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Encyclopedia > Ship

A ship is a large watercraft capable of offshore navigation. Ships may be operated by: Ship may refer to: Capital ship, warship Fire ship, ship that is filled with combustibles Liberty ship, cargo ship built in the United States during World War II Naval ship, ship or boat used for military purposes Q-ship, attack vessel disguised as a civilian ship Receiving ship, ship that... Image File history File links Amerigo_vespucci_1976_nyc_aufgetakelt. ... Image File history File links Amerigo_vespucci_1976_nyc_aufgetakelt. ... A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a square rigged sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. ... The Amerigo Vespucci The Amerigo Vespucci is a world-famous tall ship of the Marina Militare, named after the explorer Amerigo Vespucci. ... New York Harbor, a geographic term, refers collectively to the rivers, bays, and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City. ... A watercraft is a vehicle designed to float on and move across (or through) water for pleasure, physical exercise (in the case of many small boats), transporting people and/or goods, or military missions. ...

  • Governments (military, rescue, research, transportation)
  • Private companies and institutions (transportation, offshore resources, research)
  • Individuals (large yachts, research).

Contents

Nomenclature

A ship usually has enough size to carry its own boats, such as lifeboats, dinghies, or runabouts. A rule of thumb used is "a boat can fit on a ship, but a ship can't fit on a boat". Consequently submarines are referred to as "boats", because early submarines were small enough to be carried aboard a ship in transit to distant waters. Other types of large vessels which are traditionally called boats are the Great Lakes freighter, the riverboat, and the ferryboat. Though large enough to carry their own boats and/or heavy cargoes, these examples are designed for operation on inland or protected coastal waters. Often local law and regulation will define the exact size (or the number of masts) which a boat requires to become a ship. Nautical means related to sailors, particularly customs and practices at sea. Naval is the adjective pertaining to ships, though in common usage it has come to be more particularly associated with the noun "navy". For other uses, see Boat (disambiguation). ... For the 1944 movie, see Lifeboat (film). ... Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. ... A runabout is any small motorboat holding between four and eight people, well suited to moving about on the water. ... A rule of thumb is an easily learned and easily applied procedure for approximately calculating or recalling some value, or for making some determination. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... The ill-fated SS Edmund Fitzgerald, built in the classic dual superstructure style with her wheelhouse up near the bow. ... A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ... The Pride of Burgundy, a P&O Ferries car ferry on the Dover-Calais route A ferry is a boat or a ship carrying passengers, and possibly their vehicles, on a relatively short-distance, regularly-scheduled service. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Three types of mariners are seen here in the wheelhouse: a master, an able seaman, and a harbour pilot. ... This article is about the body of water. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ...


Measuring ships

One can measure ships in terms of overall length, length of the waterline, beam (breadth), depth (distance between the crown of the weather deck and the top of the keelson), draft (distance between the highest waterline and the bottom of the ship) and tonnage. A number of different tonnage definitions exist and are used when describing merchant ships for the purpose of tolls, taxation, etc. A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ... The draft of a ships hull is the vertical distance from the bottom of the hull to the waterline. ... Tonnage is a measure of the size or cargo capacity of a ship. ...


In Britain until the Samuel Plimsoll Merchant Shipping Act of 1876, ship-owners could load their vessels until their decks were almost awash, resulting in a dangerously unstable condition. Additionally, anyone who signed onto such a ship for a voyage and, upon realizing the danger, chose to leave the ship, could end up in jail.


Samuel Plimsoll, a member of Parliament, realised the problem and engaged some engineers to derive a fairly simple formula to determine the position of a line on the side of any specific ship's hull which, when it reached the surface of the water during loading of cargo, meant the ship had reached its maximum safe loading level. To this day, that mark, called the "Plimsoll Mark", exists on ships' sides, and consists of a circle with a horizontal line through the centre. On the Great Lakes of North America the circle is replaced with a diamond. Because different types of water, (summer, fresh, tropical fresh, winter north Atlantic) have different densities, subsequent regulations required painting a group of lines forward of the Plimsoll mark to indicate the safe depth (or freeboard above the surface) to which a specific ship could load in water of various densities. Hence the "ladder" of lines seen forward of the Plimsoll mark to this day. This is called the "freeboard mark" or "load line mark"in the marine industry. Memorial to Samuel Plimsoll on Victoria Embankment London Samuel Plimsoll (10 February 1824 – 3 June 1898) was a British politician and social reformer, now best remembered for having devised the Plimsoll line. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In mathematics and in the sciences, a formula (plural: formulae, formulæ or formulas) is a concise way of expressing information symbolically (as in a mathematical or chemical formula), or a general relationship between quantities. ... Waterline refers to an imaginary line marking the level at which ship or boat floats in the water. ... Circle illustration This article is about the shape and mathematical concept of circle. ...


Propulsion

Pre-mechanization

Ships of the world in 1460, according to the Fra Mauro map.
Ships of the world in 1460, according to the Fra Mauro map.

Until the application of the steam engine to ships in the early 19th century, oars propelled galleys or the wind propelled sailing ships. Before mechanisation, merchant ships always used sail, but as long as naval warfare depended on ships closing to ram or to fight hand-to-hand, galleys dominated in marine conflicts because of their maneuverability and speed. The Greek navies that fought in the Peloponnesian War used triremes, as did the Romans contesting the Battle of Actium. The use of large numbers of cannon from the 16th century meant that maneuverability took second place to broadside weight; this led to the dominance of the sail-powered warship. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 595 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1071 × 1080 pixel, file size: 258 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ships of the Fra Mauro map (1460). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 595 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1071 × 1080 pixel, file size: 258 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ships of the Fra Mauro map (1460). ... The Fra Mauro map (1459) in Venice (inverted, South is normally at the top). ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... A French galley and Dutch men-of-war off a port by Abraham Willaerts, painted 17th century. ... Traditional wooden cutter under sail. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Replica battering ram at Ch teau des Baux, France A battering ram is a weapon used from ancient times. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... “Athenian War” redirects here. ... A Greek trireme. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Combatants Octavian Mark Antony, Cleopatra VII of Egypt Commanders Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Mark Antony Strength 260 warships, mostly liburnian vessels 220 warships, mostly quinqueremes and 60 egyptian warships Casualties Unknown Almost all of Antonys fleet The Battle of Actium was a naval battle of the Roman Civil War between... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ...


Reciprocating steam engines

The development of piston-engined steamships was a complex process. Early steamships were fueled by wood, later ones by coal or fuel oil. Early ships used stern or side paddle wheels, later ones used screw propellers.


The first commercial success accrued to Robert Fulton's North River Steamboat (often called Clermont) in the US in 1807, followed in Europe by the 45-foot Comet of 1812. Steam propulsion progressed considerably over the rest of the 19th century. Notable developments included the steam surface condenser, which eliminated the use of sea water (salt water) in the ship's boilers. This permits higher steam pressures, and thus the use of higher efficiency multiple expansion (compound) engines. As the means of transmitting the engine's power, paddle wheels gave way to more efficient screw propellers. For other persons named Robert Fulton, see Robert Fulton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The paddle steamer PS Comet was built for Henry Bell, hotel and baths owner in Helensburgh, and began a passenger service in 1812 on the River Clyde between Glasgow and Greenock, the first commercially successful steamboat service in Europe. ... Look up condenser in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship driven by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... For other uses, see Propeller (disambiguation). ...


Steam turbines

Steam turbines were fueled by coal or later, fuel oil, or nuclear power.


The marine steam turbine developed by Sir Charles Algernon Parsons, raised the power to weight ratio. He achieved publicity by demonstrating it unofficially in the 100-foot Turbinia at the Spithead naval review in 1897. This facilitated a generation of high-speed liners in the first half of the 20th century and rendered the reciprocating steam engine obsolete, first in warships, and later in merchant vessels. A rotor of a modern steam turbine, used in a power plant A steam turbine is a mechanical device that extracts thermal energy from pressurized steam, and converts it into useful mechanical work. ... Charles Algernon Parsons Compund Steam Turbine, circa 1887 Sir Charles Algernon Parsons, O.M. (June 13, 1854 – February 11, 1931) was a British engineer, best known for his invention of the steam turbine. ... Turbinia was the first steam turbine powered steamship, built as an experimental vessel in 1894 and demonstrated dramatically at the Spithead Navy Review in 1897, setting the standard for the next generation of steamships. ... Categories: UK geography stubs ... British tradition, where the monarch reviews the massed Royal Navy. ...


In the early 20th century, heavy fuel oil came into more general use and began to replace coal as the fuel of choice in steamships. Its great advantages were convenience, reduced manning due to removing the need for trimmers and stokers, and reduced space needed for fuel bunkers. An oil tanker taking on bunker fuel. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ...


In the second half of the 20th century, rising fuel costs almost led to the demise of the steam turbine. Most new ships since around 1960 have been built with diesel engines. The last major passenger ship built with steam turbines was the Fairsky, launched in 1984. Similarly, many steam ships were re-engined to improve fuel efficiency. One high profile example was the 1968 built Queen Elizabeth 2 which had her steam turbines replaced with a diesel-electric propulsion plant in 1986. A diesel engine built by MAN AG in 1906 Rudolf Diesels 1893 patent on his engine design The Diesel engine is an internal combustion engine which operates using the Diesel cycle named after German engineer Rudolf Diesel, who invented it in 1876, based on the hot bulb engine, and... The Pacific Sky, (formerly Sky Princess), was an Australian cruise ship operated by P&O Cruises Australia (November 2000 - May 2006). ... The Queen Elizabeth 2, often called the QE2, was the flagship of the Cunard Line from 1969 until she was succeeded by RMS Queen Mary 2 in 2004. ...


Most new-build ships with steam turbines are specialist vessels such as nuclear-powered vessels, and certain merchant vessels (notably Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and coal carriers) where the cargo can be used as bunker fuel. Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been processed to remove either valuable components e. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ...


LNG carriers

New LNG carriers (a high growth area of shipping) continue to be built with steam turbines. The natural gas is stored in a liquid state in cryogenic vessels aboard these ships, and a small amount of 'boil off' gas is needed to maintain the pressure and temperature inside the vessels, to within operating limits. The 'boil off' gas provides the fuel for the ship's boilers, which provide steam for the turbines, the simplest way to deal with the gas. Technology to operate internal combustion engines (modified marine two stroke diesel engines) on this gas has improved however, so such engines are starting to appear in LNG carriers; with their greater thermal efficiency, less gas is burnt. Also, developments have been made in the process of re-liquefying 'boil off' gas, letting it be returned to the cryogenic tanks. The financial returns on LNG are potentially greater than the cost of the marine grade fuel oil burnt in conventional diesel engines, so the re-liquefaction process is starting to be used on diesel engine propelled LNG carriers. Another factor driving the change from turbines to diesel engines for LNG carriers is the shortage of steam turbine qualified sea going engineers. With the lack of turbine powered ships in other shipping sectors, and the rapid rise in size of the worldwide LNG fleet, not enough have been trained to meet the demand. It may be that the days are numbered for the last stronghold for steam turbine propulsion systems, despite all but sixteen of the orders for new carriers at the end of 2004 being for steam turbine propelled ships. [1] An LNG carrier is a ship designed for transporting liquefied natural gas. ... Cryogenics is a branch of physics (or engineering) that studies the production of very low temperatures (below –150 °C, –238 °F or 123 K) and the behavior of materials at those temperatures. ... The internal combustion engine is an engine in which the combustion of fuel and an oxidizer (typically air) occurs in a confined space called a combustion chamber. ... The two-stroke cycle of an internal combustion engine differs from the more common four-stroke cycle by having only two strokes (linear movements of the piston) instead of four, although the same four operations (intake, compression, power, exhaust) still occur. ... A diesel engine built by MAN AG in 1906 Rudolf Diesels 1893 patent on his engine design The Diesel engine is an internal combustion engine which operates using the Diesel cycle named after German engineer Rudolf Diesel, who invented it in 1876, based on the hot bulb engine, and...


Nuclear-powered steam turbines

In these vessels, the reactor heats steam to drive the turbines. Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ...


Partly due to concerns about safety and waste disposal, nuclear propulsion has become usual only in specialist vessels. In large aircraft carriers, the space formerly used for ship's bunkerage could be used instead to bunker aviation fuel. In submarines, the ability to run submerged at high speed and in relative quiet for long periods holds obvious advantage. A few cruisers have also employed nuclear power; as of 2006, the only ones remaining in service are the Russian Kirov class. An example of a non-military ship with nuclear marine propulsion is the Arktika class icebreaker with 75,000 shaft horsepower. Commercial experiments such as the NS Savannah proved uneconomical compared with conventional propulsion. Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and in most cases recover aircraft, acting as a sea... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... The USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga class cruiser. ... Radars: Voskhod MR-800 (Top Pair) 3D search radar on foremast Fregat MR-710 (Top Steer) 3D search radar on main mast 2 × Palm Frond navigation radar on foremast Sonar Horse Tail VDS (Variable Deep Sonar) Fire control: 2 × Top Dome for SA-N-6 fire control 4 × Bass Tilt... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Arktika class is a Russian class of nuclear powered icebreakers. ... NS Savannah, the first nuclear powered civilian ship NS Savannah, named for SS Savannah, the first steam-powered vessel to cross the Atlantic Ocean, was the first nuclear-powered cargo-passenger ship, one of only four nuclear-powered cargo ships ever built. ...


Reciprocating diesel engines

About 99% of modern ships use diesel reciprocating engines[citation needed]. The rotating crankshaft can power the propeller directly (with slow speed engines), via a gearbox (with medium and high speed engines) or via an alternator and electric motor (in diesel-electric vessels).


The reciprocating marine diesel engine first came into use in 1903 when the diesel electric rivertanker Vandal was put in service by Branobel. Diesel engines soon offered greater efficiency than the steam turbine, but for many years had an inferior power-to-space ratio. This article is about the fuel. ... A number of vehicles use a diesel-electric powerplant for providing locomotion. ... HMS Vandal (P64) was a Royal Navy U-class submarine built by Vickers-Armstrong at Barrow-in-Furness, yard number 838. ... Branobel (short for Brothers Nobel) was the oil company set up by Ludvig and Robert Nobel in Baku, Azerbaijan. ...


Diesel engines today are broadly classified according to

  • Their operating cycle: two-stroke or four-stroke.
  • Their construction: Crosshead, trunk, or opposed piston.
  • Their speed.
    • Slow speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed up to 300 revs/minute, although most large 2-stroke slow speed diesel engines operate below 120 revs/minute. Some very long stroke engines have a maximum speed of around 80 revs/minute. The largest, most powerful engines in the world are slow speed, two stroke, crosshead diesels.
    • Medium speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed in the range 300-900 revs/minute. Many modern 4-stroke medium speed diesel engines have a maximum operating speed of around 500 rpm.
    • High speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed above 900 revs/minute.

Most modern larger merchant ships use either slow speed, two stroke, crosshead engines, or medium speed, four stroke, trunk engines. Some smaller vessels may use high speed diesel engines. The two-stroke cycle of an internal combustion engine differs from the more common four-stroke cycle by having only two strokes (linear movements of the piston) instead of four, although the same four operations (intake, compression, power, exhaust) still occur. ... The four-stroke cycle of an internal combustion engine is the cycle most commonly used for automotive and industrial purposes today (cars and trucks, generators, etc). ... A crosshead bearing (or simply crosshead) is used in large reciprocating engines, whether internal combustion engines or steam engines. ... Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston diesel engines on the submarine USS Pampanito. ...


The size of the different types of engines is an important factor in selecting what will be installed in a new ship. Slow speed two-stroke engines are much taller, but the area needed, length and width, is smaller than that needed for four-stroke medium speed diesel engines. As space higher up in passenger ships and ferries is at a premium, these ships tend to use multiple medium speed engines resulting in a longer, lower engine room than that needed for two-stroke diesel engines. Multiple engine installations also give more redundancy in the event of mechanical failure of one or more engines and greater efficiency over a wider range of operating conditions.


As modern ships' propellers are at their most efficient at the operating speed of most slow speed diesel engines, ships with these engines do not generally need gearboxes. Usually such propulsion systems consist of either one or two propeller shafts each with its own direct drive engine. Ships propelled by medium or high speed diesel engines may have one or two (sometimes more) propellers, commonly with one or more engines driving each propeller shaft through a gearbox. Where more than one engine is geared to a single shaft, each engine will most likely drive through a clutch, allowing engines not being used to be disconnected from the gearbox while others keep running. This arrangement lets maintenance be carried out while under way, even far from port.


Gas turbines

Many warships built since the 1960s have used gas turbines for propulsion, as have a few passenger ships, like the jetfoil. This machine has a single-stage centrifugal compressor and turbine, a recuperator, and foil bearings. ... The Jetfoil Toppi is a ferry which connects Yakushima, Tanegashima Island and Kagoshima port in Japan A hydrofoil is a boat with wing-like foils mounted on struts below the hull. ...


Gas turbines are commonly used in combination with other types of engine. Most recently, the Queen Mary 2 has had gas turbines installed in addition to diesel engines. Due to their poor thermal efficiency at low power (cruising) output, it is common for ships using them to have diesel engines for cruising, with gas turbines reserved for when higher speeds are needed. Some warships and a few modern cruise ships have also used the steam turbines to improve the efficiency of their gas turbines in a combined cycle, where wasted heat from a gas turbine exhaust is utilized to boil water and create steam for driving a steam turbine. In such combined cycles, thermal efficiency can be the same or slightly greater than that of diesel engines alone; however, the grade of fuel needed for these gas turbines is far more costly than that needed for the diesel engines, so the running costs are still higher. I name the ship Queen Mary 2 --Queen Elizabeth II The Queen Mary 2 is a Cunard Line passenger ship named after the earlier Cunard liner Queen Mary, which was in turn named after Mary of Teck. ... The diesel engine is a type of internal combustion engine; more specifically, a compression ignition engine, in which the fuel is ignited by the high temperature of a compressed gas, rather than a separate source of energy (such as a spark plug). ... A combined cycle is characteristic of a power producing engine or plant that employs more than one thermodynamic cycle. ...


Group terminology

Ships may occur collectively as fleets, squadrons, flotillas, or convoys. A rare occurance of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ... A flotilla (from Spanish, meaning a flota of small ships, and this from French flotte), or naval flotilla, is a formation of small warships that may be part of a larger fleet. ... A convoy is a group of vehicles traveling together for mutual support. ...


A collection of ships for military purposes may compose a navy, task force, or an armada. The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... A task force (TF) is a temporary unit or formation established to work on a single defined task or activity. ... Armada may refer to: Armada Española, the Spanish Navy. ...


In the past, people counting or grouping disparate types of ship may refer to the individual vessels as bottoms, but this generally refers only to merchant vessels. Groups of sailing ships could constitute a fleet of ___ sail (e.g., "a fleet of 40 sail"). Groups of submarines (particularly German U-boats in the 1940s) formerly hunted in wolf packs. Bottom can refer to: In general, the lowermost part (see Wiktionary:Bottom). ... U-boat is also a nickname for some diesel locomotives built by GE; see List of GE locomotives October 1939. ... The term wolf pack refers to the mass-attack tactics against convoys used by U-boats of the Kriegsmarine during the Battle of the Atlantic and submarines of the United States Navy against Japanese shipping in the Pacific Ocean in World War II. Karl Dönitz used the term Rudel...


Some types of ships and boats

Semi-submersible MV Blue Marlin carrying USS Cole
Semi-submersible MV Blue Marlin carrying USS Cole
Semi-submersible The Zhen Hua 1 in Astoria, Oregon

Download high resolution version (900x675, 76 KB)Description: M/V Blue Marlin carrying USS Cole (DDG-67). ... Download high resolution version (900x675, 76 KB)Description: M/V Blue Marlin carrying USS Cole (DDG-67). ... MV Mighty Servant 2 carries USS from Dubai to Newport, R.I., in 1988. ... MV Blue Marlin carrying USS Cole M/V Blue Marlin and her sister ship M/V Black Marlin comprise the Marlin class of semi-submersible heavy-lift ship. ... The second USS Cole (DDG-67) is an Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer homeported in NS Norfolk, Virginia. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 963 KB) The Zhen Hua 1 passing under the Astoria Bridge at low tide to deliver a new crane to the Port of Portland I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 963 KB) The Zhen Hua 1 passing under the Astoria Bridge at low tide to deliver a new crane to the Port of Portland I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify... MV Mighty Servant 2 carries USS from Dubai to Newport, R.I., in 1988. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and in most cases recover aircraft, acting as a sea... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... Typical internal arrangement A bathyscape, bathyscaphe, or bathyscaph is a free-diving self-propelled deep-sea diving submersible, consisting of a crew cabin similar to a bathysphere suspended below a float (rather than from a surface cable, as in the classic bathysphere design) Bathyscaphe Trieste, before dive into Marianas Trench... Main article: Merchant ship A bulk carrier, bulk freighter, or bulker is a merchant ship used to transport unpackaged bulk cargo such as cereals, coal, ore, and cement. ... An oil tanker taking on bunker fuel. ... A cable layer is a deep-sea vessel designed and used to lay underwater cables for telecommunications, electricity, and such. ... The capital ships of a navy are its important warships; the ones with the heaviest firepower and armor. ... Hapag-Lloyd Container ship Container ship A cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship or vessel that carries cargo, goods, and materials from one port to another. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... Coastal trading vessels, also known as coasters, are shallow-hulled ships used for trade between locations on the same island or continent. ... Container ship in Istanbul Container ships are cargo ships that carry all of their load in truck-size containers, in a technique called containerization. ... French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate but larger than a coastal patrol craft. ... Balder, Holstein, and Thialf USS Kearsarge as A crane vessel is a ship that is specialized in lifting heavy loads. ... Pacific Sky sails under Sydney Harbour Bridge A cruise ship or a cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ships amenities are considered an essential part of the experience. ... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser (really an uprated guided missile destroyer), launched in 1992. ... For other uses see cutter (disambiguation) An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... USS McFaul underway in the Atlantic Ocean. ... A diving support vessel is a ship that is used as a floating base for professional diving projects. ... A drillship is a maritime vessel that has been fitted with drilling apparatus. ... ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... A fishing vessel is any ship used to catch fish on seas, lakes or rivers. ... Floating restaurant is a kind of vessel which is usually a kind of dumb steel barge to use as a restaurant on water. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... Terra Nova FPSO A Floating Production, Storage and Offloading vessel (FPSO; also called a unit and a system) is a type of floating tank system used by the offshore oil and gas industry and designed to take all of the oil or gas produced from a nearby platform (s), process... The USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga class cruiser. ... Hopper Barge is a kind of non-mechanical (cannot move around itself) ship or vessel in the category of Barge, which can carry the dumping materials (like rocks, sand, soil and rubbish) to fill up the sea, river or lake for land by the method of reclamation. ... See also Hopper barge. ... A Hovercraft, or Air-Cushion Vehicle (ACV), is an amphibious vehicle or craft, designed to travel over any sufficiently smooth surface - land or water - supported by a cushion of slowly moving, low-pressure air, ejected downwards against the surface close below it. ... This article is about marine engineering. ... Icebreaker Polarstern Track of research vessel Polarstern while breaking ice in the Southern Ocean An icebreaker is a special purpose ship or boat designed to move and navigate through ice-covered waters. ... The Jetfoil Toppi is a ferry which connects Yakushima, Tanegashima Island and Kagoshima port in Japan A hydrofoil is a boat with wing-like foils mounted on struts below the hull. ... The Junk is a Chinese sailing vessel. ... Landing craft Rapière LCU 1656 departs USS Bataan (LHD-5) well deck during Hurricane Katrina relief operations. ... The ill-fated SS Edmund Fitzgerald, built in the classic dual superstructure style with her wheelhouse up near the bow. ... An LNG carrier is a ship designed for transporting liquefied natural gas. ... // For the bird of prey, see Laggar Falcon. ... USS Pivot (AM 276) World War II United States Admirable Class Minesweeper shown in the Gulf of Mexico on sea trials 12 July 1944 Image:Hameln Class. ... A Pinguin B3 minehunting ROV of the German Navy, explosive charges can be seen underneath the main body. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Packet trade generally refers to any regularly scheduled passenger and cargo trade conducted by ship. ... The two ships seen here seem almost to be touching the walls of the Miraflores Locks. ... A passenger ship is a ship whose primary function is to carry passengers. ... The reefer is a type of ship typically used to transport perishable commodities which require temperature-controlled transportation, mostly fruits, meat, fish, vegetables, dairy products and other foodstuffs. ... // A research vessel (R/V) is a ship primarily constructed to carry out scientific research at sea. ... Skaugran Oslo Loading a Ro Ro passenger car ferry The Cetus Leader A Canadian RORO Ferry A PCC ships starboard side showing side ramp. ... Traditional wooden cutter under sail. ... A selfdischarger is a ship able to discharge her cargo using vessels own gear. ... MV Mighty Servant 2 carries USS from Dubai to Newport, R.I., in 1988. ... A sloop-rigged J-24 sailboat A sloop (From Dutch sloep) in sailing, is a vessel with a fore-and-aft rig. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... A supertanker is an unofficial nickname that applies to a certain class of tanker ship built to transport very large quantities of liquids; in practice this typically refers to crude oil. ... Supply boat, or Supply Ship is a kind of vessel to supply all the necessaries for the crews or workers on the oil drilling rigs at the sea. ... Supply boat, or Supply Ship is a kind of vessel to supply all the necessaries for the crews or workers on the oil drilling rigs at the sea. ... Commercial crude oil supertanker AbQaiq. ... Tender may mean: In finance: A process by which one can seek prices and terms for a particular project (such as a construction job) to be carried out under a contract. ... A loaded train ferry approaching the dock in Detroit, Michigan, April 1943. ... A modern Icelandic trawler A trawler is a fishing vessel designed for the purpose of operating a trawl, a type of fishing net that is dragged along the bottom of the sea (or sometimes above the bottom at a specified depth). ... A Greek trireme. ... A tugboat shown turning a large RORO cargo ship. ... A supertanker is a tanker ship built to transport very large quantities of liquids, especially crude oil. ... A supertanker is a tanker ship built to transport very large quantities of liquids, especially crude oil. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...

Some historical types of ships and boats

A two-masted schooner
A two-masted schooner
  • Barque A sailing vessel with three or more masts, fore-and-aft rigged on only the aftermost.
  • Barquentine A sailing vessel with three or more masts, square-rigged only on the foremast.
  • Battle cruiser A lightly-armoured battleship.
  • Battleship A large, heavily-armoured and heavily-gunned warship. A term which generally post-dates sailing warships.
  • Bilander
  • Bireme An ancient vessel, propelled by two banks of oars.
  • Birlinn
  • Blockade runner A ship whose current business is to slip past a blockade.
  • Brig A two-masted, square-rigged vessel.
  • Brigantine A two-masted vessel, square-rigged on the foremast and fore-and-aft rigged on the main.
  • Caravel A much smaller, two, sometimes three-masted ship.
  • Carrack
  • Clipper A fast multiple-masted sailing ship, generally used by merchants because of their speed capablities.
  • Cog
  • Collier A vessel designed for the coal trade.
  • Dreadnought An early twentieth century class of battleship.
  • Dromons are the precursors to galleys.
  • East Indiaman An armed merchantman belonging to one of the East India companies (Dutch, British etc.)
  • Fire ship A vessel of any sort, set on fire and sent into an anchorage with the aim of causing consternation and destruction. The idea is generally that of forcing an enemy fleet to put to sea in a confused, therefore vulnerable state.
  • Fleut A Dutch-made vessel from the Golden Age of Sail. It had multiple decks and usually three square-rigged masts. It was usually used for merchant purposes.
  • Galleass A sailing and rowing warship, equally well suited to sailing and rowing.
  • Galleon A sixteenth century sailing warship.
  • Galley A warship propelled by oars with a sail for use in a favourable wind.
  • Galliot
  • Ironclad A wooden warship with external iron plating.
  • Knarr A type of Viking trade ship
  • Liberty ship An American merchant ship of the late Second World War period, designed for rapid building in large numbers. (The earliest class of welded ships.)
  • Longship A Viking raiding ship
  • Man of war A sailing warship.
  • Monitor A small, very heavily gunned warship with shallow draft. Designed for land bombardment.
  • Paddle steamer A steam-propelled, paddle-driven vessel, a name commonly applied to nineteenth century excursion steamers.
  • Pantserschip A Dutch ironclad. By the end of the nineteenth century, the name was applied to a heavy gunboat designed for colonial service.
  • Penteconter An ancient warship propelled by 50 oars, 25 on each side.
  • Pram A small dinghy, originally of a clinker construction and called in English, as in Danish, a praam. The Danish orthography has changed so that it would now be a prĂ¥m in its original language. It has a transom at both ends, the forward one usually small and steeply raked in the traditional design.
  • Q-ship A commerce raider camouflaged as a merchant vessel.
  • Quinquereme An ancient warship propelled by three banks of oars. On the upper row three rowers hold one oar, on the middle row - two rowers, and on the lower row - one man to an oar.
  • Schooner A fore and aft-rigged vessel with two or more masts of which the foremast is shorter than the main.
  • Shallop A large, heavily built, sixteenth century boat. Fore and aft rigged. More recently it has been a poetically frail open boat.
  • Slave ship A cargo boat specially converted to transport slaves.
  • Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) A modern ship design used for Research Vessels and other purposes needing a steady ship in rough seas.
  • Steamship A ship propelled by a steam engine.
  • Ship of the line A sailing warship of first, second or third rate. That is, with 64 or more guns. Before the late eighteenth century, fourth rates (50-60 guns) also served in the line of battle.
  • Torpedo boat A small, fast surface vessel designed for launching torpedoes.
  • Tramp steamer A steamer which takes on cargo when and where it can find it.
  • Trireme An ancient warship propelled by three banks of oars.
  • Xebec
  • Victory ship

Download high resolution version (765x892, 173 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (765x892, 173 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A barc is a type of sailing vessel. ... This article is about the ship. ... HMS Invincible, one of Britains first battlecruisers Battlecruisers were large warships of the early 20th century. ... For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ... A Bilander, also spelled billander or belandre, was a small European merchant ship with two masts, used in the Netherlands for coast and canal traffic and occasionally seen in the North Sea but more frequently to be seen in the Mediterranean Sea. ... A French galley and Dutch men_of_war off a port by Abraham Willaerts, painted 17th century. ... In heraldry, birlinns are often known as lymphads A Birlinn comprised a class of small galleys with 12 to 18 oars, used especially in the Hebrides and West Highlands of Scotland in the Middle Ages. ... A blockade runner is a ship designed to provide vital supplies to countries or areas blockaded by enemy forces during wartime. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Brigantine. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... Caravela Latina / Latin Caravel Caravela Redonda / Square-rigged Caravel A caravel is a small, highly maneuverable, two or three-masted ship used by the Portuguese and Spanish for long voyages of exploration beginning in the 15th century. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... A model of a vessel of the clipper type, the four-masted barque named Belle Étoile A clipper was a very fast multiple-masted sailing ship of the 19th century. ... Excavated cog from 1380 Cogs or rather cog-built vessels came into existence around 12th century AD. They were cheracterized by flush-laid flat bottom at midships but gradually shifted to overlapped strakes near the posts. ... For other uses, see Collier. ... The sixth HMS Dreadnought of the Royal Navy was a revolutionary battleship which entered service in 1906. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... A Byzantine fresco showing a dromon Byzantine dromon. ... An East Indiaman was a ship belonging to the British East India Company. ... This article is not about the fireboats that fight fire Defeat of the Spanish Armada, 1588-08-08 by Philippe-Jacques de Loutherbourg, painted 1796, depicts Drakes fire ship attack on the Spanish Armada. ... The Fleut was by definition a Dutch-made ship during the Golden age of sail. ... A French galley and Dutch men-of-war off a port by Abraham Willaerts, painted 17th century. ... A Spanish galleon. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... A French galley and Dutch men-of-war off a port by Abraham Willaerts, painted 17th century. ... A French galley and Dutch men-of-war off a port by Abraham Willaerts, painted 17th century. ... Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ... The knarr (plural: knarrer) was the generic name for viking trade and mercantile ships. ... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Oseberg longship (Viking Ship Museum, Norway) Oseberg longship from the front, one of the most stunning expressions of Norse art and craftsmanship A longship tacking in the wind Longships were ships primarily used by the Scandinavian Vikings and the Saxons to raid coastal and inland settlements during the European... A man of war (also man-of-war, man-o-war or simply man) is an armed naval vessel. ... USS Monitor became the prototype of a form of ship built by several navies for coastal defence in the 1860s and 1870s and known as a monitor. ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... Pantserschip Hertog Hendrik A pantserschip can be described as a coastal defence battleship with limited blue-water capacity. ... A French galley and Dutch men-of-war off a port by Abraham Willaerts, painted 17th century. ... A pram or pramm was a type of shallow-draught flat-bottomed ship used in Europe during the 18th century, particularly in the Baltic Sea during the Great Northern War and Napoleonic Wars, as the prams shallow draught allowed it to approach the shore. ... A hidden gun on a Q-ship in World War I. The Q-ship or Q-boat was a weapon used against German U-boats during World War I primarily by Britain and during World War II primarily by the United States. ... A quinquireme was a galley, a warship propelled by oars, developed from the earlier trireme. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... A pleasure barge is a flat bottomed, slow moving boat used for leisure. ... Slave ships were cargo boats specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves, especially newly captured African slaves. ... A SWATH ship resembles a catamaran. ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... A torpedo boat is a relatively small and fast naval ship designed to launch torpedoes at larger surface ships. ... A tramp steamer, or tramp for short, is any ship which does not have a fixed schedule or published ports of call. ... A Greek trireme. ... XEBEC is a subsidiary of the anime studio Production I.G. that specialises in the production of television anime. ... The Victory ship was a type of cargo ship produced in large numbers by North American shipyards during World War II to replace losses caused by German submarines. ...

See also

Nautical Portal

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... USS Akron (ZRS-4) in flight, November 2, 1931 An airship or dirigible is a buoyant lighter-than-air aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... The Anatomy of the Ship series of books are comprehensive treatments of the design and construction of individual ships. ... For other uses, see Boat (disambiguation). ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Hapag-Lloyd Container ship Container ship A cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship or vessel that carries cargo, goods, and materials from one port to another. ... Chartering Verb: The act of contracting a ship to perform the service of hauling goods (dry or wet) or people (supercargo). ... The concrete tanker USS Palo Alto Interior of concrete ship from World War I. Concrete ships are ships built of concrete instead of more traditional materials, like steel and wood. ... Offshore Support Vessel Toisa Perseus with, in the background, the fifth-generation deepwater drillship Discoverer Enterprise, at the Thunder Horse location. ... Flag State refers to that authority under which a country exercises regulatory control over the Commercial vessel which is registered under its flag. ... In modern English, the term ghost ship has come to denote at least one of three separate (though occasionally overlapping) definitions, all of which involving, in one respect or other, unexplained circumstances. ... A list of nautical terms; some remain current, many date from the 17th-19th century. ... Maritime history is a broad thematic element of global history. ... USNS Comfort takes on supplies at Mayport, FL enroute to Gulf Coast. ... The crew of this ship was glad to make it to port Icing on ships is a serious hazard where cold temperatures (below about -10°C) combined with high wind speed (typically force 8 or above on the Beaufort scale) result in spray blown off the sea freezing immediately on... Headquarters of the International Maritime Organisation in Lambeth, adjacent to the east end of Lambeth Bridge Headquarters building taken from the west side of the Thames Headquartered in London, U.K., the International Maritime Organization (IMO) promotes cooperation among governments and the shipping industry to improve maritime safety and to... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The following are ships that are or were in commercial or civilian use and have nuclear marine propulsion. ... Here is a list of famous ships: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This is a list of fictional ships, waterborne vessels that have been identified by name in works of fiction but do not really exist as such (often a real ship is used as a stage set, but the real name is not used). ... This list of shipwrecks is of those sunken ships whose remains have been located. ... Admiralty law (usually referred to as simply admiralty and also referred to as maritime law) is a distinct body of law which governs maritime questions and offenses. ... Steamer New York in c. ... HMS Invincible, a British Invincible-class aircraft carrier USS Port Royal (CG-73), an American Ticonderoga class cruiser HMCS Algonquin, a Canadian Iroquois-class destroyer HMAS Darwin, an Australian Adelaide-class frigate A naval ship is a ship (or sometimes boat, depending on classification) used for combat purposes, commonly by... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Seamanship is the art of operating a ship or boat. ... A ship model basin may be defined as one of two separate yet related entities, namely: a physical basin or tank used to carry out hydrodynamic tests with ship models, for the purpose of designing a new (full sized) ship, or refining the design of a ship to improve the... Model of a 19th-century vessel in the Bishop Museum, Hawaii Ship models (or model ships) are scale representations of sea-going vessels. ... A ship replica is a reconstruction of a no longer existing ship. ... A container ship // “Water transport” redirects here. ... Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... The Space Shuttle Discovery as seen from the International Space Station. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A ship prefix is a combination of letters, usually abbreviations, used in front of the name of a civilian or naval ship. ...

External links

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Freedom Ship - the City at Sea (448 words)
The Freedom Ship has little in common with a conventional ship; it is actually nothing more than a big barge.
The bolt-up construction and the unusually large amount of steel incorporated into the ship meets the design engineer's requirements for stability and structural integrity and the cost engineers requirements of "economic feasibility" but the downside is a severe reduction in top speed, making the ship useless for any existing requirements.
For example, it would be too slow to be a cruise ship or a cargo ship.
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