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Encyclopedia > Shoeless Joe Jackson
Shoeless Joe Jackson
Outfield
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 25, 1908 for the Philadelphia Athletics
Final game
September 27, 1920 for the Chicago White Sox
Career statistics
Batting Average     .356
Home Runs     54
Runs Batted In     785
Teams

Philadelphia Athletics (1908 - 1909)
Cleveland Naps (1910 - 1915)
Chicago White Sox (1915 - 1920)
Shoeless Joe Jackson (pre-1920 photo) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The outfield is a sporting term used in cricket and baseball to refer to the area of the field of play further from the batsman or batter than the infield. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... See also: 1907 in sports, other events of 1908, 1909 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball The Chicago Cubs defeat the Detroit Tigers, four games to one, in the World Series. ... There have been three professional baseball teams based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania known as the Philadelphia Athletics: 1. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1919 in sports, other events of 1920, 1921 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball (Major League) January 3 - Boston Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sells Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees for $125,000 and a $350,000 loan, beginning the Curse of... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) White Stockings (1900-1903) St. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... There have been three professional baseball teams based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania known as the Philadelphia Athletics: 1. ... See also: 1907 in sports, other events of 1908, 1909 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball The Chicago Cubs defeat the Detroit Tigers, four games to one, in the World Series. ... See also: 1908 in sports, 1910 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball The Pittsburgh Pirates defeat the Detroit Tigers, four games to three, in the World Series. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present) Cleveland Stadium (1932-1993)* a. ... See also: 1909 in sports, 1911 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Collingwood wins the 14th VFL Premiership (Collingwood 9. ... See also: 1914 in sports, 1916 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Carlton wins the 19th VFL Premiership (Carlton 11. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) White Stockings (1900-1903) St. ... See also: 1914 in sports, 1916 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Carlton wins the 19th VFL Premiership (Carlton 11. ... See also: 1919 in sports, other events of 1920, 1921 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball (Major League) January 3 - Boston Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sells Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees for $125,000 and a $350,000 loan, beginning the Curse of...

Career highlights and awards
  • 3rd Highest Career Batting Average
  • Hit .408 in 1911

Joseph Jefferson "Shoeless Joe" Jackson (July 16, 1888December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. One of the greatest hitters of his era, he was one of eight players made permanently ineligible for Major League Baseball for his alleged participation in the Black Sox scandal. No player banned from baseball, including Jackson, has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, and once Pete Rose was placed on the permanently ineligible list, the Hall of Fame changed its bylaws to prohibit induction of banned players. See also: 1910 in sports, 1912 in sports and the list of years in sports. Auto Racing January 21 - The first Monte Carlo motor rally May 30 - At the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the first Indianapolis 500 ends with Ray Harroun becoming the first winner of the 500-mile auto race. ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The position of the left fielder A left fielder, abbreviated LF, is an outfielder in the sport of baseball who plays defense in left field. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Ballpark McAfee Coliseum (1968–present) a. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present) Cleveland Stadium (1932-1993)* a. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) White Stockings (1900-1903) St. ... 1919 Chicago White Sox team photo The Black Sox Scandal refers to a number of events that took place around and during the play of the 1919 World Series. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Born in Pickens County, South Carolina, Jackson came from a poor family living in a mill town, and he was unschooled as a child, remaining illiterate well into middle age. He is considered to be one of the most outstanding hitters in the history of the game, to the point that Babe Ruth claimed that he modeled his hitting technique after Jackson's. Jackson is the only rookie to have batted over .400; he hit .408 for Cleveland in 1911 (although he would not be considered a rookie by today's definition). His career .356 batting average is the third highest in history, after Ty Cobb and Rogers Hornsby. Pickens County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... For the band, see Babe Ruth (band). ... The Rookie: Norman Rockwells cover for The Saturday Evening Post Rookie is a term for a person who is in their first year of play of their sport and has little or no experience. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach,[2] was a Major League Baseball (MLB) player. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ...


Nickname

Ty Cobb and Joe Jackson in Cleveland, 1913

He obtained the nickname "Shoeless" when he played the second game of a doubleheader against the Anderson (South Carolina) Electricians in 1908. Joe had bought a pair of new spikes and wore them the first game of the doubleheader, and they caused blisters on his feet. Joe wanted to sit out the second game of the doubleheader, but they didn't have enough players that day, so Joe had to play. He played the first inning in the new shoes, but they hurt his feet badly, so he took them off and played the rest of the game in his stockinged feet. During the 7th inning of that game, Joe hit a triple; as he was sliding into third base, on the Anderson side of the stands, one of the Anderson fans stood up and hollered "You shoeless son of a bitch." There was a cub reporter for the Greenville News present that day, who heard the comment and wrote the next day about "Shoeless" Joe Jackson. Joe only played one game in his stockinged feet, but the nickname lives on. Joe did not care for the nickname, but it is how the world knew him and continues to know him. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (452x640, 55 KB) Summary http://memory. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (452x640, 55 KB) Summary http://memory. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach,[2] was a Major League Baseball (MLB) player. ... Anderson is a city located in Anderson County, South Carolina. ...


The nickname was used for the character of "Shoeless Joe" Hardy in the Broadway show Damn Yankees, and as the basis of a song in the musical ("Shoeless Joe from Hannibal, MO"). Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Damn Yankees is a musical comedy, a modern retelling of the Faust legend set during the 1950s (when the New York Yankees dominated Major League Baseball), in Washington, D.C., with a script by George Abbott and Douglass Wallop and music and lyrics by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross. ...


Black Sox scandal

Main article: Black Sox Scandal

After the White Sox unexpectedly lost the 1919 World Series to the Cincinnati Reds, eight players, including Jackson, were accused of "throwing" games. In September 1920, a grand jury was convened to investigate. Jackson admitted under oath that he participated in the fix, and accepted $5,000 as part-payment for his cooperation (a sum he claimed to have attempted to return twice). He also admitted to complaining to other conspirators that he had not received his full share. The then-current owner of the Sox, Charles Comiskey, encouraged Jackson to admit these things. A jury, however, acquitted him of criminal charges related to the scandal, although the trial itself has been the subject of controversy, with key evidence purportedly having gone missing from the prosecutor's office shortly before the trial.[citation needed] Jackson was found guilty of not reporting the scandal. 1919 Chicago White Sox team photo The Black Sox Scandal refers to a number of events that took place around and during the play of the 1919 World Series. ... The 1919 World Series was played between the Chicago White Sox of the American League and the Cincinnati Reds of the National League. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 14, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... A grand jury is a type of jury, in the common law legal system, which determines if there is enough evidence for a trial. ... Match fixing or game fixing in organized sports occurs when a match is played to a completely or partially pre-determined result. ... Charles Comiskey baseball card, 1887 Charles Albert Comiskey (August 15, 1859 - October 26, 1931) was a Major League Baseball player, manager and team owner. ...


Jackson always publicly maintained his innocence and insisted until his death that he was playing his best in the Series. He asserted that he had a .375 batting average, threw out five baserunners, and handled thirty chances in the outfield with no errors during that series. The evidence, however, is that he threw out only one baserunner, an assist to homeplate after catching a fly ball in the 6th game and that the misperception about five assists began when Jackson claimed in a 1949 interview with Sport magazine that "I threw out five men at home and could have had three others, if bad cutoffs hadn't been made." He also batted far worse in the five games that the White Sox lost, totalling only one RBI, from a home run in game 8 once the game was 5-0 for the Reds. The Cincinnati Reds also hit an unusually high number of triples to left field during the series, far exceeding the amount that Jackson—generally considered a strong defensive player—normally allowed.[1] Arguably, this could be seen as Jackson attempting to fix the games through inaction, although another possible explanation could be simple game-to-game ups and downs in performance, typical of even the most elite baseball players. In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 14, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront...


One play in particular has been subjected to much scrutiny. In the fifth inning of game 4, with a Cincinnati player on second, Jackson fielded a single hit to left field and threw home. Eyewitness accounts say that the throw would have resulted in an out had pitcher Eddie Cicotte, one of the leaders of the fix, not interfered.[citation needed] The run scored and the White Sox lost the game 2-0. James C. Hamilton—the official scorer of the 1919 World Series—testified under oath in a later civil trial between Jackson and Charles Comiskey that the throw was honest and that Cicotte jumped up and knocked it down for an error.[citation needed] Chick Gandil, another leader of the fix, admitted to yelling at Cicotte to intercept the throw in his autobiography.[citation needed] Edward Victor Cicotte (June 19, 1884 - May 5, 1969 Born and Died in Detroit, Michigan) (pronounced See-Cot) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball best known for his time with the Chicago White Sox. ... The 1919 World Series was played between the Chicago White Sox of the American League and the Cincinnati Reds of the National League. ... Charles Comiskey baseball card, 1887 Charles Albert Comiskey (August 15, 1859 - October 26, 1931) was a Major League Baseball player, manager and team owner. ... Arnold Chick Gandil (19 January 1887 _ 13 December 1970) was an American baseball player. ...


Aftermath

Joe Jackson and his wife are buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in Greenville, SC, where many visitors still leave baseballs and shoes, 2007

After being banned from the majors, Jackson played extensively in semipro leagues in Georgia and South Carolina. In 1929, he and his wife, Katherine, moved to Greenville, South Carolina. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2048 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2048 pixel, file size: 2. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other places with the same name, see Greenville. ...


In the 1940s, according to a story by Harvey Frommer, he was working at his liquor store when former adversary Ty Cobb and sportswriter Grantland Rice entered as customers. Following an impersonal transaction, Cobb asked, "Don't you know me, Joe?" "Sure, I know you," replied Jackson, "but I wasn't sure you wanted to know me. A lot of them don't." [1] This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach,[2] was a Major League Baseball (MLB) player. ... Grantland Rice (November 1, 1880–July 13, 1954) was an early 20th century American sportswriter. ...


Joe Jackson suffered from heart trouble in his later years and died in Greenville in 1951 at the age of 63. He is buried in Woodlawn Memorial Park there. Jackson's last words before his death were reportedly "I'm about to face the greatest umpire of all and He knows I am


Career statistics

see: Baseball statistics for an explanation of these statistics. Statistics are very important to baseball, perhaps more than any other sport. ...

Career Hitting[2]
G AB H 2B 3B HR R RBI SB BB SO AVG OBP SLG OPS
1,332 4,981 1,772 307 168 54 873 785 202 519 158 .356 .423 .517 .940

His .356 batting average is the third-highest career batting average behind only Ty Cobb and Rogers Hornsby. His 1911 batting average of .408 is the sixth highest for a season in the twentieth century. In baseball statistics, games played (denoted by G) indicates the total number of games in which a player has participated (in any capacity). ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ... In baseball statistics, a hit (denoted by H), sometimes called a base hit, is credited to a batter when he safely reaches first base after batting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base by striking the ball and getting to third before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances safely around all three bases and returns safely to home plate. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... In baseball statistics, a base on balls (BB), also called a walk, is credited to a batter and against a pitcher when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls. ... Cincinnati Reds outfielder Adam Dunn strikes out swinging to Atlanta Braves pitcher John Smoltz (not pictured). ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... In baseball statistics, on-base plus slugging (denoted by OPS) incorporates on base percentage (OBP) and slugging percentage (SLG). ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach,[2] was a Major League Baseball (MLB) player. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Despite being banned from baseball at what should have been roughly the two-thirds mark of his career, and being excluded from election to the Hall of Fame, in 1999, he ranked Number 35 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ...


Books

  • "Shoeless: The Life And Times of Joe Jackson", by David L. Fleitz (2001, McFarland & Company Publishers)
  • Shoeless Joe, a novel by W. P. Kinsella
  • Eight Men Out, by Eliot Asinof, an account of the 1919 World Series fix
  • Joe Jackson: A Biography, by Kelly Boyer Sagert
  • Say It Ain't So, Joe!: The True Story of Shoeless Joe Jackson, by Donald Gropman, also includes the Ted Williams and Bob Feller Petition to admit Jackson into the Baseball Hall of Fame
  • A Man Called Shoeless, by Howard Burman
  • "Burying the Black Sox" (Potomac, Spring 2006) by Gene Carney.
  • "Shoeless Joe & Me" (HarperCollins, 2002) by Dan Gutman

Shoeless Joe is a fantasy novel by W. P. Kinsella. ... William Patrick Kinsella, OC (born May 25, 1935, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) is a noted novelist who mainly writes about Canadas First Nations and baseball. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who played 19 seasons, twice interrupted by military service as a Marine Corps pilot, with the... Robert William Andrew Feller, nicknamed the The guy who wont sign his great nephews baseballs from Van Meter and Rapid Robert, is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher and Hall of Famer. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related...

Songs

  • Say it ain't so, Joe, by Murray Head, 1975 From the Album Say it ain't so
  • Kenesaw Mountain Landis, by Jonathan Coulton, from the album Smoking Monkey

Murray Head on the cover of his album Passion. ... Jonathan Coulton is a folk rock singer-songwriter. ...

Films

Eight Men Out is an American dramatic sports film, released in 1988, based on 8 Men Out, published in 1963, by Eliot Asinof. ... Photo of John Sayles by Robert Birnbaum John Thomas Sayles (born September 28, 1950) is an independent American film director and writer who frequently takes a small part in his own and other indie films. ... Daniel Bernard Sweeney (born 14 November 1961 in Shoreham, New York) is an American movie and television actor. ... Baseball field from the movie. ... Ray Liotta (born Raymond Julian Vicimarli on December 18, 1954) is an American actor. ...

References

  1. ^ Cobb Jackson story
  2. ^ Baseball-Reference.com.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Baseball-Reference.com - career statistics and analysis
  • blackbetsy.com Shoeless Joe Jackson's Virtual Hall of Fame
  • findagrave.com Shoeless Joe Jackson at Find-A-Grave
  • hallyes.com Petition asking Bud Selig to reinstate Shoeless Joe
  • shoelessjoejackson.com The Official Web Site
  • See the letter written by Commissioner Landis banning Shoeless Joe Jackson from baseball

  Results from FactBites:
 
Shoeless Joe Jackson Quotes (412 words)
"(Shoeless Joe) Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball.
Shoeless Joe Jackson was an illiterate mill worker when he came to Cleveland in 1911.
Shoeless Joe Jackson was banned from baseball by Judge Landis and the fight to have him reinstated still rages on — even in our hall of fame forum on Baseball Fever.
Shoeless Joe Jackson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1033 words)
Jackson is the only rookie to have batted over.400; he hit.408 for Cleveland in 1911 (although he would not be considered a rookie by today's definition).
Jackson always publicly maintained his innocence and insisted that he was playing his best in the 1919 World Series until his death.
Joe Jackson suffered from heart trouble in his later years and died in Greenville in 1951.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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