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A shinty game in progress

Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. Shinty is now played almost exclusively in the Highlands of Scotland, but it was formerly more widespread, reaching as far as England.[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x602, 92 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x602, 92 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Womens Australian rules football is a team sport. ... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... This article is about the country. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II...


The sport was derived from the same root as the Irish game of hurling, and is similar to bandy. For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Look up bandy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Shinty is one of the forebears of ice hockey, Scottish immigrants to Nova Scotia playing a game on ice in 1800 at Windsor. In Canada, informal hockey games are still called shinny. Shinty is often compared to hurling, yet has many different rules and features. Shinty is more commonly compared to the modern day hockey. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... St. ... Shinny is an informal type of hockey, either on ice or as street hockey. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ...


In the Scottish Lowlands, it was formerly referred to as common/cammon (caman), cammock (from Scottish Gaelic camag), knotty and various other names. The Scottish Lowlands (a Ghalldachd, meaning roughly the non-Gaelic region, in Gaelic), although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gàidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due south and east... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ...


Game

The objective of the game is to play a small ball into a goal, or "hail", erected at the ends of a 120 to 160-yard-long pitch. The ball is played using the caman, a stick of about 3 1/2 ft in length. Unlike the Irish camán, it has no blade. The caman is traditionally made of wood and must not have any plate or metal attached to it. The caman would be made from any piece of wood with a hook in it, hence caman, from the Scottish Gaelic, cam meaning bent or crooked. In the Uists, stalks of seaweed were put to use due to a lack of trees. Modern camans are made from several laminates of ash which are glued and cut into shape, although one-piece camans were still commonplace until the early 1980s. Ascophyllum nodosum exposed to the sun in Nova Scotia, Canada Dead Mans Fingers (Codium fragile) off Massachusetts coast For the Marine Biology Summer internship Marine Algae by Friday Harbor Laboratories, see; Marine Algae For the band, see; Seaweed (band) For the rock musician, see; Seaweed (musician) Seaweeds are any... Species See text European Ash in flower Narrow-leafed Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) shoot with leaves Closeup of European Ash seeds 19th century illustration of Manna Ash (Fraxinus ornus) An ash can be any of four different tree genera from four very distinct families (see end of page for disambiguation), but...


A team consists of 12 players, including one goalkeeper. A match is played over two halves of 45 minutes. With the exception of the keeper, no player is allowed to play the ball with his hands. There are also variants with smaller sides, with some adjustments in the field size and duration of play.


Whilst comparisons are often made with field hockey, the two sports have several important differences. In shinty, a player is allowed to play the ball in the air and is allowed to use both sides of the stick. The stick may also be used to block and to tackle, although a player may not come down on an opponent's stick, this is defined as hacking. A player may tackle using the body as long as this is shoulder-to-shoulder as in football. A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ...


A player may only stop the ball with the stick, the chest, two feet together or one foot planted on the ground. Only the goalkeeper may use his hands and then only with an open palm. He may not catch it. Playing the ball with the head constitutes a foul whether intentional or not.


Fouls result in a free-hit, which is indirect unless the foul is committed in the penalty area, commonly referred to as "The D". This results in a penalty hit from 20 yards.


A ball played by a team over the opposing bye line results in a goal hit from the edge of the D, a ball played by a team over their own results in a corner. A ball hit over the sideline results in a shy. A shinty shy involves the taker tossing the ball above his head and hitting the ball with the shaft of the caman. The ball must be directly overhead when struck to be legal.

The field of play
The field of play

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (900x442, 69 KB) This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (900x442, 69 KB) This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ...

History

Gaelic settlers from Ireland brought the sport of hurling to Scotland, where the game was played as such until the 14th century, albeit with a different caman from the Irish one. The Gaels are an ethno-linguistic group which spread from Ireland to many parts of Britain, specifically Scotland, the Isle of Man, Wales and Cornwall. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...


The game was traditionally played through the winter months, with New Year's Day being the day when whole villages would gather together to play games featuring teams of up to 80 a side, players often using any piece of wood with a hook as a caman.


In 1887, a historic game was played between Glenurquhart Shinty Club and Strathglass Shinty Club in Inverness. This game was attended by thousands of people and was a major milestone in developing a set of common rules. This fixture was to be repeated on 12th January 2007 in Inverness as the opening centrepiece of the Highland 2007 celebrations in Scotland, but was postponed due to a waterlogged pitch. Glenurquhart Shinty Club is a shinty team which plays in Drumnadrochit on the banks of Loch Ness, Scotland. ... Strathglass Shinty Club or Comunn Camanachd Straghlais in Scots Gaelic is a shinty club from Strathglass, Inverness. ... Inverness (Scottish Gaelic: ) is the only city in the Highland council area and the Highlands of Scotland (and is considered the unofficial capital). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


The modern sport is governed by the Camanachd Association (Scots Gaelic: Comann na Camanachd). The association came into being in the late Victorian era in as a means of formulating common rules to unite the various different codes and rules which even differed between neighbouring glens, in this the sport shares similarities with other sports which became organised around this time. The first meeting of the Camanachd Association was held in Kingussie in 1893. The New Logo of the Camanachd Association, with the Stags Head (Cabar Feidh) The Camanachd Association (in Scottish Gaelic, Comann na Camanachd) is the governing body of the Scottish sport of shinty. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Kingussie is a small burgh in the Scottish Highlands adjacent to the A9 road, although the old route of the A9 served as the towns main street. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Competitions

Shinty is traditionally divided into two administrative and playing areas, the North and the South. The geographic divide is at Ballachulish, with all clubs south of here being classified as South teams, although most are still northerly in comparison to most of Scotland. The long distances to travel have meant that the game in the South and in the North habitually have slightly different approaches to the game. The South considered to be more skilful in comparison to the more physical style propagated in the North. The South also has a slightly differing formation which is commonly used than that of the North. Ballachulish slate quarry. ...

Map of Scotland showing North/South divide in shinty
North Tactics
North Tactics
South Tactics
South Tactics

These clubs compete in various competitions, both cup and league, on a national and also North/South basis. Whilst the top two leagues are played on a national basis, the premier competition is the Scottish Cup or the Camanachd Association Challenge Cup (the Camanachd Cup for short) which has been dominated by Kingussie in the last twenty years. The other dominant team in shinty history has been Newtonmore, Kingussie's near neighbours. Strangely these two teams only met in the Camanachd Cup Final for the first time in 1984. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (529x759, 21 KB) I Created This Image Myself for Use On The Wikipedia Shinty PagesSologoal 20:17, 11 September 2006 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (529x759, 21 KB) I Created This Image Myself for Use On The Wikipedia Shinty PagesSologoal 20:17, 11 September 2006 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 318 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (477 × 900 pixel, file size: 45 KB, MIME type: image/png) Diagram demonstrating the formation commonly used in the North District of Shinty. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 318 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (477 × 900 pixel, file size: 45 KB, MIME type: image/png) Diagram demonstrating the formation commonly used in the North District of Shinty. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 318 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (477 × 900 pixel, file size: 44 KB, MIME type: image/png) Diagram illustrating the foramtion most commonly used in the South District of Shinty I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 318 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (477 × 900 pixel, file size: 44 KB, MIME type: image/png) Diagram illustrating the foramtion most commonly used in the South District of Shinty I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Camanachd Association Challenge Cup or the Camanachd Cup or Scottish Cup as it is known is the premier prize in the sport of shinty. ...


The 2006 final was played, for the first time, in Dunoon between holders Fort William and Kingussie. Kingussie regained the cup after three years due to a majestic performance by Ronald Ross. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dunoon, looking North from the Castle hill with the old Victorian pier to the right and The Queens Hall on the left The Holy Loch seen across the Firth of Clyde with Dunoon on the left The PS Waverley leaves Dunoon Pier, to sail up the Firth of Clyde. ...


In League shinty, Kingussie has been dominant for the past 20 years and, according to the Guinness Book of Records 2005, is world sport's most successful sporting team of all time, winning 20 consecutive league championships and going 4 years without losing a single fixture in the early 1990s. This incredible, unmatched run of dominance was ended on 2nd September by ancient rivals Newtonmore who defeated Oban Camanachd 2-0 to ensure that Kingussie could not catch the team at the top of the league. However, Newtonmore were unable to usurp their neighbours as champions, as the first post-Kingussie champions were confirmed as Fort William who sealed the title on 30th September 2006 having won their games in hand over Newtonmore. Kingussie Camanachd is a shinty team from Kingussie, Scotland and according to the Guinness Book of Records 2005, is World sports most successful sporting team of all time, winning 19 consecutive league championships and going 4 years unbeaten at one stage in the early 1990s. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ... Newtonmore Camanachd Club is a shinty club from Newtonmore, Badenoch, Scotland. ... Oban Camanachd is one of the oldest Camanachd clubs currently playing in the Shinty leagues of Scotland, they are currently competing in the Premier League. ... Fort William Shinty Club is a shinty club from Fort William, Lochaber, Scotland. ...


Summer shinty

In 2003, shinty clubs voted for a trial period of two years of a summer season from March to October, with a view to moving permanently to summer shinty if the experiment was judged to be a success. Despite opposition from the "Big Two", Kingussie and Newtonmore, and other small groups in the game, an EGM in November 2005 voted by an overwhelming majority (well over the required two thirds) to make summer shinty the basis upon which the game would proceed. Kingussie is a small burgh in the Scottish Highlands adjacent to the A9 road, although the old route of the A9 served as the towns main street. ... Newtonmore Camanachd Club is a shinty club from Newtonmore, Badenoch, Scotland. ... An Extraordinary General Meeting, commonly abbreviated as EGM, is a meeting of members of an organisation, shareholders of a company, or employees of an offical body, which occurs at an irregular time. ...


Predominantly a Highland game, there are also clubs to found in Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Perth and even London. University Shinty is a popular section of the sport, with almost all Scotland's main universities possessing a team. Historically, Glasgow University, Aberdeen University and Edinburgh University have vied for supremacy but in recent years, Strathclyde University, Robert Gordon's College and Dundee University have risen to prominence. It is also played in the British Army with The Highlanders Shinty Club keeping alive the tradition of the game being played in the Forces. Aberdeen University Shinty Club is a shinty club from Aberdeen, Scotland. ... // Colours Sky Blue Tops, Navy Shorts, Sky Blue Socks Stadium Levenhall Links, Musselburgh,East Lothian, Scotland Nickname The Honest EELs History Present-day shinty came to East Lothian during the mid 1990s, principally at the instigation of Dougie Hunter (a shinty playing graduate of St Andrews University) and Ian... Glasgow Mid Argyll Shinty Club AKA GMA is a shinty club from Glasgow, Scotland. ... Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Shinty teams which play University Shinty are clubs which play under the banner of a university. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group, Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The University of Strathclyde is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Robert Gordons College (known by the acronym RGC) is a private co-educational day school in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Highlanders is the only shinty team in the British Armed Forces. ...


In recognition of shinty's shared roots with hurling, an annual international between the two codes from Scotland and Ireland is played on a home and away basis using composite rules. In recent years the Irish have had the upper hand but the Scots won the fixture narrowly in 2005 and again in 2006, this time at Croke Park, Dublin albeit with the Irish fielding weaker players from the second tier Christy Ring Cup. Composite rules Shinty/Hurling (sometimes known simply as Shinty/Hurling or, particularly in Ireland, compromise rules) is a hybrid sport which was developed to facilitate international representative matches between shinty players and hurling players. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: 01, +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... The Christy Ring Cup is in effect a competition for the Division 2 hurling teams, the so-called middle-ranking hurling teams in Ireland. ...


Although Camanachd Cup finals and internationals have been shown over the years, 2006 marked the first ever regular TV deal for shinty with matches being shown on the BBC Sports show Spòrs. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In August 2006, the Camanachd Association decided to move its main offices to Inverness from Banavie near Fort William. This move was met with consternation by many in the sporting community with calls for an extraordinary general meeting. The EGM was held but a vote of no confidence in the Board of Directors was voted down. The Association recently appointed its first female chief executive Gill McDonald. Inverness (Scottish Gaelic: ) is the only city in the Highland council area and the Highlands of Scotland (and is considered the unofficial capital). ... Ben Nevis (Beinn Nibheis) viewed from Banavie Banavie (Scottish Gaelic: Bainbhidh) is a small settlement near Fort William in the Highland Region of Scotland. ...


Shinty outside Scotland

London Camanachd is the only shinty club in England. They do not play league matches but do compete at present in the Bullough Cup. They have historically been attached to the South District. They went into abeyance in 1992 but were reconstituted in 2005. They played the first officially recognised shinty match outside Scotland in 80 years on Saturday 22nd July 2006 against the Highlanders. Shinty was previously played widely in England in the 19th Century and early 20th century and Nottingham Forest F.C. was established by Shinty Players. See References Section for further information. London Camanachd is the only shinty club in England. ... The Highlanders is the only shinty team in the British Armed Forces. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Shinty is also spreading to North America, though originally played in the 18th and 19th century by Scottish immigrants, the sport died out. However, it is enjoying a revival, teams such as Northern California Camanachd Club (NCCC), Houston Camanachd Club (HCC), Washington Camanachd Club (WCC), Dunedin Camanachd (Florida) play at Highland Games and other venues across the USA. There is interest in forming clubs in Utah, Arizona and North Carolina, however the Morro Bay Shinty Club went inactive as of April 2007. See also Shinty in North America. North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Shinty was played in its original form throughout North and South America by Scottish settlers until the early 1900s when the practice died out. ... Shinty was played in its original form throughout North and South America by Scottish settlers until the early 1900s when the practice died out. ... Shinty was played in its original form throughout North and South America by Scottish settlers until the early 1900s when the practice died out. ... Opening ceremonies of 2004 Canmore Highland games Highland games are events held throughout the year in Scotland and other countries as a way of celebrating Scottish and Celtic culture and heritage, especially that of the Scottish Highlands. ... The logo of US Camanachd // Shinty was played in its original form throughout North and South America by Scottish settlers until the early 1900s when the practice died out. ...


See also

Look up bandy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Camanachd Association Challenge Cup or the Camanachd Cup or Scottish Cup as it is known is the premier prize in the sport of shinty. ... The game of cammag is a Manx team sport. ... Composite rules Shinty/Hurling (sometimes known simply as Shinty/Hurling or, particularly in Ireland, compromise rules) is a hybrid sport which was developed to facilitate international representative matches between shinty players and hurling players. ... // Hailes is a Scottish ball game dating back to the eighteenth century and gaining in popularity during the nineteenth. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... The Littlejohn of Invercharron Challenge Vase, also known as simply the Littlejohn Vase, is a trophy in University Shinty. ... Ronald Ross is a Scottish shinty player (b. ... Shinny is an informal type of hockey, either on ice or as street hockey. ... The Old Course at St Andrews. ...

References

  1. ^ http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article1431145.ece

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Shinty Website - History (835 words)
During the period of these two universal conflicts, organised shinty was discontinued and many of the playing generations then were lost to campaigns far distant from the pitches where they had followed this deeply-loved recreation of their ancestors.
In common with other sports, shinty moved out of a long previous history of unwritten rules and widely differing local variations in the last quarter of the nineteenth century.
The teams were fourteen a side and the occasion clearly showed the need for one authority to control the playing of shinty.
Shinty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1057 words)
Shinty, also known as camanachd or iomain, is a team sport played with sticks and a ball.
Shinty is one of the forebears of ice hockey, Scottish immigrants to Nova Scotia playing a game on ice in 1800 at Windsor.
Shinty is also spreading to North America, though originally played in the 18th and 19th century by Scottish immigrants, the sport died out, however it is enjoying a revival.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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