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Encyclopedia > Shiraz
Shirāz
شیراز
Location of Shirāz in Iran
Coordinates: 29°37′N 52°32′E / 29.617, 52.533
Country Flag of Iran Iran
Province Fārs
County Shirāz
Elevation 1,500 m (5,200 ft)
Population (2005)
 - City 1,755,955
  estimate
Time zone IRST (UTC+3:30)
Eram Garden, Shiraz' most popular garden.
Eram Garden, Shiraz' most popular garden.

Coordinates: 29°37′N, 52°32′E This map was generated using GMT software (The Generic Mapping Tools). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... Iran consists of 30 provinces: Provinces are governed from a local center, mostly the largest local city. ... ... The provinces of Iran are divided into counties or shahrestānhā (Persian: شهرستان, singular shahrestān), and each shahrestan is subdivided into districts or bakhshānhā (Persian: بخش, singular bakhsh). ... Shiraz County (Persian: شهرستان شیراز) is a county in Fars Province in Iran. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Iran Standard Time (IRST) is the time zone used in Iran. ... Shiraz can refer to: Shiraz is a city in Iran. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 660 KB) Summary Eram Garden, Shiraz, Iran, 2004. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 660 KB) Summary Eram Garden, Shiraz, Iran, 2004. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Shirāz (Persian: شیراز Shīrāz) is a city in southwest Iran and the capital of Fars Province Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ...


Shiraz is an ancient city located in a green plain, at the foot of Allah-o-Akbar Mountain. Shiraz has served as the capital of Iran many times. It was the capital of Persia during the Zand dynasty from 1750 until 1781 and capital of southern Iran from 1781 until 1794, as well as briefly during the Safavid period. It is known as the city of poetry, wine and roses. It is also considered by many Iranians to be the City of Love due to the many gardens and fruit-trees that can be seen in the city. It has a moderate climate and has been a regional trade center for more than a thousand years. The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Vakeel mosque, Shiraz. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Safavid Empire at its 1512 borders. ...


The city had an estimated population of 1,755,955 in 2005.[1] It is the capital of Fārs Province. Fārs (Persian: فارس) is one of the 30 provinces of Iran. ...

Contents

Geography

Image:Shiraz ihsan .png

Shirāz is located in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains at the foot of Allah-o-Akbar Mountain with an elevation of 1540 meters (5052 ft). The Zagros Mountains (Persian: رشته كوه زاگرس), (Kurdish: Çîyayên Zagrosê), make up Iran and Iraqs largest mountain range. ...


In relation to its neighboring provinces, Yazd and Khūzestān, Shirāz has a more moderate climate, with warm/hot summers and mild/cool winters. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Domes like this are quite common in Khuzestan province. ...


Besides to many beautiful streets in Shiraz, Qasrodasht is the longest street in the city which contains considerable number of gardens in both sides. These gardens have given a special feature to the city and really act as the lungs for it. Unfortunately many of these gardens are going to be dried for building apartments due to population growth in the city.


Culture

Shiraz is an important centre for Iranian culture. Hafiz and Saadi, the great Iranian poets have born in Shiraz. City is also famous for hospitality. Hafiz or Hafez (Arabic: حافظ), literally meaning guardian, is a term used by Muslims for people who have completely memorized the Quran. ... Saadi may refer to one of the following: Saadi (poet), the medieval Persian Sufi poet Saadi Dynasty, the Moroccan dynasty Vicente Saadi, the Argentine politician Saïd Sadi, the Algerian political activist Abd ar-Rahman as-Saadi, Islamic scholar of fiqh and tafsir Category: ...


Economy

The city's economic base is in its provincial products: it produces grapes, citrus fruits, cotton and rice.


In Shirāz itself, industries such as cement production, sugar, fertilizer, textile products, wood products, metalwork and rugs dominate.


Shirāz is also a major center for Iran's electronic industries and has a major oil refinery as well.


Shirāz is famous for its carpet production and flowers as well. It is also the origin of wine and as a result, the wine produced using the grapes from this region are given the name Shiraz in the city's honour. A carpet is any loom-woven, felted textile or grass floor covering. ...


Shiraz is a favorite place for southern settlers of province like Lar & Lamerd which work in Golf countries. They used to invest in Shiraz and city utilizes this advantage too much. Some modern malls and hotels have been constructed in recent years and the largest and the most equipped mall in the country (Persian Golf Complex) is now under construction near Golestan town north of the city.


Shiraz is one of the most important cities in tourism attraction in the country. Also many Iranian choose Shiraz as their destination for traveling.


Attractions of Shiraz

Eram Garden is a famous tourism attraction.
Eram Garden is a famous tourism attraction.

Major popular attractions in Shirāz include: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 675 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1075 × 955 pixel, file size: 502 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Based on public domain Image:Baghe_Eram_. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 675 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1075 × 955 pixel, file size: 502 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Based on public domain Image:Baghe_Eram_. ... The main facade of the building illustrates a fine example of Qajari architecture. ...

Panorama of the city

Nearby Shiraz are located: Saadi may refer to one of the following: Saadi (poet), the medieval Persian Sufi poet Saadi Dynasty, the Moroccan dynasty Vicente Saadi, the Argentine politician Saïd Sadi, the Algerian political activist Abd ar-Rahman as-Saadi, Islamic scholar of fiqh and tafsir Category: ... Khwaju Kermani (1280-1352) was a famous poet and Sufi mystic from Persia. ... Arg-i Karim khani has recently been repaired and preserved. ... Vakil bazar is the main bazar of shiraz and is located in the center of the city. ... Vakeel mosque. ... Nasir al-Mulk Mosque (Nasir ol molk) is a traditional mosque in Shiraz, Iran. ... Koran Gate, Shiraz Quran Gate (Persian: دروازه قرآن, Darvāzeh Ghorān) is the name of a famous historic gate in the southern-central Persian city of Shiraz. ... Qavam House (also widely called Narenjestan Qavam) is a traditional and historical house in Shiraz, Iran. ... A relief of a Qajar soldier on one of the walls of the mansion. ... The main facade of the building illustrates a fine example of Qajari architecture. ... Karim Khan Zand, (Persian: کریم خان زند), (c. ... Shah Cheragh is a tomb of brothers Amir Ahmad and Mir Muhammad, both of whom were brothers of Imam Reza, who took refuge in Shiraz, Iran during the Abbasid persecution of the Shia’ite sect. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x300, 91 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Shiraz, Iran User talk:Marmoulak/Gallery ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x300, 91 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Shiraz, Iran User talk:Marmoulak/Gallery ...

and more than 200 other sites of historical significance, according to Iran's Cultural Heritage Organization. Persepolis aerial view. ... Ruins of Bishapur Sassanian relief, Bishapur Bishapur (or Bishâpûr) is an ancient city situated south of modern Faliyan, Iran on the ancient road between Persis and Elam. ... Pasargadae (Persian: پاسارگاد) was a city in ancient Persia, and is today an archaeological site and one of Irans UNESCO World Heritage Sites. ... Map of Iran and surrounding countries, showing location of Firouzabad. ... Naqsh-e Rustam (in Persian: نقش رستم Nāqš-e Rostām) is an archaeological site located about 12 km northwest of Persepolis, in Fars province, Iran. ...


History of Shiraz

Shiraz is most likely more than 4000 years old. The earliest reference to the city is on Elamite clay tablets dated to 2000 BC, found in June of 1970, while digging to make a kiln for a brick making factory in SW corner of the city. The tablets written in ancient Elamite, name a city called Tiraziš.[1] Phonetically, this is interpreted as /tiračis/ or /ćiračis/. This name became Old Persian /širājiš/; through regular sound change comes the modern Persian name Shirāz. The name Shiraz also appears on clay sealings found at Qasr-i Abu Nasr, a Sassanid ruin, east of the city, (2nd century A.D.) . As early as the 11th century several hundred thousand people inhabited Shiraz. Its size has decreased through the ages. Incidentally the oldest sample of wine in the world dating to approximately 7000 years ago was also discovered on clay jars recovered outside of Shiraz. Elamite is an extinct language, which was spoken in the ancient Elamite Empire. ... Sassanid Empire at its greatest extent The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia during the era of the second Persian Empire, from 224 until 651, when the last Sassanid shah, Yazdegerd III, lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the Umayyad Caliphate...

pārs Province is home to three capitals in Persian history. The massive ruins of the Persian Empire's grand palace Persepolis, about 2500 years old, are about 60 km northeast of Shiraz, as a witness to the ancient glory of the Achaemenid empire. Persepolis, Firouzabad, and Pasargadae are nearby ancient cynosures of this ancient civilization. Persepolis aerial view. ... Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Dynasty was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire, including Cyrus II the Great, Darius I and Xerxes I. At the height of their power, the Achaemenid rulers of Persia ruled over territories roughly emcompassing some parts of todays Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon... Persepolis aerial view. ... Map of Iran and surrounding countries, showing location of Firouzabad. ... Pasargadae (Persian: پاسارگاد) was a city in ancient Persia, and is today an archaeological site and one of Irans UNESCO World Heritage Sites. ...


We know of Shiraz during the Sassanid era, (2nd to 6th century A.D.) as has been written in p126 of Hudud ul-'alam min al-mashriq ila al-maghrib, where two fire temples and a fortress called "Shahmobad" are reported. Hamdollah Mostowfi also verifies the existence of pre-Islamic settlements in Shiraz in his Nozhat ol-Qolub, p112. Shirāz as a city however began to grow in the 7th century when the power of the former regional capital Istakhr was broken by the Arabs. The major events during and after the Islamic conquest of Iran are: Hudud ul-alam min al-mashriq ila al-maghrib (حدود العالم من المشرق الی المغرب) meaning The Limits of The World from The East to The West is a tenth century Geography book written by an unknown author. ... Tomb of Hamdollah Mostowfi, Qazvin, Iran. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Istakhr(Ǐ-stáxÇœr), also known as Stakhr, is a city located in southern Iran close to Persepolis and Zohak. ... The Islamic conquest of Iran (637-651 CE) destroyed the Sassanid Empire and led to the eventual decline of the Zoroastrian religion in Iran. ...

  • 640-653: Fārs falls to the Arab armies of Umar. Shiraz in 641. Estakhr in 653.
  • 650-869: Seat of the Arab government of Fārs. Controlled from Baghdad with very limited Persian activity. Other towns in the region decline as Shiraz grows with new immigrants. Turkish tribes are brought to the region to serve as soldiers in the Arab army. Descendents of these tribes form ruling dynasties of the region in the next several centuries.
  • 790: Shiraz scholar Sibawayh publishes his writings. This is the first formal basis of Arabic Grammer.
  • 869: Saffarid dynasty leader Yaqub Leis liberates Shiraz. Baghdad Caliphate rule weakened. Many Arabs and Turks in the city are eliminated but a significant number choose to stay in Shiraz, as they have adopted Persian culture.
  • c870: Amr-o-Leis Saffari (Yaqub's brother) builds a mosque in Shiraz, that is still standing today (Masjed Jaume).
  • 933: Shiraz is Capital of the Buwayhid dynasty. Becomes cultural center under Emmad-al-dowleh, first Buyid Amir.
  • 937: Buyids eventually bring down the Caliphate of Baghdad and Shiraz gains international prominence. Literature, scinece, art and culture are promoted. Religious minorities are treated well. Christaians, Jews and Zoroastrians are among the ministers and consultants of the Buyid Amirs.
  • c950: Subterranean canal made in the mountains to bring fresh water to the city by Rokn-al-dawleh, Emmad's brother. The stream (called Abeh Rokni) still runs today, and is immortalized in poetry of Shiraz.
  • c1000: First wall built around Shiraz due to attacks by Seljuk Turks, (see also Turkmens). The Seljuks were supported by the Damascuss based remainder of the Caliphate, against the Buyids.
  • c1010: Over the next 50 years this war, as well as internal feuds among the Buyids destroys much of the city.
  • 1062: City is eventually captured by Seljuks, However, to the dismay of the Caliphate, the new rulers quickly adopt the Persian culture and many settle in Shiraz. The Seljuks actaully become geat patrons of Persian art and culture, as they build a great empire.
  • c1075: Shiraz is rebuilt to splendor by Seljuk Attabak Jalal-ed-din and his sons. Development attracts new immigrants from all corners of Persia, as well as Central Asia.
  • 1090: Revolts within the Seljuk army are prompted and supported by Damascuss and Baghdad as the First Crusade weakens the Seljuk military might, and empire. Successful rebels in Shiraz are the Songhorid Turks.
  • 1100: Shiraz becomes capital of the Songhorid dynasty of Turkish origin (Attabak-ane Fars).
  • 1100: Although they promote Sunni Islam on behalf of Baghdad, the Songhorid also eventually become die hard Persians. They settle in and rebuild Shiraz as their home.
  • 1105: A wall is restored to encircles the city with Eight gates. Influence of the Baghdad Caliphate is contained to mostly ceremonial terms.
  • c1110: Hanafi sect of the Sunni Muslims rule the region from Shiraz. Although Judaism, Christianity and Zoroastrianism are still freely practiced among a large minority in the city and the region. This tolerance promotes another migration wave into the city and the region. Many tribes of Turkish and Cacauss regions move to Shiraz, and surrounding areas. Many still live in the region (Qashqai, Lurs).
  • c1115: Shiraz is a center of the pious and the Jurists of the nation. Number of religious shrines ae built, many of which are still standing, among them: Masjid Atiq, Masjid Now.
  • 1170: Sheikh Ruzbehan (1128-1209), establishes own Sufi sect in Shiraz.
  • 1150-1195: Decline of Shiraz as dynastic feuds among the various ruling tribes and a famine ruin the city.
  • 1195: Saad ibn Zangi, a local Attabak, establishes rule and restores the city.
  • c1200 Moaref-al-Din Mosal-leha (1184-1291) chooses the pen name Saadi in the honor of the fair ruler Saad ibn Zangi.
  • 1280 Shiraz saved from Mongol invasion by diplomacy of Abu Bakr ibn Saad. Genghis Khan is so enamoured by the Persian ruler that names him Ktlug Khan and considers him a friend.
  • 1281: Grave site of Ahmad-ibn-Musa (son of the 7th imam of the shiites) is identified by Amir Moqarrab-alDin a Vazir of Abu Bakr, during excavation for a palace.
  • 1282: A shrine is built on the grave site. Today it is the holiest Muslim site in the city and the region, (Shah Cheragh).
  • 1284: Decline of Shiraz due to the high Taxes imposed by Mongols. Corruption and feuds resume.
  • 1287: Drought and Famine kills approximately 100,000 people in Shiraz.[2]
  • 1291: Saadi dies and is buried in his garden next to an artesian well. Currently the beautiful gardens are a major tourist attraction, with a still flowing well and stream next to Saadi's tomb.
  • 1297: Measels and Plague kill another 50,000 people in Shiraz and surrounding area.[3]
  • 1297: Female ruler Aubee Khatton and her daughter Kurdujin save lives and the city by their charitable foundations. They were Songhorid matrons who had married into the Mongols.
  • 1304: Injuids dynasty takes over and rebuild Shiraz, but their in-fighting eventually causes more destruction..
  • 1325: Ilkhanate period. Their rule is marked by warfare and destruction.
  • 1353: Muzaffarids rulers captures Shiraz. Once again Shiraz is the capital for Persia.
  • c1350: Traveller Ibn Battuta visits Shiraz and documents a great city, rich with gardens, streams, bazzars, and cleanly clothed people.
  • 1357: Muzaffarid Shah Shuja takes reign and revives the city.
  • 1360: Hafez (1310-1380) is patronized by Shah Shuja and settles in Bage-Mossalla where he establishes a great following. His tomb in the same garden is a revered and major tourist attraction for world travellers and Iranians alike.
  • 1382: Shah Shuja gives Timur's army with gifts and saves the city from Pillage again.*1384: After the death of Shah Shuja in-fighting flares up among the Muzaffarids and leads to several battles in Shiraz and eventual city decline.
  • 1387: Shirāz is occupied for a short period by Timur.
  • 1393: Timur occupies Shirāz for the second time. He appoints his grandson who has adopted the Persian culture as governor. Rebuilding of the city resumes.
  • 1400: Shiraz is known as the city of SAADI and HAFEZ. Their tombs, still intact today, become shrines.
  • 1410: Shiraz prospers with a population of 200,000. For a few years it is the capital of the Turkmen Aq Qoyunlu rulers.
  • 1470: Mongols and Turkmen, the invadors, are soon ousted from the city.
  • 1503: Saffavid ruler Shah Ismaeel captures Shiraz and kills or exiles most Sunni leaders to promote Shiism.
  • 1550: Allah-verdi Khan and his son Emam-Qoli-Khan governors of the Saffavid rebuild city.
  • 1575: Shiite followers grow in numbers, schools and shrines are built. Many are still standing, Madrese Khan.
  • c1590: Period of relative prosperity. Arts flourish. Shiraz artists and craftsmen are famous and utilized worldwide. See Taj Mahal
  • c1600: Shiraz wine discovered by the British and reported to be one of the best in the world.
  • 1621: British and French merchants frequent the city. Grapes are taken to Europe.
  • 1630: A flood destroys large parts of the town.
  • 1634: Mulla Sadra, a well known philosopher from Shiraz is prosecuted for heretical writings and opinions. He promotes the idea of a free thinking Moslem and writes agianst the practice of blindly following the edicts of the clergy (Thaghlid).
  • 1668: Another flood hits Shirāz.
  • 1724: Shirāz is sacked by Afghan invaders.
  • 1744: Nader Shah of the Afsharid dynasty captures Shiraz. Large sections of the city destroyed during wars.
  • 1747-1800: Three way power struggle in Iran between Afsharid dynasty, Zand, and the Qajars
  • 1760: Karim Khan Zand moves to Shiraz and takes the title People's Representative, (Vakil-ol-Roaya). He establishes the Zand Dynasty.
  • 1766: Shirāz becomes capital of the Zand dynasty. City is rebuilt. Structured into 11 quarters (10 Muslim and one Jewish). Huge moat and wall surround the city, with six gates. Culture, Arts and minorities flourish.
  • 1791: End of the Zand dynasty, and Shirāz' status as capital.
  • 1794: Shiraz captured by Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar, pillaged and destroyed.
  • 1800: Decline of the city under the Qajar dynasty
  • 1822: Plague and Cholera epidemics kill thousands.
  • 1824: An earthquake destroys parts of the town.
  • 1830: Plague of locusts destroys the crops, local agriculture and creates famine. Tens of thousands die and many more move out of the city. Population decreases to only about 19000 by diseases and outmigration.
  • 1844: A young merchant, Sayyid `Alí Muhammad and given the title of 'The Báb' (Arabic, meaning 'The Gate'), declared His Messianic mission and founded the Bábí Faith.
  • 1853: Another major earthquake hits Shirāz.
  • 1860: British influence prevails in southern Iran and Shiraz. The British are actively opposed by the native Qashqai tribes in the mountains outside the city.
  • 1880: Qavam family suppresses local unrests with the help of the British Indian Rifelmen.
  • 1883: First official census shows a population of 53,607.
  • 1907: Sur-e Esrafil, a widely circulated newspaper published in Shiraz by Mirza Jahangir Khan Shirazi, supports the Persian Constitutional Revolution. Qashqai leaders support Mirza Jahangir Khan in revolt against the government.
  • 1908: Mirza Jahangir Khan is executed and his paper shut down.
  • 1911: Seyyed Zia'eddin Tabatabaee, a local shiite leader publishes newspaper Banaye-Islam with the help of the British consulate in Shiraz.
  • 1918: Qashqai tribesmen with leader Naser Khan besiege the city. Central government power declines in Iran. British influence increases with the discovery of oil. They help local associates to suppress tribal revolts throughout the region.
  • 1919: Influenza epidemic kills 10,000. Iran is falling apart with Russian and British invasions from the north and south respectively. Shiraz belongs to the British.
  • 1921: Qajar dynasty ends. Reza Shah Pahlavi takes over, with Seyyed Zia'eddin Tabatabaee at his side.
  • 1945: Shirāz University opens.
  • 2005: Census reports show a population of 1,255,955.
  • 2005: Farshid Kazemi joined Pithawalla Group

Recently many historical sites in the city were renovated. The Shiraz International Airport is expanded. For other uses, see Umar (disambiguation). ... Sibawayh (سيبويه Sîbawayh in Arabic, سیبویه Sibuyeh in Persian) was a linguist of Persian origin born ca. ... The Saffarid dynasty of Persia ruled a short-lived empire centred on Seistan, a border district between modern-day Afghanistan and Iran, between 861-1003. ... The Buwayhids or Buyyids or Ä€l-i Buyeh, were a Yazdani tribal confederation from Daylam, a region on the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. ... The Seljuk coat of arms was a double headed eagle The Seljuk Turks (also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; in modern Turkish Selçuklular; in Persian سلجوقيان SaljÅ«qiyān; in Arabic سلجوق SaljÅ«q, or السلاجقة al-Salājiqa) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of... A caliphate (from the Arabic خلافة or khilāfah), is the Islamic form of government representing the political unity and leadership of the Muslim world. ... The Buwayhids or Buyyids or Āl-i Buyeh, were a Shiite tribal confederation from Daylam, a region on the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. ... The Buwayhids or Buyyids or Āl-i Buyeh, were a Shiite tribal confederation from Daylam, a region on the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. ... Combatants Christendom, Catholicism West European Christians, Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia Seljuks, Arabs and other Muslims The First Crusade was launched in 1095 by Pope Urban II with the dual goals of liberating the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land from Muslims and freeing the Eastern Christians from Muslim... // The Hanafi (Arabic حنفي) school is the oldest of the four schools of thought (Madhhabs) or jurisprudence (Fiqh) within Sunni Islam. ... Qashqai (also spelled Ghashghai, Qashqay, Kashgai and Qashqai) are a Turkic-speaking tribal confederation of clans in Iran. ... Lurs are an ethnic group of Iranian peoples. ... Abu Muhammad Sheikh Ruzbehan Baqli (1128-1209) was a poet, mystic, and sufi from Iran. ... Saadi may refer to one of the following: Saadi (poet), the medieval Persian Sufi poet Saadi Dynasty, the Moroccan dynasty Vicente Saadi, the Argentine politician Saïd Sadi, the Algerian political activist Abd ar-Rahman as-Saadi, Islamic scholar of fiqh and tafsir Category: ... For other uses, see Genghis Khan (disambiguation). ... Shah Cheragh is a tomb of brothers Amir Ahmad and Mir Muhammad, both of whom were brothers of Imam Reza, who took refuge in Shiraz, Iran during the Abbasid persecution of the Shia’ite sect. ... Saadi may refer to one of the following: Saadi (poet), the medieval Persian Sufi poet Saadi Dynasty, the Moroccan dynasty Vicente Saadi, the Argentine politician Saïd Sadi, the Algerian political activist Abd ar-Rahman as-Saadi, Islamic scholar of fiqh and tafsir Category: ... The House of Inju (Injuids or Injuids) was a Sunni dynasty that came to rule over Shiraz and Isfahan during the 14th century. ... Khanates of Mongolian Empire: Il-Khanate, Chagatai Khanate, Empire of the Great Khan (Yuan Dynasty), Golden Horde The Ilkhanate (also spelled Il-khanate or Il Khanate) was one of the four divisions within the Mongol Empire. ... The Muzaffarids were a Sunni Arab family that came to power in Iran following the breakup of the Ilkhanate in the 14th century. ... It has been suggested that Travelling route of Ibn Batuta be merged into this article or section. ... Shah Shuja was a 14th-century Muzaffarid ruler of Southern Iran. ... Hafez, detail of an illumination in a Persian manuscript of the Divan of Hafez, 18th century. ... Shah Shuja was a 14th-century Muzaffarid ruler of Southern Iran. ... Shah Shuja was a 14th-century Muzaffarid ruler of Southern Iran. ... Shah Shuja was a 14th-century Muzaffarid ruler of Southern Iran. ... Statue of Timur in Shahrisabz, Uzbekistan TÄ«mÅ«r bin Taraghay Barlas (Chagatai Turkic: تیمور - TÄ“mōr, iron) (1336 – February 1405) was a 14th-century warlord of Turco-Mongol descent[1][2][3][4], conqueror of much of Western and central Asia, and founder of the Timurid Empire (1370–1405... Statue of Timur in Shahrisabz, Uzbekistan TÄ«mÅ«r bin Taraghay Barlas (Chagatai Turkic: تیمور - TÄ“mōr, iron) (1336 – February 1405) was a 14th-century warlord of Turco-Mongol descent[1][2][3][4], conqueror of much of Western and central Asia, and founder of the Timurid Empire (1370–1405... ... The Safavids were a long-lasting Turkic-speaking Iranian dynasty that ruled from 1501 to 1736 and first established Shiite Islam as Persias official religion. ... Taj Mahal Location of the Taj Mahal within India The Taj Mahal (Devanagari: ताज महल, Nastaliq: تاج محل) is a mausoleum located in Agra, India. ... ملاصدرا or Mulla Sadra (aka Molla Sadra or Mollasadra) also called Sadr Ad-Din Ash- Shirazi (c. ... Afsharid Dynasty (1723-1735) Bronze statue of Nader Shah, by Master Sadighi. ... Afsharid Dynasty (1723-1735) Bronze statue of Nader Shah, by Master Sadighi. ... The Zand dynasty ruled southern and central Iran in the eighteenth century. ... The Qajar dynasty was the ruling family of Persia from 1796 to 1925. ... Vakeel mosque, Shiraz. ... Vakeel mosque, Shiraz. ... The Qajar dynasty was the ruling family of Persia from 1796 to 1925. ... The Qajar dynasty was the ruling family of Persia from 1796 to 1925. ... Shrine of the Báb at night from above in Haifa, Israel. ... The room where The Báb declared His mission on May 23, 1844 in His house in Shiraz. ... Qashqai (also spelled Ghashghai, Qashqay, Kashgai and Qashqai) are a Turkic-speaking tribal confederation of clans in Iran. ... Mirza Jahangir Khan (ميرزا جهانگيرخان) Mirzā Jahāngir Khān (Persian: ) (≈1870, or 1875, Shiraz — 1908, Tehran), also known as Mirzā Jahāngir Khān Shirāzi (شيرازى) and Mirzā Jahāngir Khān Sur-e Esrāfil (صور اسرافيل), was an Iranian writer and intellectual, and a revolutionary during the Iranian Constitutional Revolution (1905... The Persian Constitutional Revolution (also Constitutional Revolution of Iran) against the despotic rule of the last Qajar Shah started in 1905 and lasted until 1911. ... Qashqai (also spelled Ghashghai, Qashqay, Kashgai and Qashqai) are a Turkic-speaking tribal confederation of clans in Iran. ... Mirza Jahangir Khan (ميرزا جهانگيرخان) Mirzā Jahāngir Khān (Persian: ) (≈1870, or 1875, Shiraz — 1908, Tehran), also known as Mirzā Jahāngir Khān Shirāzi (شيرازى) and Mirzā Jahāngir Khān Sur-e Esrāfil (صور اسرافيل), was an Iranian writer and intellectual, and a revolutionary during the Iranian Constitutional Revolution (1905... Seyyed Ziaeddin Tabatabaee (Persian: سید ضیاءالدین طباطبایی) (1888 - 1969) was a Persian politician and the Prime Minister of Persia from February to May 1921 under Ahmad Shah, the last Shah of the Qajar dynasty. ... Qashqai (also spelled Ghashghai, Qashqay, Kashgai and Qashqai) are a Turkic-speaking tribal confederation of clans in Iran. ... The Qajar dynasty was the ruling family of Persia from 1796 to 1925. ... Reza Shah, also Reza Shah the Great, Reza Shah Pahlavi and Reza Pahlavi (Persian: , Rez̤ā PahlavÄ«), (March 16, 1878 – July 26, 1944), was Shah of Iran[1] from December 15, 1925 until he was forced to abdicate after the Anglo-Soviet invasion of Iran in September 16, 1941 by British... Seyyed Ziaeddin Tabatabaee (Persian: سید ضیاءالدین طباطبایی) (1888 - 1969) was a Persian politician and the Prime Minister of Persia from February to May 1921 under Ahmad Shah, the last Shah of the Qajar dynasty. ...


Agriculture has always been a major part of the economy in and around Shiraz. This is partially due to a relative abundance of water compared to the surrounding deserts. The Gardens of Shiraz and "Evenings of Shiraz" are famous throughout Iran and the middle east. The moderate climate and the beauty of the city has made it a major tourist attraction.


Shiraz is also home to many Iranian Jews, although most have immigrated to the United States and Israel in the last half of the twentieth century, particularly after the Islamic Revolution. Along with Tehran and Esfahan Shiraz is one of the handful of Iranian cities with sizable Jewish populations and more than one active synagogue. Persian Jews, or Iranian Jews, are a group of ancient Jewish communities living throughout the former greatest extents of the Persian Empire. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Isfahan or Esfahan can refer to either a city or a province in Iran: Isfahan (city) Isfahan (province) Isfahan (rugs) Ispahan a kind of rose and an older pronounciation of the citys name. ... A synagogue (from ancient Greek: , transliterated synagogē, assembly; Hebrew: beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: , shul; Ladino: , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ...


Shiraz in poetry

Baba Taher

شوم یک سر برونم تا به شیراز
که در هر منزلم صد آشنا بی


"Straight to Shiraz I will flee,
a hundred friends I'll find at every stop."


Hafez, "The Nightingale of Shiraz"

خوشا شیراز و وضع بی مثالش
خداوندا نگهدار از زوالش


"Pleasant is Shiraz and its incomparable state.
Oh lord, preserve it from decline!"


شیراز و آب رکنی و این باد خوش نسیم
عیبش مکن که خال رخ هفت کشور است


"Shiraz and the water of Roknabad, and this pleasant breeze,
Fault it not! For it is the beauty of seven nations."



Research and Higher education

Shiraz is home to a vibrant academic community. The major universities in or nearby Shirāz today are:

Shiraz International Airport.

Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, SUMS, is a large and prestigious medical school of Iran. ... Shiraz University of Medical Sciences is a well established medical school of Iran that even admits foreign students. ... Shiraz University of Technology (SUTECH) is a university in the capital of the Fars Province of Iran. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Shiraz_airport2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Shiraz_airport2. ...

Transportation

Shiraz is accessible via freeways to Isfahan, and roadways to Bushehr and the Persian Gulf.A railroad link to Isfahan is under construction. A metro urban railway system is also being built by the Shiraz urban railway organization.[2] Part of Shah Abbas large urban project in his new capital, the Chahār Bāgh Four Gardens, is a four-kilometer avenue in the city of Isfahan. ... Bushehr or Bushire (بوشهر), pop. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ...


Airports

Shiraz International Airport serves as the largest airport in the south provincial region of Iran. It has direct flight connections to Dubai, Bahrain, and Qatar. Shiraz Airport is found in Shiraz, Iran. ... Coordinates: , Emirate Dubai Government  - Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Area [1]  - Metro 4,114 km² (1,588. ...


Sports

Football:

 Shiraz is home to two football clubs in Iran's Premier Football League, Bargh Shiraz web site and Moghavemat e Sepasi web site and Moghavemate shiraz 

Basketball: A football team is the collective name given to a number of players who play together in a football game, be it association football (soccer), rugby, Australian football, American football, Gaelic football, or other version of football. ... Irans Premier Football League known as the Iran Premier League (IPL) and now officially as the Persian Gulf Cup is the most important football league in Iran, as well as the latest stage in the evolution of Iranian league football. ... Bargh Shiraz (برق شيراز in Persian) is a football club based in Shiraz, Iran. ...

 A.S SHIRAZ 

Wrestling:

 Hotel chamran 

Shiraz also has three stadiums for soccer:

 Hafezieh stadium with , 40,000 Capacity in 1945 Mianrood stadium with , 70,000 Capacity in 2005 Shiraz complex with , 100,000 Capacity in 2007 

Notable people

Sibawayh (سيبويه Sîbawayh in Arabic, سیبویه Sibuyeh in Persian) was a linguist of Persian origin born ca. ... Karim Khan Zand, (Persian: کریم خان زند), (c. ... Lotf Ali Khan (1769 - 1794) was the last shah of Persia (resigned 1789-94) of the Zand dynasty. ... Saadi may refer to one of the following: Saadi (poet), the medieval Persian Sufi poet Saadi Dynasty, the Moroccan dynasty Vicente Saadi, the Argentine politician Saïd Sadi, the Algerian political activist Abd ar-Rahman as-Saadi, Islamic scholar of fiqh and tafsir Category: ... Hafez, detail of an illumination in a Persian manuscript of the Divan of Hafez, 18th century. ... Before her arrest Zahra Ziba Kazemi-Ahmadabadi (زهرا کاظمی احمدآبادی in Persian)‎ (1949 - July 11, 2003) was an Iranian (Persian)-born freelance photographer, residing in Montreal (Canada), who died in the custody of Iranian officials following her arrest. ... Ladan and Laleh Bijani (in Persian: لادن Ùˆ لاله بیژنی) (January 17, 1974–July 8, 2003) were Iranian law graduates. ... Khwaju Kermani (1280-1352) was a famous poet and Sufi mystic from Persia. ... ملاصدرا or Mulla Sadra (aka Molla Sadra or Mollasadra) also called Sadr Ad-Din Ash- Shirazi (c. ... Seyyed Ziaeddin Tabatabaee (Persian: سید ضیاءالدین طباطبایی) (1888 - 1969) was a Persian politician and the Prime Minister of Persia from February to May 1921 under Ahmad Shah, the last Shah of the Qajar dynasty. ... The tomb of Ibn Khafif is in the old traditional quarters of Shiraz. ... Abu Muhammad Sheikh Ruzbehan Baqli (1128-1209) was a poet, mystic, and sufi from Iran. ... Meulana Shahin Shirazi was a Persian Jewish poet of 14th century Shiraz, Iran. ... Moin al-Din Junayd ibn Mahmud ibn Muhammad Baghnovi Shirazi was a Sufi mystic and poet of Persia from the 14th century. ... Khosro Naghed (Persian: خسرو ناقد, born 1950 Shiraz) is a notable Persian scholar, Iranologist and linguist. ... Mohsen Kadivar Mohsen Kadivar (محسن کدیور, born June 7, 1959) is an Iranian Islamic philosopher, Shia cleric and activist. ... Ataollah Mohajerani (عطاالله مهاجرانی) is an Iranian historian, politician, journalist, and author. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Gholam Reza Azhari (1912 – November 5, 2001) was a military leader and Prime Minister of Iran. ... Pejman Akbarzadeh (Persian پژمان اكبرزاده, born 1980) is a Persian (Iranian) musician and researcher. ... Karim Emami (1930-2005) was a highly-regarded Iranian translator, editor, lexicographer and critic. ... Lt. ... Firouz Naderi (Born in Shiraz) is an Iranian-American scientist and the Associate Director of NASAs Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) responsible for Project Formulation and Strategy. ... Ebrahim Golestan is an Iranian filmmaker and literary figure, with a career spanning half a century. ... Jimmy Delshad is the Vice Mayor of Beverly Hills California. ... Beverly Hills is a city in the western part of Los Angeles County, California. ... Nima is the name of a well-known Persian pop musician, television producer and television host. ...

Sister cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Tajikistan. ... Dushanbe (Душанбе), population 562,000 people (2000 census), is the capital of Tajikistan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cyprus. ... Nicosia, known locally as Lefkosia (Greek: Λευκωσία) or Lefkosa (Turkish: Lefkoşa), population 177,410 (1992), is the capital of Cyprus. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_China. ... Chongqing (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Postal map spelling: Chungching, also Chungking) is the largest and most populous of the Peoples Republic of Chinas four provincial-level municipalities, and the only one in the less densely populated western half of China. ...

References

  1. ^ Cameron, George G. Persepolis Treasury Tablets, University of Chicago Press, 1948, pp. 115.
  2. ^ Wassaf, 'Abd Allah b. Fadl Allah. Tajziyat al-amsar wa-tazjiyat al-a'sar, known also as Ta'rikh-i Wassaf (written by 1327) Ed. ‘Abd al–Muhammad Ayati, Tahrir-i ta'rikh-i Wassaf. Intisharat i-Bunyad-i Farhang-i Iran, Tehran, §1346/1967, pp. 106-128.
  3. ^ Wassaf, 'Abd Allah b. Fadl Allah. Tajziyat al-amsar wa-tazjiyat al-a'sar, known also as Ta'rikh-i Wassaf (written by 1327) Ed. ‘Abd al–Muhammad Ayati, Tahrir-i ta'rikh-i Wassaf. Intisharat i-Bunyad-i Farhang-i Iran, Tehran, §1346/1967, pp. 359.

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Iransaga - Tombs of Hafez and Saadi, Shiraz (258 words)
Iransaga - Tombs of Hafez and Saadi, Shiraz
Shiraz is closely linked to the great poets Hafez and Saadi, and the tombs of these poets are located today on the north bank of the Khoshk River.
Saadi's tomb is in the north-east of Shiraz.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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