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Kamakura Period. ... The Ashikaga shogunate (Jp. ... The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Edo Period. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d "Shogun" (1992), pp. 432-433
  2. ^ Totman (1966), p. 102
  3. ^ a b c "Japan" (1992), pp. 34-59
  4. ^ a b Columbia University (2000)
  5. ^ a b Sansom (1961), p. 442
  6. ^ William Scott Morton, J. Kenneth Olenik. Japan: Its History and Culture. Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  7. ^ June Kinoshita, Nicholas Palevsky. Gateway to Japan. Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  8. ^ Dorothy Perkins. Samurai of Japan: A Chronology From Their Origin in the Heian Era (794-1185) to the Modern Era. Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  9. ^ Wakabayashi (1991), pp. 27-29
  10. ^ Sinsengumi (2003)

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ...

References

  • Columbia University (2000). Japan: History: Early History to the Ashikaga Shoguns. Factmonster. Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  • Brazell, Karen (November 1972). "The Changing of the Shogun 1289: An Excerpt from Towazugatari". The Journal of the Association of Teachers of Japanese 8 (1): 58-65. 
  • Brock, Karen L. (Winter 1995). "The Shogun's 'Painting Match'". Monumenta Nipponica 50 (4): 433-484. 
  • Grossberg, Kenneth A. (August 1976). "Bakufu Bugyonin: The Size of the Lower Bureaucracy in Muromachi Japan". The Journal of Asian Studies 35 (4): 651-654. 
  • Grossberg, Kenneth A. (Spring 1976). "From Feudal Chieftain to Secular Monarch. The Development of Shogunal Power in Early Muromachi Japan". Monumenta Nipponica 31 (1): 29-49. 
  • "Japan". The World Book Encyclopedia: 34-59. (1992). World Book. ISBN 0-7166-0092-7. 
  • McCune, George M. (May 1946). "The Exchange of Envoys between Korea and Japan During the Tokugawa Period". The Far Eastern Quarterly 5 (3): 308-325. 
  • Ravina, Mark (November 1995). "State-Building and Political Economy in Early-modern Japan". The Journal of Asian Studies 54 (4): 997-1022. 
  • Seigle, Cecilia Segawa (December 1999). "The Shogun's Consort: Konoe Hiroko and Tokugawa Ienobu". Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 59 (2): 485-522. 
  • Hurst, C. Cameron, III (November 1981). "Review of Learning from Shogun: Japanese History and Western Fantasy, by Henry Smith". The Journal of Asian Studies 41 (1): 158-159. 
  • Sansom, George (1961). A History of Japan, 1134-1615. United States: Stanford University Press. 
  • "Shogun". The World Book Encyclopedia: 432-433. (1992). World Book. ISBN 0-7166-0092-7. 
  • Sinsengumi, Bakumatuisin (2003). 仙台藩主 (Japanese). Bakusin. Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  • Smith, Henry (ed.) (1980). Learning from Shogun: Japanese History and Western Fantasy. Santa Barbara: University of California Program in Asian Studies. 
  • Totman, Conrad (1966). "Political Succession in The Tokugawa Bakufu: Abe Masahiro's Rise to Power, 1843-1845". Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 26: 102-124. 
  • Wakabayashi, Bob Tadashi (Winter 1991). "In Name Only: Imperial Sovereignty in Early Modern Japan". Journal of Japanese Studies 17 (1): 25-57. 

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Shogun | BoardGameGeek (432 words)
Shogun is based on the Wallenstein game system.
The game is set in the Sengoku period (approx 1467-1573) which ends with the inception of the well-known Tokugawa Shogunate.
The game is an international edition with language-independent components and five language-dependent rule booklets.
Shogun Kunitoki (917 words)
Shogun Kunitoki has been in existence since the late 1990s, but it wasn't until around 2003 that they discovered their own voice.
The C64s had to be replaced with something, and this lead to a period of fermentation during which Shogun Kunitoki moved away from computer-based music, and was eventually reborn as a real band with live instrumentation and a new, organic sound.
Shogun Kunitoki's debut album, Tasankokaiku, released by Fonal in early 2006, stands as a culmination of the group's long search for their own musical language.
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