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Encyclopedia > Shire

A shire is an administrative area of Great Britain and Australia. The first shires were created by the Anglo-Saxons in what is now central and southern England. Shires were controlled by a royal official known as a "shire reeve" or sheriff. Historically shires were sub-divided into hundreds or wapentakes although other less common sub-divisions existed. In modern English usage shires are sub-divided into districts. Shire is also popular Surename in Somalia, which means "Delegate". The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... In England, a reeve was an official appointed to supervise lands for a lord. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A hundred is a geographic division used in England, Scandinavia, and some parts of the USA, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller administrative units. ... A hundred is a geographic division used in England, Scandinavia, and some parts of the USA, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller administrative units. ...


The word is pronounced to rhyme with "fire", except when it appears as part of a place name, when it rhymes with "fir".

Contents

Shires in Great Britain

In England and Wales, the term "shire county" is used to refer to county level entities which are not metropolitan counties. A shire county or non-metropolitan county in England, is a county level entity which is not a metropolitan county. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... The metropolitan counties of England are counties that cover large urban areas, each with several metropolitan districts. ...


It can also be used in a narrower sense, referring only to traditional counties ending in "shire". These counties are typically (though not always) named after their county town. The British Isles are divided into the following traditional counties (also vice counties or historic counties). ... A county town is the capital of a county in Ireland or the United Kingdom. ...


Shires in England

Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Derbyshire, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Lancashire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire. Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Bedfordshire is a county in England and forms part of the East of England region. ... Berkshire (IPA: or  ; sometimes abbreviated to Berks) is a county in England and forms part of the South East England region. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... The Cheshire Plain - photo taken adjacent to Beeston Castle The Cheshire Plain - photo taken towards Merseyside The Cheshire Plain panorama - photo taken from Mid-Cheshire Ridge Cattle farming in the county Black-and-white timbered buildings on Nantwich High Street Cheshire (or, archaically, the County of Chester)[1] is a... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Hampshire, sometimes historically Southamptonshire or Hamptonshire, (abbr. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom and part of the East of England Government Office region. ... Huntingdonshire (abbreviated Hunts) is a part of England around Huntingdon, which is currently administered as a local government district of Cambridgeshire. ... Lancashire is a county in North West England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the east of England. ... Leicestershire (IPA: , abbreviated Leics) is a landlocked county in central England. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in south-east England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Shropshire (abbreviated Salop or Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... A detailed map Stratford-upon-Avon Kenilworth Castle Warwickshire (pronounced //, //, or //) is a landlocked non-metropolitan county in central England. ... Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Of these, all but Huntingdonshire and Yorkshire are also administrative counties (but with different boundaries). Huntingdonshire is now administered as a district of Cambridgeshire, and Yorkshire is split between East, North, South and West Yorkshire, Greater Manchester, Lancashire, Cumbria and County Durham. The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England, in the United Kingdom. ... North Yorkshire is a county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which roughly encompasses the conurbation surrounding the City of Manchester, and has a population of 2. ... Lancashire is a county in North West England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Cumbria is a county in the North West region of England. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ...


The counties of Devon, Dorset, Rutland and Somerset were occasionally referred to with the "shire" suffix. This usage is now considered archaic. Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dɔ.sət], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... Oakham Castle Rutland is traditionally Englands smallest county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ...


Shires in Wales

Brecknockshire, Caernarvonshire, Cardiganshire, Carmarthenshire, Denbighshire, Flintshire, Monmouthshire, Montgomeryshire, Pembrokeshire, Radnorshire Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) Welsh, English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779... Brecknockshire (Welsh: ), also known as Breconshire, or the County of Brecon is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, and a former administrative county. ... Caernarfonshire, also known as Carnarvonshire or, in Welsh, as Sir Gaernarfon, is a maritime traditional county of Wales, bounded N. by the Irish Sea, E. by Denbighshire, S. by Cardigan Bay and Merionethshire, and W. by Caernarfon Bay and the Menai Straits, which separates it from Anglesey. ... Cardiganshire (Sir Aberteifi in Welsh) was a traditional county in Wales that existed between 1282 and 1974. ... Carmarthenshire (Welsh: ) is a county in Wales. ... Denbighshire (Welsh: Sir Ddinbych) is a county in North Wales. ... Flintshire (Welsh: ) is a principal area and county in north-east Wales. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy) is both a principal area and a traditional county in south-east Wales. ... Montgomeryshire (Welsh: Sir Drefaldwyn) is an inland traditional county of Wales. ... Pembrokeshire (Welsh: Sir Benfro) is a county in the southwest of Wales in the United Kingdom. ... Radnorshire (Welsh: Sir Faesyfed) is an inland traditional county of Wales, bounded to the north by Montgomeryshire and Shropshire, to the east by Herefordshire, to the south by Brecknockshire and to the west by Cardiganshire. ...


In Wales, the counties of Merioneth and Glamorgan are occasionally referred to with the "shire" suffix. The only traditional Welsh county that never takes "shire" is Anglesey. Merionethshire (Meirionnydd in Welsh) is a traditional county of Wales. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... Anglesey (Welsh: , pronounced (IPA)), is an island and county at the northwestern extremity of Wales. ...


Non-county shires

The suffix –shire was a generalised term referring to a district. It did not acquire the strong association with county until later, though the former Hexhamshire and Winchcombeshire were considered counties. The area of Richmondshire in North Yorkshire is today a local government district. The term shire thus predates the creation of England's counties, referring originally to a more local jurisdiction. A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Hexhamshire was a historic county of northern England. ... Winchcombeshire was a historic county in the South West of England in the 10th and 11th centuries. ... Richmondshire is a local government district of North Yorkshire in England. ... North Yorkshire is a county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ...


Other than these, the term was used for several other districts. Bedlingtonshire, Craikshire, Norhamshire and Islandshire were exclaves of County Durham, which were incorporated into Northumberland or Yorkshire in 1844. The suffix was also was used for many hundreds, wapentakes and liberties such as Allertonshire, Blackburnshire, Halfshire, Howdenshire, Leylandshire, Powdershire, Pydenshire, Salfordshire, Triggshire, Tynemouthshire, West Derbyshire and Wivelshire, counties corporate such as Hullshire, and other districts such as Applebyshire, Bamburghshire, Bunkleshire, Carlisleshire, Coldinghamshire, Coxwoldshire, Cravenshire, Hallamshire, Leekshire [citation needed], Mashamshire and Yetholmshire. Bedlingtonshire is an area in England, centred around the town of Bedlington. ... Norhamshire or North Durham was an exclave of County Durham in England. ... Islandshire is a region in England, centred around Lindisfarne or Holy Island, including many villages on the mainland. ... D is Bs exclave, but is not an enclave. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A hundred is an administrative division, frequently used in Europe and New England, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller geographical units. ... A wapentake is a term derived from the Old Norse, the rough equivalent of an Anglo-Saxon hundred. ... Allertonshire was a waepontake and libary in the East Riding of Yorkshire|North Riding]] of Yorkshire in England. ... Blackburnshire was a former district of England around the town of Blackburn. ... Howdenshire was a wapentake and a liberty of England, lying around the town of Howden in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ... The Leyland hundred, or Leylandshire, was a hundred of the English county of Lancashire. ... The hundred of Salford (sometimes known as Salfordshire) was an ancient division of the county of Lancashire. ... The hundred of Trigg (also known as Triggshire) was an ancient hundred of Cornwall. ... The hundred of West Derby (sometimes known as West Derbyshire, not to be confused with Derbyshire, which has a district formerly called West Derbyshire) is an ancient subdivision of Lancashire, covering the south-west of the county. ... A county corporate or corporate county was a form of local government in England and Wales. ... Hullshire (or the County of Hull) was a former district of England. ... Craven is a local government district in the English county of North Yorkshire, centered around the market town of Skipton. ... Hallamshire (or Hallam) is the historical name for an area of South Yorkshire, England. ...


Shires in Scotland

Non-county shires were very common in Scotland. Kinross-shire and Clackmannanshire are probably survivals from such districts. In Scotland the term shire county is unknown, and the use of shire to refer to sheriffdoms or counties was intermittent, dating largely from the 19th century. It may be seen as an anglification or an example of the power of analogy. The traditional names, insofar as this is a reasonable term to employ, omit the suffix -shire. Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... Kinross-shire was a county of Scotland. ... Look Aboot Ye Clackmannanshire (Siorrachd Chlach Mhannainn in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and a lieutenancy area, bordering Perth and Kinross, Stirling and Fife. ... To anglicise (or in North American English anglicize) is to adapt a foreign word into the English language, often modifying its form to correspond to standard English French demoiselle, meaning little lady. Another common type of anglicisation is the inclusion of a foreign article as part of a noun (eg. ... Analogy is either the cognitive process of transferring or giving information from a particular subject (the analogue or source) to another particular subject (the target), or a linguistic expression corresponding to such a process. ...


Aberdeenshire, Ayrshire, Banffshire, Berwickshire, Clackmannanshire, Cromartyshire, Dumfriesshire, Dunbartonshire, Fifeshire, Inverness-shire, Kincardineshire, Kinross-shire, Kirkcudbrightshire, Lanarkshire, Morayshire, Nairnshire, Peeblesshire, Perthshire, Renfrewshire, Ross-shire, Roxburghshire, Selkirkshire, Stirlingshire, Wigtownshire The traditional county of Aberdeenshire (Siorrachd Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) borders Banffshire and Inverness-shire to the west, Perthshire, Angus and Kincardineshire to the south, and the North Sea to the north and east. ... Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. ... Banffshire (Siorrachd Bhanbh in Gaelic) is a small traditional county in the north of Scotland. ... Berwickshire (Siorrachd Bhearaig in Gaelic) is a committee area of the Scottish Borders Council and a Lieutenancy area of Scotland, on the border with England. ... Look Aboot Ye Clackmannanshire (Siorrachd Chlach Mhannainn in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and a lieutenancy area, bordering Perth and Kinross, Stirling and Fife. ... Cromartyshire (Siorrachd Chromba in Gaelic) was a county in the north of Scotland, consisting of a series of enclaves within Ross-shire. ... Dumfriesshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Phris in Gaelic) was a county of Scotland. ... Dunbartonshire is one of the Traditional counties of Scotland, in that part of the country formerly called Lennox (which was a title of nobility). ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... Inverness-shire (Siorrachd Inbhir Nis in Gaelic) is one of the traditional counties of Scotland. ... Kincardineshire, also known as The Mearns (from A Mhaoirne meaning The Stewartry) is a traditional county on the coast of Northeast Scotland. ... Kinross-shire was a county of Scotland. ... Kirkcudbrightshire (pronounced Kir-COO-bri-shir, also known as the Stewartry of Kirkcudbright or as East Galloway, and Siorrachd Chille Chuithbheirt in Gaelic) is a traditional county of south-western Scotland, bounded on the north and north-west by Ayrshire, on the west and southwest by Wigtownshire, on the south... Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland. ... Morayshire or Elginshire (Siorrachd Mhoireibh in Gaelic) is one of the traditional counties of Scotland, bordering Nairnshire to the west, Inverness-shire to the south, and Banffshire to the east. ... Nairnshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Narann in Gaelic) is a small traditional county of Scotland, centred around Nairn, the traditional county town. ... Peeblesshire (Siorrachd nam Pùballan in Gaelic) is a traditional county in Scotland. ... Perthshire (Siorrachd Pheairt in Gaelic) was a county in central Scotland, which extended from Strathmore in the east, to the Pass of Drumochter in the north, Rannoch Moor and Ben Lui in the west, and Aberfoyle in the south. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... Ross-shire (Siorrachd Rois in Gaelic), or simply Ross, is a traditional county of Scotland bordering on Sutherland, Cromartyshire (of which it contains many enclaves), Inverness-shire and on an exclave of Nairnshire. ... Roxburghshire (Siorrachd Rosbroig in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland. ... Selkirkshire or the County of Selkirk is a registration county of Scotland. ... Stirlingshire (Siorrachd Sruighlea in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland, based around Stirling, the traditional county town. ... Wigtownshire is a small traditional county in the south west of Scotland. ...


In Scotland four counties have alternative names with the "shire" suffix: Angus (Forfarshire), East Lothian (Haddingtonshire), Midlothian (Edinburghshire) and West Lothian (Linlithgowshire). Sutherland is occasionally still referred to as Sutherlandshire, despite there being no town called Sutherland. Similarly, Argyllshire, Buteshire and Caithness-shire are sometimes found. Also, Morayshire was previously called Elginshire. Angus (Aonghas in Gaelic) is one of the 32 local government council areas of Scotland, and a lieutenancy area. ... East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a lieutenancy Area. ... The central portions of the old province of Lothian in Scotland, centred around Edinburgh, became known as Midlothian, Scotland. ... West Lothian or Linlithgowshire (Lodainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy area. ... Sutherland (Cataibh in Gaelic) is a committee area of the Highland Council, Scotland, a registration county, and a lieutenancy area. ... Argyll, sometimes called Argyllshire, is one of the traditional counties of Scotland. ... Alternate meaning: Bute (mythology) Bute, sometimes known as Buteshire, is a small traditional county of Scotland. ... Caithness (Gallaibh in Gaelic)[1] is a committee area of Highland Council, Scotland; a lieutenancy area; and a registration county, Caithness was formerly a district within the Highland region from 1975 to 1996 and a local government county with its own county council from 1890 to 1975. ...


Shires in Australia

Shire is the most common word in Australia for the smallest local government areas by population. The states of New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia use shire for this unit. South Australia and Tasmania use district. A shire has the same powers as the next largest units, the town and city. In NSW, the expression 'The Shire' commonly refers to the Sutherland shire. Local Government Area (abbreviated LGA) is a term used in Australia (and especially by the Australian Bureau of Statistics) to refer to areas controlled by each individual Local Government. ... Capital Sydney Government Const. ... Emblems: Pink heath (floral)Weedy Seadragon (Aquatic) helmeted honeyeater (bird) Leadbeaters possum (faunal) Motto: Peace and Prosperity Slogan or Nickname: Garden State, The Place To Be, On The Move Other Australian states and territories Capital Melbourne Government Const. ... Emblems: Faunal - Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus); Floral - Cooktown orchid (Dendrobium bigibbum); Bird - Brolga (Grus rubicunda); Aquatic - Barrier Reef Anemonefish (Amphiprion akindynos); Gem - Sapphire; Colour - Maroon Motto: Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Const. ... Emblems: Floral - Kangaroo Paw (Anigozanthos manglesii); Mammal - Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus); Bird - Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) Motto: none Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Const. ... Emblems: Hairy Nosed Wombat (faunal); Leafy Seadragon (marine); Piping Shrike (bird: unofficial); Sturts Desert Pea (floral); Opal (gemstone) Motto: United for the Common Wealth Slogan or Nickname: Festival State Other Australian states and territories Capital Adelaide Government Const. ... Emblems: Flora - Tasmanian Blue Gum; Mineral - Crocoite Motto: Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Slogan or Nickname: The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Const. ... Local government areas called districts are used, or have been used, in several countries. ... Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a residential community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... The city of Chicago, as seen from the sky A city is an urban area that is differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... Sutherland Shire is a Local Government Area in southern Sydney, Australia. ...


Shires in United States (Virginia)

In 1634, eight shires were created in the Virginia Colony by order of the King of England. They were renamed as counties only a few years later. They were: Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ...

Of these, five are considered still extant in essentially their same political form in Virginia as of 2006, although most boundaries have changed in almost 400 years. Northampton County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Charles City Shire was formed in 1634 in the Virginia colony. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... Charles River Shire was one of eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ... Elizabeth City Shire was one of eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Henrico County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... Henrico County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... James City Shire was formed in the British colony of Virginia in 1634. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... Warwick River Shire was one of eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Warroysoyaoke Shire was formed in 1634 in the Virginia colony. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Isle of Wight Area  - Total  - Water 940 km² (363 mi²) 121 km² (47 mi²) 12. ... It has been suggested that Rest of Virginia be merged into this article or section. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Shire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (587 words)
Shires were controlled by a royal official known as a "shire reeve" or sheriff.
In Wales, the counties of Merioneth and Glamorgan are occasionally referred to with the "shire" suffix.
Shire is the most common word in Australia for the smallest local government areas by population.
The Shire (2299 words)
The Shire was a peaceful and bountiful land in Eriador in northwestern Middle-earth.
The Shire was 40 leagues (120 miles) across from the Far Downs on its western edge to the Brandywine River on the east.
In 1975, according to Shire records, the Hobbits sent a company of archers to the Battle of Fornost, where the Witch-king of Angmar was defeated and driven from the north.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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