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Encyclopedia > Shirley Temple
Shirley Temple
Born Shirley Jane Temple
April 23, 1928 (1928-04-23) (age 79)
Santa Monica, California
Other name(s) Shirley Temple Black
Years active 1932–1961
Spouse(s) John Agar (1945–1950, divorced, 1 child)
Charles Alden Black (1950–2005, his death, 2 children)
Official website

Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928) is an Academy Award-winning actress most famous for being an iconic American child actor of the 1930s, who enjoyed a notable career as a diplomat as an adult. After rising to fame at the age of six with her breakthrough performance in Bright Eyes in 1934, she starred in a series of highly successful films which won her widespread public adulation and saw her become the top grossing star at the American box-office during the height of the Depression. She went on to star in films as a young adult in the 1940s. In later life, she became a United States ambassador and diplomat. A Shirley Temple is a non-alcoholic cocktail (or mocktail) made with Ginger ale, grenadine syrup, and orange juice garnished with a maraschino cherry and slice of lemon[1]. The Ginger ale is commonly substituted with 7 Up, Sprite, or similar lemon-lime soft drink, and the orange juice is... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... John G. Agar (January 31, 1921 - April 7, 2002) was a successful Hollywood actor who ascended to celebrity shortly after World War II. He is perhaps best remembered for as Shirley Temples first husband (1945-1950) and for starring in the Sands of Iwo Jima alongside John Wayne; however... Charles Black was a California businessman, who was born on March 6, 1919 in Oakland,California. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... This award is officially called the Honorary Juvenile Award. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Bright Eyes is a 1934 musical film, starring Shirley Temple and produced by 20th Century Fox (then called Fox Pictures). David Butler directed and co-wrote the movie. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ...

Contents

Movie career

Main article: Shirley Temple filmography, features and short subjects

Temple's popularity earned her both public adulation and the approval of peers. At the age of five, the hallmark of her acting work was her professionalism: she always had her lines memorized and dance steps prepared when shooting began.


In her earliest films she danced and was able to handle complex tap choreography. She was teamed with famed dancer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in The Little Colonel, The Littlest Rebel, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, and Just Around the Corner. Robinson coached and developed her choreography for many of her other films. Because Robinson was African-American, his scenes holding hands with Temple were edited out in many cities in the South, due to segregationism. Shirley Temple once tap danced all the way down a staircase singing a line of her song on every single one of the 45 steps. Bill Bojangles Robinson (May 25, 1878 – November 25, 1949) was a pioneer and pre-eminent African-American tap dance performer. ... the little colonel was a movie by shirley with costar Bill bojangles Robinson ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm is a 1938 film directed by Allan Dwan, based upon the childrens book Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm by Kate Douglas Wiggin. ... Just Around the Corner is a 1938 movie musical starring Shirley Temple, Joan Davis, Charles Farrell, Bill Bojangles Robinson, Bert Lahr, and Franklin Pangborn. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Segregation means separation. ...


Temple made pictures with Carole Lombard, Gary Cooper, Adolphe Menjou, and many others. Arthur Treacher appeared as a kindly butler in several of Temple's films. Carole Lombard (October 6, 1908 – January 16, 1942) was an American actress. ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ... Adolphe Menjou Adolphe Jean Menjou (February 18, 1890 – October 29, 1963) was an American actor of French and Irish descent. ... Arthur Treachers Fish and Chips is a fast food seafood restaurant chain with, as of 2003, 177 stores which serve fish and chips. ... For other uses, see Butler (disambiguation). ...


At the age of three Temple began dance classes at Meglin's Dance School in Los Angeles California. Her film career began when Charles Lamont, a casting director from Educational Pictures, visited her class. Although Temple hid behind a piano in the studio, she was chosen by Lamont, invited to audition, and eventually signed to a contract with Educational. The Meglin Kiddies was a prestigious performance troupe. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Charles Lamont was a prolific film director of over 200 titles, and the producer and writer of many others. ... Educational Pictures (or Educational Film Exchanges, Inc. ...


Temple worked at Educational from 1931 to 1934,[1] [1] and appeared in two series of short subjects for the studio. Her first series, Baby Burlesks, satirized recent motion pictures and politics. In the series, Temple would dress up in a diaper, but would otherwise wear adult clothes. Because of its depiction of young children in adult situations the series was considered controversial by some viewers. Her second series at Educational, Frolics of Youth, was a bit more acceptable, and cast her as a bratty younger sister in a contemporary suburban family. Baby Burlesks was a series of short films produced by Educational Pictures in the early 1930s. ... Baby cloth diaper filled with extra cloth. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ...


While working for Educational Pictures, Temple performed many walk-on and bit player roles in various films at other studios. She was reported to have auditioned for a lead role in Hal Roach's Our Gang comedies (later known as The Little Rascals) in the early 1930s, although various reasons are given for her not having been cast in the role. Roach stated that Temple and her mother were unable to make it through the red tape of the audition process, while Our Gang producer/director Robert F. McGowan recalls the studio wanted to cast Temple, but they refused to give in to Temple's mother's demands that Temple receive special star billing. Temple, in her autobiography Child Star, denies auditioning for Our Gang at all.[2] Harold Eugene Roach, Sr. ... A poster for the 1931 Our Gang comedy Love Business featuring depictions of (from left to right): Pete the Pup, Jackie Cooper, and Norman Chubby Chaney. ... The name The Little Rascals refers primarily to the television package of producer Hal Roachs Our Gang theatrical short film comedies, specifically those made between 1929 and 1938. ... Robert Francis McGowan (July 11, 1882 - January 27, 1955) was an American film director and producer, best known as the senior director of the Our Gang short subjects film series from 1922 until 1933. ...


20th Century Fox

Shirley Temple was finally signed to Fox Film Corporation (which later merged with 20th Century Pictures to become 20th Century Fox) in late 1933, after appearing in Stand Up and Cheer! with James Dunn. Later, she was paired with Dunn in several films, notably her breakthrough blockbuster Bright Eyes, produced by Sol M. Wurtzel. This was the film that saved Fox from near bankruptcy in 1934 at the height of the Great Depression. It was in Bright Eyes that Temple first performed the song that would become one of her trademarks, "On the Good Ship Lollipop". This was closely followed by the film Curly Top, in which she first sang another trademarked song, "Animal Crackers in My Soup". In 1936, Temple was paid an unprecedented amount of money for her work on Poor Little Rich Girl: $15,000 per week. It was during this period, in the depth of the Depression, when her films were seen as bringing hope and optimism, that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt is reported to have proclaimed that "as long as our country has Shirley Temple, we will be all right."[3] The Fox Film Corporation was an American company which produced motion pictures, formed in 1915 when founder William Fox merged two companies he had established in 1913: Greater New York Film Rental, a distribution firm, which was part of the Independents; and Fox (or Box, depending on the source) Office... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Stand Up and Cheer! is a 1934 motion picture about the Depression Era in the United States, and the efforts undertaken to boost the morale of the citizenry. ... Bright Eyes is a 1934 musical film, starring Shirley Temple and produced by 20th Century Fox (then called Fox Pictures). David Butler directed and co-wrote the movie. ... Sol M. Wurtzel (September 12, 1881 - April 9, 1958) was an American motion picture producer. ... This article is about the animal. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... On the Good Ship Lollipop was the trademark song of child actress Shirley Temple. ... Curly Top was a 1935 musical starring Shirley Temple, Rochelle Hudson, Jane Darwell, and John Boles. ... Animal Cracker in My Soup was sung by Shirley Temple in the 1935 film Curly Top. The lyrics were written by Irving Caesar and Ted Koehler and the music by Ray Henderson. ... Poor Little Rich Girl is a 1965 Andy Warhol film starring Edie Sedgwick. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ...


In sixteen of the thirty films Temple made for Fox, she played characters with at least one dead parent. This was part of the formula for her films, which encouraged the adults in the audience to take on the role of her parent.[4]


While at Fox, Temple became the studio's most lucrative player. Her contract was amended several times between 1933 and 1935, and she was loaned to Paramount for a pair of successful films in 1934. For four years, she was the top-grossing box-office star in America. Shirley's birth certificate was altered to prolong her babyhood; her birth year was advanced from 1928 to 1929. She was not told her real age until her "twelfth" (actually her thirteenth) birthday.[5]


In 1940, Temple left Fox. Working steadily, she juggled classes at Westlake School for Girls with films for various other studios, including MGM and Paramount. Her most successful pictures of the time included Since You Went Away with Claudette Colbert, The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer with Cary Grant, and Fort Apache with John Wayne. She retired from motion pictures in 1949. About Harvard-Westlake School is one of the top college preparatory institutions in Los Angeles, California. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Look up Paramount on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Paramount can refer to: Paramount, California, a city in Los Angeles County Paramount Pictures, a motion picture company Paramount Records, a record label United Paramount Network (UPN), a television network in the United States, owned by Viacom Inc. ... Since You Went Away is a 1944 film which tells the story of how a woman copes at home while her husband has gone off to fight World War II. It stars Claudette Colbert, Jennifer Jones, Shirley Temple, Joseph Cotten, Monty Woolley, Robert Walker, Lionel Barrymore, Hattie McDaniel, Agnes Moorehead... Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 – July 30, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning French-born American actress. ... www. ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... Fort Apache is a 1948 western film starring John Wayne and Henry Fonda and directed by John Ford. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ...


Film career highlights

Shirley Temple with the Prime Minister of Canada William Lyon Mackenzie King - photo taken on October 21, 1944
Shirley Temple with the Prime Minister of Canada William Lyon Mackenzie King - photo taken on October 21, 1944

Temple was the first recipient of the special Juvenile Performer Academy Award in 1935 for recognition of her outstanding contribution to screen entertainment in 1934. Temple was the youngest performer ever to receive this honor, or any Oscar until 1974, when 10 year old Tatum O'Neal won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in Paper Moon. She is also the youngest actress to add foot and hand prints to the forecourt at Grauman's Chinese Theatre. Image File history File links ShirleyTempleMackenzieKing2. ... Image File history File links ShirleyTempleMackenzieKing2. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This award is officially called the Honorary Juvenile Award. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Tatum Beatrice ONeal (born November 5, 1963 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-winning American actress best known for her film work as a child actress in the 1970s. ... Best Supporting Actor or Best Supporting Actress is an accolade given by a group of film or theatre professionals in recognition of the work of supporting and character actors. ... Paper Moon is an American motion picture comedy that was released in 1973 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The role of Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz was originally meant for Judy Garland. However, MGM executives were concerned with Garland's box office appeal. Temple was considered for the role, although she was unable to appear in the film when a trade between Fox and MGM fell through. However, Terry, who played Temple's beloved dog Rags in Bright Eyes, was cast in The Wizard of Oz as Toto. In 1940 Temple starred in The Blue Bird, another fairy story with plot similarities to The Wizard of Oz. It was her first box-office flop. Temple was also rumored to be the inspiration for Bonnie Blue Butler in Gone with the Wind and was one of the early contenders for the role in the motion picture, but was too old by the time the film went into production. The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Terry (1933-1944) was a Cairn Terrier whose most famous role was Toto (dog) in the movie The Wizard of Oz. ... Terry, the Cairn Terrier who played Toto in the film Toto is the name of a fictional dog in L. Frank Baums Oz series of childrens books, and works derived from them. ... The Blue Bird is a 1940 film starring Shirley Temple. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ...


Temple appeared in her first Technicolor film, The Little Princess, produced by Fox in 1939, near the end of her contract with them. Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... For the Mary Pickford film see The Little Princess (1917 film); for the remake starring Liesel Matthews see A Little Princess (1995 film) The Little Princess (1939) is a film directed by Walter Lang based upon the novel, A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett. ...


Product line

There were many Shirley Temple products manufactured and released during the 1930s. Ideal's Temple dolls, first made in 1934, dressed in costumes from the movies, were top sellers.[6] Original Shirley Temple dolls bring in hundreds of dollars on the secondary market today. Other successful Temple items included a line of girls' dresses, hairbows, bracelets and handkerchiefs. A popular breakfast set, consisting of a mug, pitcher and cereal bowl in cobalt blue and featuring a decal of Temple, was given away as a premium with Wheaties and Bisquick.[6] Several of Temple's film songs, including "On the Good Ship Lollipop"(from Bright Eyes), "Animal Crackers in My Soup" (from Curly Top) and "Goodnight My Love" (from Stowaway) were popular radio hits. She frequently lent her likeness and talent to promoting various social causes, including the Red Cross. Ideal Toy Company was founded as Ideal Novelty and Toy Company in New York in 1907 by Morris and Rose Michtom after they had invented the teddy bear in 1903. ... On the Good Ship Lollipop was the trademark song of child actress Shirley Temple. ... Bright Eyes is a 1934 musical film, starring Shirley Temple and produced by 20th Century Fox (then called Fox Pictures). David Butler directed and co-wrote the movie. ... Animal Cracker in My Soup was sung by Shirley Temple in the 1935 film Curly Top. The lyrics were written by Irving Caesar and Ted Koehler and the music by Ray Henderson. ... Curly Top was a 1935 musical starring Shirley Temple, Rochelle Hudson, Jane Darwell, and John Boles. ... Goodnight My Love can refer to: Goodnight My Love, a 1932 song by Gus Arnheim, Harry Tobias, and Jules Lemare Goodnight My Love, a 1936 song by Mack Gordon and Harry Revel Goodnight My Love, a 1956 song by G. Motola and J. Marascalco Category: ... The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Hollywood return

In the 1950s and 1960s, she made a brief return to show business with two television series. Shirley Temple's Storybook premiered on NBC on January 12, 1958 and last aired December 1, 1959. Shirley Temple Theatre (also known as The Shirley Temple Show) premiered on NBC on September 11, 1960 and last aired September 10, 1961. Both shows featured adaptations of fairy tales and other family oriented stories. Shirley Temple was the hostess and occasional narrator/actress in both series. In 1958-61, Shirley Temple made a brief return to show business with two television series. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In 1958-61, Shirley Temple made a brief return to show business with two television series. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In later years, she made occasional appearances on television talk shows, especially when she promoted her memoirs.


Political, business, and diplomatic career

Shirley Temple as the U.S. Ambassador to Czechoslovakia - photo taken on October 25th, 1990
Shirley Temple as the U.S. Ambassador to Czechoslovakia - photo taken on October 25th, 1990

In 1967, Shirley Temple Black ran unsuccessfully for Congress against retired Korean War veteran Pete McCloskey. She ran on a platform supporting America's involvement in the Vietnam War. Following the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian empire in 1918 at the end of The Great War, the Czechs, Moravians, and Slovaks united to form the new nation of Czechoslovakia. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 67 days remaining. ... This article is about the year. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Paul Norton Pete McCloskey Jr. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


She went on to hold several diplomatic posts, serving as the U.S. delegate to many international conferences and summits. In 1969, She was appointed a delegate to the United Nations by President Richard M. Nixon. She was appointed United States Ambassador to Ghana (1974–76). In 1976, she became the first female Chief of Protocol of the United States which put in her charge of all State Department ceremonies, visits, gifts to foreign leaders and co-ordination of protocol issues with all U.S. embassies and consulates. She was United States Ambassador to Czechoslovakia (1989–92) and witnessed the Velvet Revolution. She commented, about her Ambassadorship, "That was the best job I ever had." In 1987 she was designated the first Honorary Foreign Service Officer in U.S. history by then U.S. Secretary of State, George Shultz. UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... The Chief of Protocol is an officer of the United States Department of State responsible for advising the President of the United States, the Vice President, and the Secretary of State on official matters of national and international diplomatic protocol. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Following the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian empire in 1918 at the end of The Great War, the Czechs, Moravians, and Slovaks united to form the new nation of Czechoslovakia. ... Non-violent protesters face armed policemen The Velvet Revolution (Czech: , Slovak: ) (November 16 – December 29, 1989) refers to a non-violent revolution in Czechoslovakia that saw the overthrow of the Communist government there;[1] it is seen as one of the most important of the Revolutions of 1989. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ...


Temple served on the board of directors of some large enterprises including The Walt Disney Company (1974–75), Del Monte, Bancal Tri-State, and Fireman's Fund Insurance. Her non-profit board appointments included the Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Council of American Ambassadors, the World Affairs Council, the United States Commission for UNESCO, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, the United Nations Association, and the U.S. Citizen's Space TaskForce. Disney redirects here. ... Del Monte Foods (NYSE: DLM) is an American food production and distribution company based in San Francisco, California. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... Stanford redirects here. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an influential and independent, nonpartisan foreign policy membership organization founded in 1921 and based at 58 East 68th Street (corner Park Avenue) in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C. Through its membership, meetings, and studies, it has been... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... The United Nations Association is an international charitable trust which styles itself as an independent authority on the United Nations. ...


She received honorary doctorates from Santa Clara University and Lehigh University, a Fellowship from College of Notre Dame, and a Chubb Fellowship from Yale University. Temple now lives in Woodside, California. The Santa Clara Mission is a notable on-campus landmark. ... Lehigh University is a private, co-educational university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the United States. ... Founded in 1873, in Baltimore, by the School Sisters of Notre Dame, College of Notre Dame of Maryland was the first Catholic college for women to award the four–year baccalaureate degree. ... Yale redirects here. ... Woodside (pop. ...


Breast cancer

Temple is often remembered as the first celebrity to publicly discuss her involvement with this form of cancer, providing education and inspiration to many. In an interview published on the web page of the American Cancer Society, actress Barbara Barrie is quoted as saying: The American Cancer Society (ACS) is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy and service. ... Barbara Barrie (born Barbara Ann Berman on May 23, 1931 to a Jewish family in Chicago, but raised in Texas) is an American actress and author of childrens books. ...

Shirley Temple Black was the first person who said, on national television, 'I have breast cancer.' It wasn't Betty Ford, it was Shirley Temple, child star. One of the greatest stars of the world ever. And, she was so brave to say that, because first of all, people never said "cancer" and they never said "breast", not in public. She said it and she set the whole ball rolling. People don't remember that, but she did it.[7]

Temple appeared on the cover of People magazine in 1999 with the title "Picture Perfect" and again later that year as part of their special report, "Surviving Breast Cancer". She appeared at the 70th Academy Awards and also in that same year received Kennedy Center Honors. Betty Fords official White House portrait, painted in 1977 by Felix de Cossio Elizabeth Anne Bloomer Warren Ford (born April 8, 1918) is the widow of former United States President Gerald R. Ford and was the First Lady from 1974 to 1977. ... People (full name People Weekly) is a weekly American magazine of celebrity and human interest stories, published by Time Inc. ... The 70th Academy Awards were noted for their high ratings and the 11 wins racked up by the Best Picture, Titanic. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Recent activity

In 1999, she hosted the AFI's 100 Years... 100 Stars awards show on CBS, a special list from the American Film Institute and part of the AFI 100 Years... series. Part of the AFI 100 Years. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The American Film Institute, celebrating the 100th anniversary of film, created several top 100 lists covering movies in United Statesian cinema. ...


In 2001, she served as a consultant on the ABC Television Network production of Child Star: The Shirley Temple Story, based on part one of her autobiography. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ...


In 2004, she teamed with Legend Films to restore, colorize and release her earliest black and white films, as well as episodes of her 1960 television series (originally shot on color videotape), The Shirley Temple Storybook Collection. Legend Films, a San Diego-based company, was founded in August 2001. ... A colorized image of Laurel and Hardy, from March of the Wooden Soldiers (formally Babes in Toyland). ...


On September 12, 2005, Screen Actors Guild president Melissa Gilbert announced that Temple would receive the Guild's most prestigious honor, the Lifetime Achievement Award. Gilbert said: is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ... Melissa Ellen Gilbert (born May 8, 1964) is an American actress, writer and producer, primarily in movies and television. ...

I can think of no one more deserving of this year's SAG Life Achievement award than Shirley Temple Black. Her contributions to the entertainment industry are without precedent; her contributions to the world are nothing short of inspirational. She has lived the most remarkable life, as the brilliant performer the world came to know when she was just a child, to the dedicated public servant who has served her country both at home and abroad for 30 years. In everything she has done and accomplished, Shirley Temple Black has demonstrated uncommon grace, talent and determination, not to mention compassion and courage. As a child, I was thrilled to dance and sing to her films and more recently as Guild president I have been proud to work alongside her, as her friend and colleague, in service to our union. She has been an indelible influence on my life. She was my idol when I was a girl and remains my idol today.[8]

References in popular culture

  • On The Jacksons Variety Show, Janet Jackson did a skit with brother Ronald to "On the Good Ship Lollipop".
  • New York band Interpol (band) mention her by name in their song 'The Specialist' with the line, "put a lid on Shirley Temple."
  • Shirley was mentioned in Weird Al Yankovic's song "Confessions Part III", in which the singer/comedian states that "in private, I really like to dress up as Shirley Temple and spank myself with a hockey stick."
  • Carol Burnett occasionally performed an impression of "On the Good Ship Lollipop", exaggerating the concentration in Temple's face to look angry or scowling.
  • Towards the end of the Phish song "The Wolfman's Brother," the name "Shirley Temple" can be heard numerous times.
  • The animated television series The Simpsons episode "Last Tap Dance in Springfield" features a former child-star turned tap-instructor, 'Little' Vicki Valentine, who is clearly modeled on Shirley. Also in "Treehouse of Horror III" during his rampage, King Kong (portrayed by Homer) eats a child actress similar to Shirley Temple.
  • On the animated television show Family Guy, Stewie Griffin sings "On the Good Ship Lollipop" to get the attention of airport security when his backpack full of concealed weapons goes through the x-ray.
  • When she first ran for public office, a poster was published showing her in one of her earliest movies; a caption read, "Vote for Me or I'll Hold My Breath."
  • In the animated feature film Shrek the Third, the Gingerbread Man sings "On the Good Ship Lollipop" to himself after seeing his life flash before his eyes.
  • Shirley Temple is the only person, besides The Beatles themselves, who appears more than once on the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover. She appears as a cut-out in the last row and a Shirley Temple doll is featured on the right side, wearing a shirt saying "Welcome The Rolling Stones".
  • The African-American stereotypes in some of Temple's films has been parodied on MADtv; specifically the scene from The Littlest Rebel when Bill Robinson teaches her to dance up and down the steps.
  • There is a non-alcoholic drink named after her. It consists of ginger ale or lemon-lime soda with grenadine (pomegranate syrup) and a whole cherry added. Consequently, a similar drink substituting cola for the ginger ale (usually referred to as a Roy Rogers) is known as a "Shirley Temple Black" in some regions.
  • In the episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation entitled The Arsenal of Freedom, Riker says during his interrogation that he serves aboard the USS Lollipop, stating that "it's a good ship."
  • She is one of the celebrities caricatured in Donald Duck's The Autograph Hound.
  • She is mentioned on the song "(The legend of) Miss Baltimore Crabs" from the musical Hairspray, on the line "Childhood dreams/for me were cracked/ when that damn Shirley Temple/ stole my frickin' act."
  • In the 1997 movie Cats Don't Dance, Darla Dimple is a spoof of child star Shirley Temple; her name was also taken from another child star of the thirties, Darla Hood.
  • The band Stone Temple Pilots originally wanted to call themselves "Shirley Temple's Pussy," but later changed it due to controversy but stuck with the initials of S.T.P.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The cover to the Jackson 5s first LP, Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5, released on Motown Records in 1969. ... Janet Damita Jo Jackson (born May 16, 1966) is an American singer, actress, songwriter, record producer, dancer, activist, pop icon, and younger sister of the King of Pop, Michael Jackson. ... On the Good Ship Lollipop was the trademark song of child actress Shirley Temple. ... For the international organisation, see Interpol. ... This article is about the musician. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933 in San Antonio, Texas) is an Emmy Award-winning actress, comedian, singer, dancer, and writer. ... This article is about the band. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Last Tap Dance in Springfield is the twentieth episode of the eleventh season of The Simpsons. ... Treehouse of Horror III (on-screen title: The Simpsons Halloween Special III) is the fifth episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ... For other uses, see King Kong (disambiguation). ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Stewie redirects here. ... This article is about the film. ... A gingerbread man is an anthropomorphic (human-like) figure made of gingerbread. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... This article is about the rock band. ... For other uses, see Mad TV (disambiguation). ... Bill Bojangles Robinson (May 25, 1878 – November 25, 1949) was a pioneer and pre-eminent African-American tap dance performer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dale Evans and Roy Rogers at the 61st Academy Awards Leonard Franklin Slye (November 5, 1911 – July 6, 1998), who became famous as Roy Rogers, was a singer and cowboy actor. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... The Arsenal of Freedom is a first season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, first broadcast April 11, 1988. ... This article is about the Star Trek character. ... Donald Duck is an animated cartoon and comic-book character from Walt Disney Productions. ... Hairspray is a musical with music by Marc Shaiman, lyrics by Scott Wittman and Shaiman and a book by Mark ODonnell and Thomas Meehan, based on the 1988 John Waters movie Hairspray. ... Cats Dont Dance is a 1997 animated family feature film, notable as the only animated feature produced by the short-lived Turner Entertainment animation unit. ... Darla Jean Hood (November 8, 1931 – June 13, 1979) was an American child actress. ... Stone Temple Pilots (abbreviated STP) was a popular Grammy Award-winning American rock band in the 1990s and early 2000s, consisting of Scott Weiland (vocals), brothers Robert (bass guitar, vocals) and Dean DeLeo (guitar), and Eric Kretz (drums, percussion). ...

See Also

Salvador Dalí's painting Shirley Temple, The Youngest, Most Sacred Monster of the Cinema in Her Time Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Shirley Temple, The Youngest, Most Sacred Monster of the Cinema in Her Time (or Shirley Temple, The Youngest, Most Sacred Monster of Contemporary Cinema), also known as the Barcelona Sphinx [1] is a 1939 artwork in gouache, pastel and collage on cardboard by surrealist painter Salvador Dalí. It measures 75cm...


References

  1. ^ The Official Shirley Temple Website
  2. ^ Maltin, Leonard, and Richard W. Bann (1977, rev. 1992). The Little Rascals: The Life & Times of Our Gang. New York: Crown Publishing/Three Rivers Press. ISBN
  3. ^ Biography of Shirley Temple Black. Kennedy Center.org.
  4. ^ Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named ae
  5. ^ Shirley Temple's Childhood. Allmydolls.com Access date: 27 July 2007.
  6. ^ a b Kovel's Price Guide to Collectibles - Shirley Temple. Kovel.com. Access date: 2 December 2007.
  7. ^ Barbara Barrie. American Cancer Society Cancer Survivors Network.
  8. ^ Shirley Temple Black Honored with 2005 Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award, at the Awards official website; last accessed August 12, 2006.

is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Awards
Preceded by
None
Academy Juvenile Award
1934
Succeeded by
Deanna Durbin & Mickey Rooney
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Julian Martin Niemczyk
United States Ambassador to Czechoslovakia
1989 – 1992
Succeeded by
Adrian A. Basora
Awards
Preceded by
James Garner
Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award
2005
Succeeded by
Julie Andrews
Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... This award is officially called the Honorary Juvenile Award. ... Deanna Durbin (born Edna Mae Durbin on December 4, 1921, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to English immigrant parents) was a popular young singer and actress in Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Following the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian empire in 1918 at the end of The Great War, the Czechs, Moravians, and Slovaks united to form the new nation of Czechoslovakia. ... For other uses, see James Garner (disambiguation). ... The Screen Actors Guilds National Honors and Tributes Committee bestows an annual Life Achievement Award for outstanding achievement in fostering the finest ideals of the acting profession. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Shirley Temple (357 words)
Temple made a number of films as a teenager-among them Miss Annie Rooney (1942), I'll Be Seeing You (1944), Since You Went Away (1944), The Bachelor and the Bobbysoxer (1947), and Fort Apache (1948)-but her appeal had faded, and the films were not successful.
From 1957 to 1959 Temple narrated the television series "Shirley Temple's Storybook." In 1967 she ran, unsuccessfully, as a Republican candidate for the Congress of the United States.
Temple was a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations (1969-1970), was U.S. ambassador to Ghana (1974-1976), and became the first woman in U.S. history to serve as chief of protocol (1976-1977), during the administration of President Gerald R. Ford.
Temple-Black, Shirley (785 words)
Shirley Temple’s first work as an actress was done at age three for a movie studio called Baby Burlesks, which produced works that parodied popular films by using children to play roles made famous by adults.
Shirley Temple Black is now retired and lives in Woodside, California, with her husband, Charles, where they have resided for over four decades raising Susan and their two children Lori and Charles, Jr.
Shirley Temple Black is a rarity in that she sparkled at age three on camera and hasn’t stopped since.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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